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Stuck on bang-for-buck


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#1 afunyun

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 12:20 PM

Hello,

I'm gathering the parts for a new build and I'm stuck on two different configurations.

The difference is either going with an i5 760 + EVGA P55 SLI mobo, or an i7 930 + EVGA X58 SLI LE mobo.

All other components are pretty much the same, Corsair 650TX power, EVGA GTX 460 1GB, G.Skill 4GB Ripjaw RAM, etc.

The i5 build comes to about $1100 total, and the i7 comes to about $1200 total.

Which one is better bang for buck, as well as better future-proofing? (Another question, will the 650TX be enough for SLI 460's?)

Thanks

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 02:13 PM

No such thing as "future-proofing" if you mean anything other than "will my hardware work years for now?", IMO.

At this moment...every new hardware component that was sold last week...has already been superceded by at least one planned new model. To confirm this pattern, all you have to do is go back 1 year or 2 years, using Google...and note the "hot, new hardware" then that many users would not think of purchasing today.

And...if you are a gamer, the cycle speeds up, IMO (I am not a gamer).

I think that purchasing components comes down to...user knowing how long he/she intends to utilize the system components...before getting the urge to replace the components. Just because we...like new things.

Example: P4s are still capable of running most of the programs we use today (except for games) but I don't think any of us are rushing out to buy P4s in 2010.

What do you do on your system...that commands the power that you have in mind? Do you game?

Louis

#3 afunyun

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 06:46 PM

Yes, I intend to do a good amount of gaming on it, eventually going SLI, as well as doing a lot of programming and design work on it.

I am keeping the budget at or under $1200 by the way.

#4 dpunisher

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 01:09 AM

With either socket you will be "state of the art" for about another 12-15 months. After that, it gets murky. Intel may slip on the Sandy Bridge release, it is too early to tell.

If you don't plan to upgrade CPUs anytime soon, a P55 board and an overclocked CPU would be a happy setup. For all purposes an LGA 1156 CPU is a fast as any LGA 1366 CPU clock for clock. If you are set on running SLI, I would lean towards a 1366/X58 setup just for the PCI bus bandwidth. You are going to take a very slight hit running SLI on a P55 chipset board.

If you plan on one more future CPU upgrade, X58 boards can run the new 6 core CPUs (possibly 8 core CPUs in the future?). There will be a low/mid range 6 core CPU released soon.

Oh, you will need a 3 channel RAM setup for that X58 board (3X2gig), not 4 gigs.

EDIT: A TX650 will power it, but it will be running at nearly 80% load with an SLI setup and an i7 930. Estimate 160 watts/card, plus 140+ watts for the CPU overclocked, plus an addl 30 watts for the system. Figure about 500 watts loaded and any overclocking of the video cards will drive that up by quite a bit. That would put it slightly out of my self imposed comfort zone of 60%.

EDIT 2: If "Band for the Buck" was primary, you would be looking at an AMD system. Slight chance that Bulldozer will work in AM3 socket motherboards as well.

Edited by dpunisher, 15 August 2010 - 01:24 AM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#5 afunyun

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 11:27 AM

I'm confused on the Socket 1156 vs Socket 1366 issue, because I read earlier that the new Socket 1156 i7's were outperforming some of the 1366 versions. Which one will be used in the future then?

Also I am aware of Sandy Bridge, but I will probably not upgrade to that when it first comes out because I don't like paying the full release price.

The extra PCIe bandwidth is the reason I'm even considering the Socket 1366 right now. Also hyper threading.

Also when I messed around with an AMD config there wasn't much difference in price to a comparable Intel one, and research has me concluding that the Intel will see slightly better performance right now. Though the 965 looks pretty good.

Edit: I heard that you can still use dual channel with the X58, but it wouldn't be ideal since you have the option of tri channel.

Edited by afunyun, 15 August 2010 - 11:29 AM.


#6 dpunisher

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 12:32 PM

If you look across benchmarks (take that for what its worth) 1156 and 1366 are really close and change positions on what benchie you are looking at. Having the PCI-E controller on die of the 1156 makes it look good with one videocard. Once you go SLi/Crossfire the PCI-E drops to X8 and you lose a little, not much, but a little performance compared to an X58 motherboard. The reason you get a 1366 over an 1156 is SLI/crossfire performance, memory bandwidth, and possible 6 core upgrades. LGA 1156 also support hyperthreading, except for the low end, so that's not a difference between the sockets (I do realize the CPU you selected doesn't support hyperthreading, for that you will have to pony up another $80). If 1156 was around when I built my EX58-UD4P/i7 920 setup, I would have seriously considered an 1156 setup as I find SLI/crossfire annoying (microstutter).

Strictly bang for the buck, 1156 is the better deal.

Sure you can use dual channel on an X58, but what's the point? Why cripple a system for the $40 another stick costs?

I am kind of torn on AMD builds at this point. I still think bang for the buck, you get a better deal with AMD. Not saying that is the way to go.

God, I ramble.

Which one will be used in the future? The answer is neither. Sandy Bridge is going to replace both, LGA 1155 for the mid/low end, and LGA 2011 for the high end.

Edited by dpunisher, 15 August 2010 - 12:35 PM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#7 afunyun

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 12:45 PM

True, it is only $40 bucks. For some reason I was severely misinformed about the price of triple channel, I don't know why.

Anyway, yeah I know the Socket 1156 support HT, I was talking about the 760. Edit: Which you mentioned, facepalm on my part.

The reviews on the 760/750 I've seen suggest that Price/Performance-wise, you get a better deal with them compared to a Phenom II. Just what I read, not having owned either of them yet.

Thanks for your advice

Edited by afunyun, 15 August 2010 - 12:45 PM.


#8 dpunisher

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 01:07 PM

FWIW, I think hyperthreading is at the bottom of the list of "must haves" when shopping for a CPU. It may look good in a few benchmarks, but in real world apps (gaming especially) it is essentially useless. That i7 760 is a great CPU and overclocks like mad. I wouldn't let hyperthreading be a make or break consideration.

Edited by dpunisher, 15 August 2010 - 01:07 PM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#9 JonM33

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 01:39 PM

Hello,

I'm gathering the parts for a new build and I'm stuck on two different configurations.

The difference is either going with an i5 760 + EVGA P55 SLI mobo, or an i7 930 + EVGA X58 SLI LE mobo.

All other components are pretty much the same, Corsair 650TX power, EVGA GTX 460 1GB, G.Skill 4GB Ripjaw RAM, etc.

The i5 build comes to about $1100 total, and the i7 comes to about $1200 total.

Which one is better bang for buck, as well as better future-proofing? (Another question, will the 650TX be enough for SLI 460's?)

Thanks


I'd go with the i7 930 and X58 motherboard.

The Corsair 650TX has the wattage but unfortunately only 2 pair of 6-pin PCIe connectors. Each GTX 460 will need 2 pairs so you are short. The Corsair HX650 has the same wattage but the necessary 4 pairs of 6-pin PCIe connectors.

#10 afunyun

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 01:42 PM

FWIW, I think hyperthreading is at the bottom of the list of "must haves" when shopping for a CPU. It may look good in a few benchmarks, but in real world apps (gaming especially) it is essentially useless. That i7 760 is a great CPU and overclocks like mad. I wouldn't let hyperthreading be a make or break consideration.

Oh I know, HT isn't the problem, it's PCIe bandwidth.

Hello,

I'm gathering the parts for a new build and I'm stuck on two different configurations.

The difference is either going with an i5 760 + EVGA P55 SLI mobo, or an i7 930 + EVGA X58 SLI LE mobo.

All other components are pretty much the same, Corsair 650TX power, EVGA GTX 460 1GB, G.Skill 4GB Ripjaw RAM, etc.

The i5 build comes to about $1100 total, and the i7 comes to about $1200 total.

Which one is better bang for buck, as well as better future-proofing? (Another question, will the 650TX be enough for SLI 460's?)

Thanks


I'd go with the i7 930 and X58 motherboard.

The Corsair 650TX has the wattage but unfortunately only 2 pair of 6-pin PCIe connectors. Each GTX 460 will need 2 pairs so you are short. The Corsair HX650 has the same wattage but the necessary 4 pairs of 6-pin PCIe connectors.


Thanks




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