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Okay, computer starts...now what : )


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9 replies to this topic

#1 IPT

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 12:50 AM

Okay, so I built my first computer, and it starts! Now I am a little overwhelmed at what to do next (it asked for a boot CD - and if I rememeber correct finally failed - as expected). It's an Intel i7 930 CPU with Giagabyte GA X58A UD3R mobo. I have the Nvidea 250 graphics card, and a new copy of the OEM Windows 7 Hm premium. I have three HDs installed all with SATA 3, and a DVD drive. The HDs are (2) x 500Gb and 1x1TB. One 500GB for programs/OS, one 500GB for scratch and "page files" (?), and the 1TB for storage (I'll be backing that up to an external drive).

The user manual for the mobo is a bit overwheleming so I thought I would come to the people who know this stuff! I understand that I need to partition the HDs somehow, and of course instal the OS. I am sort of stumped at even where to start. A lot of the build websites just sort of stop at firing it up. Any links or help would be much appreciated!

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#2 RainbowSix

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 01:42 AM

There is no need to partition your hard drives if you plan to use an entire one for a Windows installation.
Just put the Windows DVD in the DVD drive when you turn on the computer.

Edited by RainbowSix, 18 August 2010 - 01:42 AM.

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#3 dc3

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 02:40 AM

If you only had the one hdd there would be an advantage of installing two partitions. If you put the operating system on one partition and your data on a second you won't lose any of your data if you have to reinstall the operating system.

In your case, all you need to do is make sure that your optical drive is the first device in the boot order of the BIOS, place the installation CD in the drive and reboot to boot from the CD. You will need your twenty five alphanumeric product code, so keep that handy.

Paul Thurrot has an excellent guide for installing Windows 7, it even has pictures to help you. You can read it here.

Edited by dc3, 18 August 2010 - 10:08 AM.

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#4 dpunisher

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 05:21 AM

Just follow RainbowSix's advice. Boot up. Make sure your CD/DVD is selected as primary boot device and follow directions. Select one of your 500gig drives to install the OS on and go from there. You will partition/format your other drives after you install the OS.

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#5 IPT

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 12:37 AM

Thanks - ran the disc from the DVD. I'll read that posted link to see if it answers my question, but here it goes anyway. (this should probably go in another forum but since this thread is started and it's relevant I'll start here).

Windows 7 is new to me. Anyway, after running the W7 disc, custom install, choose one of the 500GB HDs. All is well except, when I go to "my computer" there is only the "C" drive listed under "hard discs". For removable storage there is a floppy drive "A" listed (don't have one) and the DVD drive. After a right click on the "A drive" under "properties">Hardware all three of the drives, the "floppy disk drive" and the DVD drive are listed.

How do I set it up so I have the usual C, D, E drive listings under my computer?

Edited by IPT, 19 August 2010 - 12:55 AM.


#6 RainbowSix

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 01:03 AM

Start, right-click Computer, Manage, Disk Management
You will be able to format your (currently) unused hard drives from there. It will let you choose the letter to use.

You may be able to remove the floppy icon by disabling the floppy controller in your BIOS.

Unrelated:
Now that you're in Windows, you may want to install speedfan to make sure your system is properly cooled.

Edited by RainbowSix, 19 August 2010 - 01:10 AM.

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#7 IPT

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 01:07 AM

sweet - thanks - one more question (for now (LOL)). The intents of this computer is to be offline and as unencumberred as possible for editing large digital photos. I was not going to put any anti-virus software on there to stop the inevitable background running and slowing down things. The ONLY time this will be exposed to anything online would be to upgrade or install an Adobe product or a driver of some sort. No "surfing", I have a rig for that. Is that a bad idea to do this?

Edited by IPT, 19 August 2010 - 01:09 AM.


#8 RainbowSix

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 02:40 AM

It would be a good idea to at least install Microsoft Security Essentials. You never know when something will sneak in via USB flash drive or whatever.
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#9 hamluis

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 11:12 PM

To emphasize Rainbow's point...I was infected with the Blaster Worm (only infection I ever had since 1996) during a situation where I had decided to do a clean install of XP. All files had loaded, system booted. I decided that I would go to WUS first before doing anything else. At the time, there was no Windows firewall, so I was using Kerio's firewall and I did not bother to set it up. Blaster struck my system as I was going to Windows Update. Total time: a matter of a few seconds.

Install an AV, use a firewall...whether you ever connect to the Internet or not. These are basic security devices...and the Internet is not the only possible source of infection, just the busiest :thumbsup:.

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#10 JonM33

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Posted 20 August 2010 - 09:03 AM

Start, right-click Computer, Manage, Disk Management
You will be able to format your (currently) unused hard drives from there. It will let you choose the letter to use.

You may be able to remove the floppy icon by disabling the floppy controller in your BIOS.

Unrelated:
Now that you're in Windows, you may want to install speedfan to make sure your system is properly cooled.


Windows 7 is a bit more intuitive than that. No need to go into the Computer Management MMC.

Just press the Windows button on your keyboard and type in "Disk Management". You will notice Create and format hard disk partitions show up (via Control Panel). Other searches will bring it up too, such as "format" or "format disk". Click on that and it opens the Disk Management console. Windows 7 is much easier for the normal user to use. :thumbsup:




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