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PXE-E61: Media Test Failure, Check Cable - OS Not Found - Please help!


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#1 wildzero

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 08:28 AM

Hello BC,

I hope I am posting this in the correct forum.

When I boot my laptop it sends me directly to a black screen, which then reads the following:

PXE-E61: Media test Failure, Check Cable
PXE-M0F - Exiting PXE ROM
Operating System Not Found _

I have a Dell Studio 1558, Windows 7, Intel i5 CPU M 520 @ 2.40GHz, 500GB Toshiba HD, BIOS vA04

Let me give you a brief summary of events. Last night I was recording on my laptop using Audacity. When I went to record multiple tracks the computer froze. I could not Ctrl-Alt-Del out of it, so I did a hard restart. After hard restart, the laptop would no longer reboot, it went directly to the screen mentioned above. When it tries to boot, it makes repetitive faint sounds, almost like there's an insect stuck in there (but very faint). I know that sounds weird, but it's the only way I can describe it.

I read the other posts related to this issue, and since none were related to my make/model laptop I took bits and pieces of instructions but did not feel confident enough to make any real changes. A brief explanation of what I have done so far:

Opened up the laptop, unscrewed and removed HD, blew on connectors and replaced. Went into BIOS, disabled Integrated NIC. Reorganized boot order to the following:

Removable Device
CD/DVD/CD-RW Drive
USB Storage
Hard Drive

After disabling NIC, the PXE error message is gone on reboot, but now I simply get a black screen that says "Operating System Not Found _"

It looks like BIOS does not recognize my HD exists (Fixed HDD: None). System Date and Time are accurate.

I REALLY hope the HD can be saved here - I haven't backed it up in about 6 months (stupid yes I know). Any and all suggestions are much appreciated. Thank you for your help in advance!!!

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 11:47 AM

Hi:).

Typically, that PXE error message indicates that the system is trying a network boot, in accordance with the BIOS settings.

IME, this can result from either a manual resetting of the BIOS boot options...or from a weakening CMOS battery. My guess is that there is nothing wrong with your hard drive.

Since you have a laptop, replacing the CMOS battery may not be as easy to do as it would be on a desktop.

I don't seem to be able to find the appropriate manual for your system (Studio 1558).

Louis

#3 wildzero

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 12:42 PM

Thanks Louis.

I am wondering though, since I disabled NIC the computer no longer tries to boot from the network, and I still just get a black screen with "Operating System Not Found_".

Would it still be trying to boot from the network w/ NIC disabled, and would the boot order make BIOS not see my hard drive?

I ran diagnostics using F12 as well, and that did not recognize the hard drive either.

#4 MrBruce1959

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 12:51 PM

I would go to your computers BIOS setup utility and make sure all hardware has been detected.

Once all hardware has been successfully detected save it by choosing F10 which is normally the save to CMOS and exit.

If this does not correct the problem, most laptops have modular connections, sometimes these modular connections fall victim to oxidation.

So the solution is to remove the devices, which usually slide out after a latch or screw is removed and push the device back in again.

When this is done, this disturbs the oxidation.

The problem with todays electronics is most devices are connected by means of one type of metal making contact with another piece of metal.

Things are not soldered like they used to be in the old days, so since two different pieces of metal have different chemical reactions to the air, they tend to become victims of what is called oxidation.

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#5 hamluis

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 12:52 PM

If the CMOS settings are wrong because of a weak battery...they cannot be relied upon. The CMOS is responsible for component hardware recognition/identification...if the battery needs to be replaced, nothing relative to the CMOS can be relied upon, IME.

If you want to test the hard drive....remove it from that system, attach it to a known good system...and see if it recognizes it.

Louis

#6 wildzero

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 02:00 PM

I would go to your computers BIOS setup utility and make sure all hardware has been detected.

Once all hardware has been successfully detected save it by choosing F10 which is normally the save to CMOS and exit.

If this does not correct the problem, most laptops have modular connections, sometimes these modular connections fall victim to oxidation.

So the solution is to remove the devices, which usually slide out after a latch or screw is removed and push the device back in again.


Thanks MrBruce, but isn't that the problem? BIOS doesn't detect the hard drive - how do you make it detect it successfully, as you suggest? Is there a step I'm missing?

Also, I already removed the hard drive and blew on/checked connections. They are fine (at least to the naked eye).


Louis,

Would the BIOS be able to save changes if the CMOS is weak? Because the changes I make are saved - although the BIOS does freeze up regularly. I will probably change the CMOS out, just to eliminate the possibility. I actually did find the manual here: http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/syst...t.htm#wp1179839

#7 wildzero

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 10:52 AM

I switched out the CMOS battery - no change.

Tested the hard drive using a Manhattan USB/SATA adapter - it did not appear as an external drive, just kept spinning and spinning.

I'm assuming my hard drive is fried? Any recommendations on how to save my data?

#8 MidwestTech

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 05:32 PM

WildZero,

It sounds like to hard drive has failed. As far as data recovery, you could attempt to 'slave' the drive to a desktop PC using a spare internal SATA connection, but if the desktop PC doesn't recognize it you are probably out of luck.

Todd

#9 s2kreno

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 03:08 AM

This happened on my Dell Studio 1440 while it was very new. Sent it back TWICE and they fixed nothing. PITA but whenever I have to restart I get the evil message. I disconnect the power cord, pull the battery out, put it back in, and start it up. Annoying and probably won't buy another Dell but I can live with this.




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