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Titanus Computers as DAW


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#1 RockerBug17

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 12:40 PM

Hello. I've been toying with the idea of purchasing a laptop for audio applications (Notation software, Sampling, MIDI, Digital Audio Recording). Titanus Computers' Laptop workstations look like they would work perfectly for what I want to do. Performance is #1 on my list and I'm not quiet sure if some of the upgrades are worth the price increase. I configured the system below a Intel i5 M520, Second 320GB Hard drive, Enabled RAID 0 and a BlueRay Burner. I figure I could always opt for the base model and shop around for the upgrades I chose and install them myself. My only real concern is which processor gives a performance increase proportionate to the extra price?

Any opinions on this machine, or others, are very much welcome.

http://www.titanuscomputers.com/ProductDet...ductCode=W870CU

Edited by RockerBug17, 16 August 2010 - 12:43 PM.


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#2 toop4

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 06:17 PM

It looks like a solid machine. The i7 is definitely faster, (well depending on what one you get). But you probably won't need it, unless you have the money...

Getting an SSD will be a better buy than getting an i7 with 8GB ram. SSDs have less capacity, but run a lot faster. It'd be a good idea to get an SSD to put the OS on, etc. Then get a, say 500GB HDD for storage.

#3 RockerBug17

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 09:41 AM

Correct me if I'm wrong, but if I had RAID 0 my files would essentially be split between the two drive making access times faster? Would a SSD trump a RAID 0 setup? And what about data loss on an SSD, is it recoverable?

Edited by RockerBug17, 18 August 2010 - 09:54 AM.


#4 toop4

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 05:41 PM

There isn't that much of a speed difference between RAID and hard drives. For the most part, SSDs have a longer life span than traditional hard drives. Also, SSDs are a lot faster than hard drives, that's the benefit of having an SSD rather than a HHD (hard drive). RAID is mostly used to create a redundancy for hard drive failures.

So if you're paranoid about your data, using RAID would be good, the downside to that is that it won't be as quick. If you're not paranoid, an SSD is more beneficial (for speed). Just make sure you backup your data, just in case!
:blink:

#5 RockerBug17

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 08:02 PM

Today was the first time I had ever heard of SSDs. Needless to say the online demos are impressive. I did research and found a lot of info. I've read that the writing capacity is slower than a traditional HHD and the overall number of writes is much more limited. This depends upon whether a MLC or SLC drive is used. Throw in dollars per GB ratio compared to a traditional HHD and SSD look like they need a little more time before they are accessible to the general population. Good thing we computer junkies aren't so general, lol. I WANT ONE!!!

I browsed around for the SSDs offered in the configuration of the laptop I posted earlier and found the 80GB Intel X25-M cheaper to buy afterward and install myself. I tried the same thing for the processor, RAM and video card. I want to say that if I were to buy the default model of the laptop posted earlier that it would be more cost effective to make the upgrades they offer myself.

Any opinion on that subject?

#6 toop4

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 08:33 PM

Yeah, you have to think that for everything you customize, they have to pay someone to put it together. If you feel comfortable with upgrading components in a laptop, you probably can. I personally, for laptops, like for them to do it. On a desktop, I would, or even have my uncle do it. It shouldn't be that cheaper to do it yourself, though.

Most of the time for laptops you can't upgrade the processor, and more often than not, the video card too.




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