Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Intel to buy security co. McAfee in $7.68B deal


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Union_Thug

Union_Thug

    Bleeps with the fishes...


  • Members
  • 2,355 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:is everything
  • Local time:07:26 AM

Posted 19 August 2010 - 09:34 AM

NEW YORK -- Intel Corp. said Thursday it is buying computer-security software maker McAfee Inc. for $7.68 billion as the chip-maker adds to its arsenal of tools to serve an increasing array of Internet-connected devices, including mobile phones.

The $48-per-share price represents a 60 percent premium over McAfee's Wednesday close of $29.93. McAfee shares surged 58 percent after the deal was announced Thursday to hit $47.14 in morning trading. Intel shares slipped 59 cents, or 3 percent, to $19.

Intel, which is based in Santa Clara, Calif., said security is now a fundamental component of online computing, but today's approach to security isn't adequate for the growing availability of Internet connections on mobile phones, medical devices, ATMs, automobiles and elsewhere.

The industry needs a new approach that combines software, hardware and services to meet tomorrow's needs, the company said.


More at link @ WaPo: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/conte...?wpisrc=nl_tech

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Animal

Animal

    Bleepin' Animinion


  • Site Admin
  • 34,563 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Where You Least Expect Me To Be
  • Local time:04:26 AM

Posted 19 August 2010 - 11:53 AM

More from McAfee themselves: http://newsroom.mcafee.com/article_display...article_id=3678

The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." Douglas Adams (1952-2001)


"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein (1879-1955)


Follow BleepingComputer on: Facebook | Twitter | Google+

#3 sh4rkbyt3

sh4rkbyt3

  • Members
  • 394 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:26 AM

Posted 21 September 2010 - 08:33 PM

I've tried to ponder the reasoning for this by Intel and it still makes absolutely no sense. Almost 100% of the retail PC's come with Norton installed, of those, less than 50% ever actually pay for a subscription after their 30 day trial runs out. That leaves plenty of room for sales and growth by AV companies but McAfee? It's been one of, if not the worst, available AV programs since it's existed. I mean if it were me and I was trying to make an inroad I would have bought Symantec/Norton or another reputable company....NOT McAfee lol.

#4 JonM33

JonM33

  • Banned
  • 503 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:26 AM

Posted 23 September 2010 - 10:00 PM

^^^Not really. Dells come with McAfee Security Center pre-installed. Acers come with McAfee Internet Security Suite pre-installed. Those are two MAJOR OEM brands.

HP does use Norton though.

McAfee is actually HUGE in the corporate/enterprise environment. They acquired many major business level information security companies such as SiteAdvisor, SafeBoot, Secure Computing and IronMail.

#5 sh4rkbyt3

sh4rkbyt3

  • Members
  • 394 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:26 AM

Posted 02 October 2012 - 11:38 AM

And I've yet to see them installed in the Corporate world on any of the networks or systems I've worked on. I'm sure it exists somewhere but not anywhere I've ever seen. Clients include a few major insurance companies , 2 very large bank systems and numerous small private companies.

It's also one of the most removed pieces of software that I know of according to tech responses.

#6 the_patriot11

the_patriot11

    High Tech Redneck


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,755 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wyoming USA
  • Local time:04:26 AM

Posted 02 October 2012 - 07:00 PM

I personally, would take mcafee over anything made by symantec any day. It catches a lot more, uses less system resources, and you can actually uninstall it without having to download a special software program. With that being said, theres better out there, if I had to pay for a AV, it would be ESET. I see this as being a smart move on intels part.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#7 lti

lti

  • Members
  • 581 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:26 AM

Posted 03 October 2012 - 08:59 PM

McAfee uses more resources than any antivirus software I have seen. It does have a higher detection rate than Norton, but the newer versions of Norton have very low resource use.

#8 the_patriot11

the_patriot11

    High Tech Redneck


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,755 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wyoming USA
  • Local time:04:26 AM

Posted 03 October 2012 - 10:10 PM

lol you must have some weird software, ive never seen mcafee even use half the resources norton does. Course, its been awhile since ive used either, but when Ive tested them in the past, norton has always used twice the resources for half the work. and even if it did, I would rather use more resources, and find more malware. Detection is always the first prioirity, how well it detects. Resource management is number to. Who cares how small a footprint it uses if it doesnt detect anything. Of course, its nice to have both, but if I couldnt, I will take the better detection hands down anyday.

Edited by the_patriot11, 03 October 2012 - 10:12 PM.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#9 spc3rd

spc3rd

  • Members
  • 292 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Mid-Atlantic region (USA)
  • Local time:07:26 AM

Posted 04 October 2012 - 06:42 AM

Good morning everyone,

Detection is always the first prioirity, how well it detects. Resource management is number to.


patriot_11 makes a couple of quite valid points here. I once used McAfee (provided free by my ISP) for about 2 years...until there came a time my computer managed to get infected 4 times in a 6-week period. McAfee (for me) did tend to be a system resource hog and significantly slowed-down my machine's performance.

I subsequently decided to acquire another AV Suite application, as well as, MBAM Pro, using SAS (on-demand) & Spywareblaster. For me...I've thus far not experienced any major issues. Of course,...as everyone here already knows...no single AV program (or suite) is going to catch every single piece of malware floating around out there.

Might I also suggest visiting the McAfee Community Forums? It's one source of being able to review what McAfee users are saying themselves.

Best regards to everyone & thank you for your time! :busy:

spc3rd

Dell Optiplex 755 Desktop | Win 7 Pro, SP 1, 64-bit | Intel Core 2 Duo, 3.00 gHz CPU | 8 GB RAM | 400 GB Seagate SATA HDD | Outpost Security Suite Pro | MBAM Premium 2.0 | Spywareblaster | SAS (on-demand) | Blocklist Pro | IE 11 & FF w/ NoScript | Disconnect | Adblock Plus | Flagfox


#10 sh4rkbyt3

sh4rkbyt3

  • Members
  • 394 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:26 AM

Posted 14 July 2013 - 01:51 AM

Well here we are almost 3 years later and this acquisition still makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. And at this point McAfee is by far one of the worst possible AV programs you could possibly use.

I'm pretty sure whoever at Intel made that decision is probably at a new job with another company by this point lol.

Everyone has their personal preferences of AV programs that works for them which is normal in todays world of selectable choices unlike what it was say 10 or 15 yrs ago. And spc3rd makes the point that I've been saying for years, which is to layer your security!!!

We all (hopefully) know by now that a single program, be it a malware detector, AV program or firewall alone is not going to cover you very well or for very long. One must also understand that close to 90% of the possible infections STILL are a result of users allowing infected downloads into their machines. Even with the rapid advance of Ransomware in the last few years onto the playing field, users themselves are the main cause of their own problems.

I don't claim to be an expert or l33t but I have read and learned quite a bit over the last 30 years. I also use VMware to test different products from time to time and allow infections into my virtual machine to test those that work and those that don't. The one constant over the numerous years though has been the lack of response form the computer industry to teach users good security practices. You may (at best) get some woefully inadequate general security breifing with your new computer but is it really enough to tell the untrained owner what to watch out for? Hardly!

In my small side business, I take the extra time to show people what to watch out for, how infections can occur and replicate, and then show them what to do if it happens. I would say out of the hundreds I've shown over the years I've only gotten less than 4% call back within a 2-3 yr period which tells me users want to know but feel overwhelmed with the plethora of what's out there. Now I can't show them every single thing but I can surely show them the basics and a few tricks that will help to keep their ID and info secure on their system. And as a beginner with BASIC back in 1982, I feel as though it's my duty in a sense because if we don't know one will.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users