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cpu heat


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#1 bealer46

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 10:56 PM

i have a question.i need a refrence point.i have an lga 775 dual core cpu.at what temp should it operate.the temps that i see are 45c to 52c.is 52c too warm,or am i beeing paranoid.my machine is not overclocked.i use the stock heat sink.thanks for your opinons.

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#2 Broni

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 11:22 PM

I assume, you're talking Intel CPU here, but we need a model.
LGA 775 is not enough info.

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#3 dc3

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 09:46 AM

LGA 775 refers to the socket type of the CPU, this specific on is also known as a Socket T.

This socket supports Intel CPUs only, there are twelve different CPUs that use the LGA 775 socket.

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#4 bealer46

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 10:03 AM

thanks for the quick responses.i have an intel core 2 duo e 2200 cpu.

#5 dc3

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 10:17 AM

45C to 53C is well within that CPU'S temperature range. It's maximum temperature is 70C.

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#6 bealer46

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 10:46 AM

i set the bios to shut down at
C 70. thanks for the info.

#7 Broni

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 07:13 PM

Personally, I see 45-50C while computer idle, little bit too warm.

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#8 dc3

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 10:29 PM

45-52 degrees C are considered normal operating temperature for that CPU. 70 degrees C is at the edge of say goodbye to the CPU.

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#9 Broni

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 10:43 PM

This may be interesting discussion....
Basically, I see no reason, why an idle computer CPU temperature, should be higher, than a few degrees over the room temperature.
I'm surely talking about desktops here.
At least, this is how I like to keep my computer running.
At this very moment, my room temperature is 23C and my CPU temperature is listed at 26C.
The back of my case sits next to a window (closed), which may be helping a little.
Running just Firefox, TBird and Windows Explorer.

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#10 dc3

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 10:59 PM

Different environments, different levels of cleanliness and circulation all come into play.

All I addressed were normal or acceptable running temperatures.

As for discussions, this would be hijacking Bealer46's thread.

Edited by dc3, 07 September 2010 - 11:00 PM.

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#11 MrBruce1959

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 11:32 PM

Interesting I was just referring to this phenomenon in another topic.

Why would a processor temperature go up during idle computer time, but decrease once the computer is put through some stress?

I have considered the Windows idle process and the indexing feature built into windows XP and up, but I do not believe these processes would cause that much heat to be generated when there is much more going on when a video game is being played such as WOW.

I think I may start doing some research and do a study on the cause, because I have been seeing this stated in a lot of threads in this forum lately.

Computers seem to crash more often when idle then they do when playing graphic intensive video games. :thumbsup:

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#12 Broni

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 11:57 PM

I can't see, how it'd be a hijacking, if we're still referring to the OP's original question.

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#13 bealer46

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 12:39 AM

broni would you please tell us about your machine and how do you keep your cpu so cool? what thermal grease do you use.i too would like my cpu to operate that cool.although 45c to 50c is within my cpu's operating range, the cooler the better

#14 DickNervous

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 09:32 AM

Assuming that we are talking about air cooling, under normal operating conditions, an idle CPU should only be 2-5C above the ambient room temperature, or 1-2C above the air temperature INSIDE the case. Proper cooling is the key here, as airflow needs to be adequate to cool not only the CPU, but the HDD, GPU, RAM, and chipset (the PSU normally has it's own fan to keep it cool). Ideally this would mean that there is an air intake fan in the lower-front of the case and an exhaust fan either in the top or upper-rear of the case causing cool air to come in and go across all the major components. Depending upon the case and the individual components there are countless ways to achieve this goal.

As for thermal paste, I have always recommended and used Arctic Silver AS5. Be sure that you clean off all old thermal paste from the CPU and heat sink (use rubbing alcohol and a lint free cloth) before applying new thermal paste and do not put too much. You only need a razor thin application of paste to assist in transferring the heat.

#15 MrBruce1959

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 10:35 AM

Thanks for your input DickNervous.

I agree with your suggestions and at the same time I will answer a questions posted by bealer46 that was originally pointed at Broni.

bealer46 I will tell you about my computer setup on the machine I am presently using.

My present computer tower is a full sized tower.

Here is what I have for fans in my computer case.

I have one cooling fan located in the tower's front panel blowing into the computer case directly pointed at the the three hard drives I have. This was one I added to the case.

I have one cooling fan located on the side of my tower, this one blows cool air directly at the processor cooling fan and the North Bridge heat sink. This is one I added to the computer case.

I have my Processor cooling fan blowing at the heat sink, some people prefer this cooling fan to be an exhaust and takes air away, being that the motherboard in my case is vertical and not horizontal, this is a more effective way of pushing heat away, rather than pulling it away.

My computers case has two exhaust cooling fans on the back panel.

The power supply which is located at the towers back and top area, has one input cooling fan on the bottom and the other cooling fan is the exhaust cooling fan blowing out the towers back panel.

My Nvidia 6200 AGP video card did not come with a cooling fan on the heat sink. I chose to add one by using a Pentium III heat sink cooling fan I had laying around. I altered the heat sink fins a bit to accommodate the cooling fan screws. This fan is set as exhaust and is powered by one of the spare motherboard case fan power sockets.

Using HWMonitor
My processor is showing 146 degrees F right now.
Video card is 107 degrees.
Room temperature is presently 80 degrees.

My processor is an AMD Athlon XP 2400+ presently set at 2000 MHz.

I could go to the next CPU clock frequency of 2500 MHz in my BIOS, but I firmly believe I would most likely cause possible damage to my processor, so I have never attempted trying this.

My system has never faced a shut down or restart issue in the 3 years I have been using it and believe me, I have put my computer through some intensive 3-D gaming.

3DMark has given me some high ratings for such an old computer setup.

My motherboard is an Asus A7V8X with 3 GB of DDR Memory.

This is one of 5 computers I use on a regular basis, but his one is the main one I do most of my computing on.

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Edited by MrBruce1959, 09 September 2010 - 10:36 AM.

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