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turning GB size photo into KB sized photo


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#1 theplywoodviolin

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 03:12 AM

Hi. I'm not very experienced with photo editing so I hope that someone can help me with this.

Is there any way that I can resize an image from 1GB to about 600KB using photo editing software?

Thanks.

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#2 Vaerli

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 12:36 PM

Yeah, you can. I'm not sure how you get a 1GB image in the first place, unless you mean 1MB. You have to scale down the quality, pixel dimensions, or both to get a smaller filesize.

What photo editing program are you using?

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#3 helloyo53

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 07:05 PM

Hello.

A 1GB photo would be pretty large, so I'm thinking you mean 1MB. I downloaded a program, called Image Resize Powertoys (it's by Microsoft), to resize the pixel dimensions, and it is SUPER easy to use. Once it is installed, you just right click on the photo you want resized, and there should be an option that says "resize photo". Click on that, and then choose the dimensions you want the photo to be. Using that program, I am able to resize a 4.07MB photo that is 3648x2736 down to a 32.4KB photo that is 640x480 (of course, you can choose your own dimensions).

So just click here to download that program.

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#4 Platypus

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 07:34 PM

A large (e.g. A4) image scanned at high resolution can be that size. I think it's unlikely that plywoodviolin is asking how to reduce a 1MB file to 600KB.

If the original image is actually 1GB, reduction to under 1MB is a big ask.

Basically the size of a stored image can be reduced by lowering the resolution, or using higher compression. Either way will involve considerable loss of image quality to reduce the file size by this amount.

theplywoodviolin (may I call you tpv?), could you confirm the 1GB file size for us, and explain a little more detail of the image involved?

For example, if it is a high resolution scan, you can use photo editing software to resample to a lower resolution, but it could give a better result if it's possible to rescan the original using the lower resolution. What type of file is the original - e.g. TIF, RAW etc?

If the resolution is vital, maybe to allow the image to be enlarged greatly, then reducing it to a small file size will lose so much quality as to make it useless for the purpose. But if for example you just want to be able to email a small version of the image to someone as a sample, you could use the editing software to resample to, say, 10% of the resolution, reducing the size to around 10MB, then save it as a .JPG, setting the compression to get the final filesize you want.

Edited by Platypus, 30 August 2010 - 07:38 PM.

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#5 Torvald

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 09:29 PM

If you have MS Office installed on your computer, it will also have a handy bunch of additional programs in a submenu called Microsoft Office Tools.

One of those programs, called Microsft Office Picture Manager, is an easy to use program which includes the ability to compress images.

I use it myself to quickly compress the pictures taken by my digital camera whenever I need to post copies of them on websites, as it very considerably saves on memory size without appearing to cause picture quality degradation.

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#6 denako

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 03:48 PM

Resizing the image, changing the extension, and reducing quality can help lower the file size, but I don't think you can go from 1 GB to 1 MB that easily. But you will definetely see a difference in the file size after these modifications.
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#7 fEsTiDiOuS

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 03:22 PM

I've got the same problem.  I have a 300Mb PNG that I'd like to scale down to a size that can be opened in a web browser.  A huge loss of resolution is perfectly fine; especially compared to not being able to do anything with it. :-)



#8 Martel

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 04:03 PM

I will happily adjust that image. If you know the dimensions I will change it for you.

#9 saluqi

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 07:34 PM

IrfanView can easily "resample" an image to any desired pixel count.  I use it daily for that purpose.  I shoot full-frame DSLR (Nikon D600) at the "fine" resolution setting of 6016 x 4016 pixels, at 24 bit color depth ("16 million colors").  The resulting JPEG files are about 12-13 MB in size, just too big to send as E-mail attachments (RAW files are much bigger, that's a whole 'nother story).  I routinely downsize the JPEGs to say 1600 x 1068 pixels, resulting in a file size of around 320-350 KB.  You can send quite a few of those attached to one e-mail message.  The difference in quality is essentially not noticeable on a computer screen (unless you have a large photo-specialty monitor).  Print production or publication is of course a different matter.  I never send out full-resolution pictures (until paid for, that is <G>).  Most E-mail servers seem to have a 10 MB limit for attachments to one message - so if you do need to share full-size image files, Dropbox works well.  I've learned, moreover, that even the glossy magazines often don't want to deal with photo files bigger than a megabyte or so.  A JPEG file 4512 x 3012 - that's 3/4 of the original linear dimensions - is only 1.16 MB in size, or about 1/10 of the original file size (the file sizes vary a bit depending on the distribution of colors in the image).  Note this is not cropping but "resampling" of the entire original image at 3/4 scale.  The magic of the compression algorithm is such that a 44% reduction in pixel count yields a 90% reduction in file size.  My magazine editors love it <G>.

 

You can do the same thing with Photoshop, of course, with more bells and whistles, but IrfanView is so quick and easy (and amazingly capable) that I find myself using that most of the time.  

 

Of course, never overwrite the original image file with a reduced-size copy.  To avoid that I always create a separate subfolder for the copies, AND distinguish them by adding letters to the end of the file name.  That way, even if I save them into the wrong folder by mistake, I don't overwrite anything.

 

Being a control freak, I avoid programs that re-size pictures automatically when you send them in E-mail.  It takes only seconds to resize images in IrfanView, and then I know exactly what I did and what the recipient is going to see.



#10 fEsTiDiOuS

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 08:23 PM

Thank you Martel. That is very kind. Here is a link to the image:

 

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B8xLerz_gYO2X1VfV1NFZ0RmLWM

 

I still would like to know how to resize such a large image... 

 

 

I tried the ImageMagick convert command line tool (convert --resize 10% I_Prefer_Pi,png), it filled over 90Gb of swap space and quit with the error message "convert: IDAT: Too much image data". 

 

Saluqi; I will give IrfanView a try; I've used it once or twice; it's definitely worth a shot.  Any program that tries to display the image on the screen I fear will fail though;  I suspect that only a program purpose built to handle large images without using obscene amounts of swap and ram will have any luck with such a large image.

 

 - Thank you.


Edited by fEsTiDiOuS, 15 January 2017 - 09:58 PM.


#11 Martel

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 08:50 PM

That link does not show an image.

 

Put it on one of your web pages or photo bucket or the likes.

 

In PaintdotNet  you would choose resize and pick your size. (see example below).

quinton_1.jpg

 

IrfanView can easily "resample" an image to any desired pixel count. .


Edited by Martel, 15 January 2017 - 09:29 PM.


#12 fEsTiDiOuS

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 01:51 AM

That link is to a three hundred megabyte PNG image.  It's way too big to be opened by a web browser, it would just crash.  - That is the problem the original poster and I are having.  We have image files that are so large they can't be opened, we need to resize the image so that it can be used.



#13 Platypus

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 05:45 AM

Is there any way that I can resize an image from 1GB to about 600KB


No, not whilst preserving any reasonable semblance of the original image, unless the image is of something fairly simple but recorded at an absurdly high resolution.
  

image files that are so large they can't be opened


What is a typical image of?

Even the 283MB .png sample contains an image occupying approximately 58GB of space, it is 170532 x 84944 pixels! Assuming scaling, a 1GB .png would have an image size of around 200GB!

Edited by Platypus, 16 January 2017 - 05:50 AM.

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#14 Platypus

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 07:36 AM

It's possible gigapixel processing software that handles images in chunks could help:

http://www.vips.ecs.soton.ac.uk/index.php?title=VIPS

could be worth looking at?
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