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Improving wireless signal


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5 replies to this topic

#1 klausfunk

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 11:38 AM

Hi.

Any tips for improving WIFI signal?

My friend lives in a (rather large) old Rectory so the rooms are huge and the walls are very thick.
There are only 2 phone sockets, (close together) so router postioning is limited.
The router is currently in his study, which is very very cold and horrible to spend large amounts of time in.
He has just bought a new laptop so he can use it in the (warmer) kitchen at the other end of the house.
Problem is the WIFI signal is non existant there. Nothing! It just dissappers.
It pretty much vanishes when stepping out of his study!

I was thinking of a new router. Maybe one of the new "N" ones.

Would this be much of an improvement?
Or is there a better solution?

Thanks

Edited by klausfunk, 18 September 2010 - 11:38 AM.


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#2 NpaMA

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 12:25 PM

N will not give you a "good" signal, if G won't reach that far at all. Honestly, I rarely see a difference in my G and N routers I'm running here(which are side by side on channels 1 and 9 the least congested for my area).

Only thing I think you could do is run a ethernet cable to that end of the house, then adding a access point there(buy a router, turn DHCP off, and set it as an access point don't buy those special "access points" that are marked up).

#3 troublesh00ter

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Posted 20 September 2010 - 04:36 PM

You could also use a powerline kit. They are getting more and more popular.

It includes two blocks that you plug into your power outlets. It basically turns electrical circuitry into a network for Internet.

You plug in one block in the room where the router is, you plug the other block in the room where you want Internet. Run a line from the router/switch/hub into the block and receive it on the other end.

Although, the two rooms you're trying to connect have to be on the same circuit. Only flaw...
for3ver,
goose90proof

#4 Orecomm

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 12:48 PM

I would second the powerline suggestion. Big old houses with solid walls are murder on wireless. Note that the outlets don't have to be on the same circuit (as in same fuse or circuit breaker) but it does help if they are on the same Phase (normal house wiring uses two "phases" of power, and generally every alternate fuse or circuit breaker is on alternate phases). The signal won't go through transformers, and I wouldn't try using them through a surge suppressor or even worse a battery backup box, but I have clients using them between house and garage/shop a good 50 meters or more from the house. If at first it doesn't work to your satisfaction see if you can find a friendly electrician - it's not hard to swap a circuit from one phase to the other if you know what you are doing - but you really DO want to know what you are doing or you can let the lightning out of the box and create somewhat larger problems than wireless not working. There are lethal voltages in there.

#5 JGSnCA

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 12:45 PM

Orecomm....thank you. Does anyone have a recommendation on a powerline system for extending my wireless network? The user reviews I've found on-line seem to be mixed. Thanks in advance.

#6 Orecomm

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 12:15 PM

I suspect there are only a couple of chipset manufacturers, as with wireless, and most devices are quite similar. I'd go for the HomePlugAV (generally listed as "up to" 200Mbps) units, and for my nickel probably Zyxel or Netgear as a first shot. Both have versions that pass through the power plug so you don't lose an outlet, which is kind of a nice feature. A two unit kit is about $100 from any of the major vendors. Someone (Netgear?) used to make a set where the remote was a WiFi access point, kind of a range extender over powerline, but I don't think folks understood what it did and I haven't seen it advertised recently.




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