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Computer power problem


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#1 k33ba

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Posted 04 September 2010 - 12:39 PM

Hi,

Recently my brothers computer was working fine, he shut it down and the next down it wouldnt start up. When u press the power button a green light on the case blinks once then nothing. The powersupply fan doesent move or anything...no activity at all.

I have a couple different power supplys lying around so tried different ones, different wall sockets and different power cables...same thing happens with all of them. I havent got vast hardware knowledge so this has kinda left my a bit stumped now so any advice on what to do next would be greatly appreciated

Thanks,
K33BA

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#2 MrBruce1959

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Posted 04 September 2010 - 01:09 PM

Providing us with some information on you computer make and model number, would help us to help you better.

Bruce.
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#3 k33ba

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Posted 04 September 2010 - 01:53 PM

Its a custom built PC that a friend did a while back. The information i can see at first glance is

Mobo: Gigabyte GA-8N Sli Pro
ram: 2x 2GB crucial memory
hdd: seagate barracuda 7200 250gb

ill try get the cpu model and gfx card soon but the fans being a bit fiddly to remove at the moment.

The computers been working for probably around 4 years now, this is first time ive encountered a hardware problem with it really.

#4 k33ba

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 03:55 PM

bump


could still use some help with this problem

#5 dpunisher

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 04:51 PM

That board is at the age where you need to check your capacitors for bulges/leaks. I think that board was made before the move to polymer caps on mid/high end boards. Focus on caps near the CPU first. I had one system 18 months old with bulged caps.

http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5

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#6 dc3

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 07:52 PM

If the PSU isn't spinning up, then you can do a test to determine if the problem is with the PSU or the motherboard. The motherboard initiates the PSU to turn on, so if this fails the PSU won't spin up. This test will help determine if this is the problem.

The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test the PSU.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

At this point you can use a DC Voltage meter to read the different rail Voltages. You will want to insert the black probe into any of the Black (-) sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the five different colored sockets, one at a time. Below are the five different colors and their corresponding rail voltages. The Voltages should be within about ten percent plus or minus of the given values.

Yellow +12VDC

Blue -12VDC

Red +5VDC

White -5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.

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#7 MrBruce1959

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 11:07 PM

Along with the very useful information dpunisher and dc3 have provided, this web site also has its wealth in useful trouble-shooting procedures and information.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/home/index.html

Bruce.
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