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Problem with adding another hd dirve for dell xps 410


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#1 ebayguy

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 11:14 PM

Hi,
I purchased a 1 tb serial ata internal drive to put in to the dell xps 410, which already had 320gb hard drive. I have hooked up power cable and data cable as needed. Then I restarted the computer. then I did F2 to initalize the new hdd in slot 05. the existing hdd is in slot 0 and slot 1 has dvd rom drive. Okay, so far so good. now I change the boot sequence by pressing f12 to boot 1 dvd rom 2. the first hdd and lastly the new hdd.
So when I boot it the welcome screen says Raid0:sts###### which is existing hdd, raid 1: dvdrom, and raid 5:wdc wd####.which is the new hd.

After that it gives this error:

Raid Volume:
None Defined.

Physical disk

Port drive model serial # size type/status/vol id
0 st##### 9N##### 298gb Non raid disk (in green)
5 WDC### WD-w### 931.9GB NON RAID DIsk (in green)


Press Cntrl-I to enter confugration utility.


After 30 seconds it starts the windows that I have my windows xp on the already existing hard drive.
My question is what am I suppossed to do with entering cntrl - I and then what are the steps or how to get in to the 2nd hard drive to install the windows. please help me figure out this problem. thanks in advance

Edited by hamluis, 11 September 2010 - 05:01 PM.
Moved from System Building to Internal Hardware ~ Hamluis.


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#2 MrBruce1959

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Posted 13 September 2010 - 07:52 PM

Hello and welcome to Bleepingcomputer.

I am providing a link to your computers support web site.

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/syst...20/en/index.htm

Here is a pdf version of your motherboard owners manual. http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/syst...M/PDF/OM_EN.pdf

Please give me a moment, the manual is 226 pages long let me figure out why your computer is mentioning the crtl-I option.

Bruce.
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#3 MrBruce1959

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Posted 13 September 2010 - 08:08 PM

Here we go I have the information, hang in there the text here is going to get rather lengthy.

About Your RAID Configuration
This section provides an overview of the RAID configuration you may have
selected when you purchased your computer. There are several RAID
configurations available in the computer industry for different types of uses.
Your computer supports RAID level 0 and RAID level 1. A RAID level 0
configuration is recommended for high-performance programs or gaming,
and a RAID level 1 configuration is recommended for users who require a
high level of data integrity. For example, those in the digital photography and
audio industries.
NOTE: RAID levels do not represent a hierarchy. A RAID level 1 configuration is not
inherently better or worse than a RAID level 0 configuration.
The drives in a RAID configuration should be the same size in order to ensure
that the larger drive does not contain unallocated (and therefore unusable)
space.
RAID Level 0 Configuration
NOTICE: Because RAID level 0 configurations provide no data redundancy, a
failure of one drive results in the loss of all data (the data on the remaining drive is
also inaccessible). Therefore, ensure that you perform regular backups when you
use a RAID level 0 configuration.
A RAID level 0 configuration uses a storage technique known as data striping
to provide a high data access rate. Data striping is a method of writing
consecutive segments, or stripes, of data sequentially across the physical
drives to create a large virtual drive. Data striping allows one of the drives to
read data while the other drive is searching for and reading the next block.

Another advantage of a RAID level 0 configuration is that it utilizes the full
storage capacities of the drives. For example, two 120-GB drives combine to
provide 240 GB of hard drive space on which to store data.
NOTE: In a RAID level 0 configuration, the size of the configuration is equal to the
size of the smallest drive multiplied by the number of drives in the configuration.

Using the Intel® RAID Option ROM Utility
NOTE: Hard drives of any size may be used to create a RAID configuration using the
Intel RAID Option ROM utility. Ideally, however, the drives should be of equal size to
avoid unallocated or unused space. For an explanation of RAID levels, see "About
Your RAID Configuration" on page 30.
Creating a RAID Level 0 Configuration
NOTICE: The following procedure will result in the loss of all data on your hard
drives. Back up any data you want to keep before continuing.
NOTE: Use the following procedure only if you are reinstalling your operating
system. Do not use the following procedure to migrate an existing storage
configuration to RAID level 0 configuration.
1 Set your computer to RAID-enabled mode (see "Setting Your Computer to
RAID-Enabled Mode" on page 33).
2 Press <Ctrl><I> when you are prompted to enter the Intel® RAID
Option ROM utility.
3 Press the up- and down-arrow keys to highlight Create RAID Volume,
then press <Enter>.
4 Enter a RAID volume name or accept the default name, then press <Enter>.
5 Press the up- and down-arrow keys to select RAID0 (Stripe), then press
<Enter>.
6 If there are more than two hard drives available, press the up- and down-arrow
keys and spacebar to select the two or three drives you want to use to make
up your configuration, then press <Enter>.
NOTE: Select the strip size closest to the size of the average file you want to store
on the RAID volume. If you do not know the average file size, choose 128 KB as your
strip size.
7 Press the up- and down-arrow keys to change the strip size, then press
<Enter>.
8 Select the desired capacity for the volume, then press <Enter>.
The default value is the maximum available size.
9 Press <Enter> to create the volume.
10 Press <Y> to confirm that you want to create the RAID volume.
11 Confirm that the correct volume configuration is displayed on the main
Intel® RAID Option ROM utility screen.
12 Press the up- and down-arrow keys to select Exit, and then press <Enter>.
13 Install the operating system. See "Reinstalling Windows Vista" on page 9

Using the Intel® Application Accelerator
If you already have one hard drive with the operating system installed on it,
and you want to add a second hard drive then reconfigure both drives into a
RAID volume without losing the existing operating system or data, use the
migrating option (see "Migrating to a RAID Level 0 Configuration" on
page 38 or "Migrating to a RAID Level 1 Configuration" on page 39). Create a
RAID level 0 volume or RAID level 1 volume only when:
• You are adding two new drives to an existing single-drive computer
(with the operating system installed on the single drive), and you want to
configure the two new drives into a RAID volume.
• You already have a two-hard drive computer configured into a volume, but
you still have some space left on the volume that you want to designate as
a second RAID volume.
Creating a RAID Level 0 Configuration
NOTICE: The following procedure will result in the loss of all data on the hard drives
in your RAID configuration. Back up any data you want to keep before continuing.
1 Set your computer to RAID-enabled mode (see "Setting Your Computer to
RAID-Enabled Mode" on page 33).
2 Click Start and point to Programs→ Intel® Application Accelerator→
Intel Matrix Storage Manager to launch the Intel® Storage Utility.
NOTE: If you do not see an Actions menu option, you have not yet set your
computer to RAID-enabled mode (see "Setting Your Computer to RAIDEnabled
Mode" on page 33).
3 On the Actions menu, select Create RAID Volume to launch the Create
RAID Volume Wizard, then click Next.
4 On the Select Volume Location screen, click the first hard drive you want
to include in your RAID level 0 volume, then click the right arrow.
5 Click to add a second hard drive, then click Next.
To add a third hard drive in your RAID level 0 volume, click the right arrow
and click on the third drive until three drives appear in the Selected
window, and then click Next.
6 In the Specify Volume Size window, click the Volume Size desired, then
click Next.
7 Click Finish to create the volume, or click Back to make changes.


These instructions explain how to do the procedures, using the RAID 0 configuration.

If you choosed to use RAID 1, this would make both drives exact mirrors duplicates of each other.

In your situation, your drives have operating systems on each drive, therefore you would NOT be using RAID 1 as an option.

Bruce.
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My Career Involves 37 Years as an Electronics Repair Technician, to Which I am Currently Retired From.

I Am Currently Using Windows 10 Home Edition.

As a Volunteer Staff Member of Bleeping Computer, the Help That I Proudly Provide Here To Our BC Forum Board Membership is Free of Charge. :wink:




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