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Swapping Hard drives


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#1 eyeballs

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 01:50 PM

A mate of mine has a pc out of which smoke started to come out, so he brought it to a repair shop and they fitted a new fan section and the pc would only work for 5 to 10 minuteas afterwards and then power off.
He got an old pc from work and tried to swap the hard drives ( the work pc is networked, needs login details) but when he powers up the pc it says no operating system found.
Is he doing something wrong, or does he need to change settings in the bios so the pc will recognise the other harddrive?

Thanks
Also anyone have an idea why the old pc would power off

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#2 Broni

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 05:32 PM

Swapping hard drives won't work, because Windows installation is tied up to computer's hardware.
You need to install Windows (freshly).

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#3 MrBruce1959

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 05:32 PM

I am assuming that your friend took a hard drive from another computer and placed it in this computer and is expecting it to boot up.

This does not always work out well, because the hard drive in question here originally was set up to work with a totally different chip set configuration from the other computer.

So may be why the boot sector is not being recognized.

The best way to use this hard drive is to do a clean install of the operating system.

If there is anything you are trying to save from the drive, it is possible to use it as a slave drive and access it through an operating system already installed on the Primary Master hard drive.

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#4 dc3

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 08:40 PM

If this is a IDE hdd with a Windows operating system installed on it, and it has been placed in another computer as a Master hdd, the chances of the operating system failing is high. Different motherboards have different chipsets, and the operating system recognizes IDs of these chipsets. If a hdd with a Windows operating system is moved to a computer with different chipset the operating system becomes "confused" and may not even boot.

If you have a hdd with a Windows operating system that you wish to retrieve information from, an IDE hdd that is, you need to install it in another computer as a Slave drive, and change the jumper on the rear of the hdd to reflect this.

If you have tried to use this hdd in another computer without doing as suggested, there is a chance that you can do a repair installation and not lose your data. No promises though.

Edited to add more information:

When you take a hdd with a Windows OS installed on it that you have been using on one computer and then install it as a master in another computer you are asking for major problems. The excerpt below is from a Intel article which describes in detail what happens. The article also mentions a reference to an article by Microsoft, it can be seen here .

"Moving a hard drive with Windows* 2000 or Windows XP* already installed to a new motherboard without reinstalling the operating system is not recommended.

If a hard drive is moved to a new computer, the registry entries and drivers for the mass storage controller hardware on the new motherboard are not installed in Windows for the new computer and you may not be able to start Windows. This is documented in Microsoft's knowledge base article. This is true even if you move the hard drive to a motherboard with the same chipset, as different hardware revisions can cause this issue as well.

Additionally, moving a hard drive to a new motherboard may not exhibit any errors until you install new IDE drivers. This is because each chipset uses a different Plug-n-Play (PNP) ID to identify it. If you move your motherboard, your registry will have multiple PNP IDs (for the old hardware as well as the new hardware). If there are multiple entries in the registry, Windows cannot determine which hardware to initialize and therefore fails with a STOP error."


Alternatively, the method below can be tried, but I would back up all of your important files to removable media like CDs, DVDs, Flash drives, or a second hdd.

http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/moving_xp.html

Edited by dc3, 18 September 2010 - 08:43 PM.

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#5 MrBruce1959

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 11:39 PM

There you have it eyeballs, 3 of us, basically came to the same conclusion with why this hard drive is not booting properly.

I did have to laugh that Broni and I clicked reply at the same exact moment. (Note the time we posted)

And dc3 basically came up with the same conclusions.

We work well together here don't we? :thumbsup:

I like the suggestion dc3 added to this thread and suggest you apply all 3 pieces of advice together that we have offered to get the most satisfactory results.

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#6 eyeballs

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 04:32 AM

Thanks very much for all the info.
I had actually thought you could swap the drives.
I'll pass on ye're replies

once again thanks very much

Mick




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