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Murder by Malware: Can a Computer Virus Kill?


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#1 KarstenHansen

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 06:45 PM

Can malware kill? It can cause massive damages that on a dramatic day might lead you to say something like, "This %*^@# is killing me!" Computer viruses can also induce those feelings, because you might be "free" 24/7 family tech support, and must deal with family members who refuse to take care of their computers and keep infecting their systems until it needs to be reformatted. Some people may feel like they want to die when malicious software manages to infect online banks and empty out accounts.

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#2 helloyo53

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 07:12 PM

That is pretty interesting. It would really be bad though if something like a life support machine was affected with a virus. Thanks for the read.

-Brandon

#3 KarstenHansen

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 10:57 AM

Yep, that is also one of the ares where VIRA is even more bad. Infecting machines taking care of people's lives! Totally insane.

#4 CStew23

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Posted 04 September 2010 - 01:08 PM

That is very interesting. Some people will never learn though and just keep getting infected
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#5 KarstenHansen

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Posted 05 September 2010 - 07:06 AM

We can ONLY blame malware programmers, not normal users, as they dont stand a chance against this kind of professional IT personel. We need a change in what people think it is okay to do to a fellow PC user. Some honor maybe. I just think, how can they look themselves in the mirror in the morning?

Edited by KarstenHansen, 05 September 2010 - 07:07 AM.


#6 JonM33

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 08:15 AM

That is pretty interesting. It would really be bad though if something like a life support machine was affected with a virus. Thanks for the read.

-Brandon


Considering that I have been working in a hospital for the past 2 weeks trying to help them recover from a virus that infected half of their computer systems...I will speak up here.

Most medical systems (life support, etc) are going to be separate from your typical e-mail/internet network that nurses/doctors use that become infected. There are some that have clients on regular computers and can be affected though. The major one that I have seen is an application that is used to track patient medication. That client requires fingerprint authentication and only works internally.

I really think the hospital I work at lacks common sense with it's IA and higher level management. They allow general logins (as opposed to individual) for computer access, full local admin rights for these general accounts and even USB flash drive access. As patient care has been moved more and more digitally, more strict security policies should be put in place. The issue is with the higher level management, they just aren't computer people. They are people with management degrees that are put in charge but have no real understanding of technology and how much it has advanced. Even the VP of IT is clueless. One of them recommended moving to Macs which would merely drive up considerable cost and not work properly on a Windows domain, not to mention the fact that the patient care software isn't designed for Macs.

I think the direct patient care systems should be completely secured from top to bottom. The AV solution they used (Trend Micro) should be replaced as it has failed them repeatedly. It cost them considerable money in the contractors like myself that they had to bring in for manpower. It cost them ability to do patient care effectively. We worked 24/7 with 12 hour shifts to try to contain the problem. They weren't even organized on a solution to resolve the issue - going from trying to clean the computers to re-imaging them instead. It was a catastrophe and showed just how poorly organized they were. They brought in non-technical volunteers and project coordinators to try to help - most of whom just got in the way.

Edited by JonM33, 06 September 2010 - 08:17 AM.





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