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Slow Running and random switch-off of computer


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#1 Jonboy134

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 02:07 PM

I have recently encountered a problem with my computer where it is running extremely slow, sometimes taking 30 minutes just to boot up. it also repeatedly freezes and will randomly turn off for no apparent reason.

The operating sytem I am running is Windows XP.

Any assisstance with this problem would be much appreciated.

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 02:35 PM

System manufacturer and model?

Have you tried a different PSU?

Any onscreen error messages that relate?

Louis

#3 Jonboy134

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 02:40 PM

It is an IQon system (phillips) and there are no error messages at all just switches off. occassionally it says system recovered from serious error.
Could a virus or something be causing this problem?

#4 CohenTheBarbarian

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 04:07 PM

Download and burn a copy of this:

http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/


Boot it up - you may have to press a key for a boot menu or go into the bios and change the system settings to boot the optical drive before the hard drive.

From the menu, go to "Memory" and run memtest86+. Let that go for at least one complete pass- may take hours. If there are errors, it'll let you know. If it fails, or reboots, or does anything odd, post back here.

If there are no errors, restart, boot it up again, go the "HDD" menu and find the appropriate diagnostic for your brand of hard drive, and run it. See if it checks out.

If the machine makes it through both of those with no errors, it may be time to look into malware issues.

#5 Jonboy134

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Posted 26 August 2010 - 02:53 PM

Am currently running this as suggested. What do I have to do if it identifies errors?

#6 Clifford Tan

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Posted 27 August 2010 - 06:34 PM

(1)Regarding your bootup issue, I've put up some ways that will help speed up your boot time and also improve performance of your computer. It works well with XP. http://www.pcoptimizationsecrets.com/artic...uter-go-faster/

(2) Having the computer to freeze repeatedly and shutdown itself, it's either the hardware conflict issue that windows decided to shutdown or corrupted registries.
What I suggest is use the manufacturer hardware diagnostic disk and they can tell you which hardware fails. Most branded computer will provide one, otherwise you can download from their website. If

(3) Otherwise I would recommend that you check your windows registry with one of these registry software that automatically fix your computer and usually the problem will go ahead. Please bear in mind that for the software to work, you will have to regularly run it or set a task scheduler to maintain and keep your windows registry in good shape. Here's a few that I've reviewed, hope it helps
http://www.pcoptimizationsecrets.com/artic...oftware-review/

rgds,
Clifford
~ Clifford The IT Guy ~
PC Optimization Secrets

#7 hamluis

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Posted 27 August 2010 - 06:41 PM

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

• Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.

• Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

• Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.

• Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.

• The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.
•Ed Bott's Webog: Why I don’t use registry cleaners•Do I need a Registry Cleaner?
CODE
Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.

Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.

Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.

The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.Louis

#8 dc3

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Posted 27 August 2010 - 06:46 PM

(3) Otherwise I would recommend that you check your windows registry with one of these registry software that automatically fix your computer and usually the problem will go ahead. Please bear in mind that for the software to work, you will have to regularly run it or set a task scheduler to maintain and keep your windows registry in good shape. Here's a few that I've reviewed, hope it helps
http://www.pcoptimizationsecrets.com/artic...oftware-review/

rgds,
Clifford


Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications. There are a number of them available and some are safer than others. Keep in mind that no two registry cleaners work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad" entry. One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause a problem when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

Having added that, I will also suggest this. The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results". Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.

I have to agree for the moment with running the Memtest, RAM issues can and will cause this type of problem. If the memtest comes up clean, then we can look at other causes.

Just a small point here, for the best results of this test, the longer it runs the more accurate the results will be. I would also suggest that if you have more than on module that you test them one at a time.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#9 Jonboy134

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 03:31 PM

Have completed the memtest86+ scan and it has identified errors. What should i do now? am a bit lost with all this?

#10 hamluis

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 06:31 PM

You tested the RAM modules...individually, together, and with each module in each RAM slot on the motherboard?

You may get some ideas from http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=409152.

Louis

#11 Jonboy134

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 03:28 PM

ok, have done that and errors are identified. does this mean that I need to replace the RAM?

#12 CohenTheBarbarian

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 02:41 PM

How many RAM chips do you have?

Run the test with each installed, one by one - identify the ones that are failing. If you have just one chip, then yes, you will need to replace it.

What's the manufacturer and model number of your PC?

#13 hamluis

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 02:54 PM

Errors can be indicative of 3 things, IME:

a. Problem with the RAM module.

b. Problem due to RAM slot on motherboard.

c. Problem due to motherboard speed for RAM.

Louis




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