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Repair or buy new?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 planetmolly

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 08:43 PM

My Dell XPS1530 motherboard has died after 2 short years. I feel a bit cheated, even knowing that laptops have a lesser lifespan. Dell is offering me a 2-year extended warranty at $460 that they say will cover everything and fix the motherboard. Question is - should I buy the extended warranty to fix what's broken, or should I put that money towards a new desktop that will likely have a much longer lifespan? Any thoughts/advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks,
planetmolly

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 10:59 AM

Looks like a nice laptop, designed to appeal to users who don't necessarily use or need many of the touted features.

If you feel like you will still like it in 2 years...I suggest taking the 2-year warranty coverage.

I'd take the money and apply it to building/assembling a desktop based on the premise that I will want something different in 2 years. I don't think I've ever kept the same system longer than that period of time because prices for components have steadily decreased and quality has increased (except for gamers, who pay more and more for better tech/games). I don't game so I benefit from the changes that take place.

When comparing the inconvenience factor of attempting/sending out for minor repairs (or major repairs), there's no contest, IMO, between owning a laptop versus owning a desktop.

If the portability factor is removed, I see no reason why anyone wants a laptop other than as a "toy."

With the number of computer forums that can help resolve desktop issues (but not laptop issues)...and the easy replacement of parts (when necessary), I cannot see it any other way.

But...I'm biased :blink:.

Louis

Edited by hamluis, 11 August 2010 - 03:45 PM.


#3 planetmolly

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 11:32 AM

Louis -

Thanks for your response. So true, I realized shortly after purchase that it had way more bells and whistles than I would ever use. I'm leaning in the direction you suggested - to put it towards a desktop. I do have another question though - what do I do with the Dell XPS1530? Couldn't someone use it for parts? It seems like there are still too many viable parts to just recycle it with Dell.

Thanks,
planetmolly

#4 Kalon Wiggins

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 01:19 PM

$500 should get you a custom tower at a local shop, considering that you already have your monitor, mouse, keyboard, operating system. Some other parts might even be able to be used like dvdburner, and hard drive. I definately wouldn't put $500 into a 2 year old dell when you could build a better replacement and have it be brand new brand name technology for the same price. go local and find someone you can trust to build you a nice system.

#5 planetmolly

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 03:24 PM

Kalon,

You really believe in going local and having them build? I've never done that...I don't know why I would trust buy.com over a local place. What are your reasons for going local?

Thanks,
planetmolly

#6 hamluis

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 03:45 PM

Well...I would keep it myself...I find that having more than one system...is very handy when it comes to troubleshooting issues with "the chosen one."

Historically...I've tended to give my "former systems" away to friends or strangers...there's always someone around who can use a system or one that is newer, more reliable than the one they currently use. It doesn't hurt me because I've had multiple systems on hand for the last 10 years or so and it benefits someone else.

Then there are agencies that you can donate it to and they can deal with the repairs and still benefit someone.

Louis

#7 Kalon Wiggins

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 11:25 AM

Well I don't know about buy.com but generally the differences between buying local vs bigbox are this:

-Locals tend to use brand name parts. Bigbox use generic parts that they have built for pennies for them in batches. Then they put their brand name on it.
-Drivers are way better for brand name parts since they are used in different systems with different operating systems.
-Brand name parts tend to be standardized sizes. Many times bigbox stores use special sized cases/powersupplies etc, so that you have to buy parts expensively from them if needed.
-Locals don't load up your system with software that you don't need, and that will slow your computer down. Bestbuy for example, has taken to upselling customers on their service to remove all this useless software from bigbox computers they sell for an extra cost. Interesting tactic....

You can get ok computers from bigbox stores/sites. Gamers will tell you that custom builds are always better, and gamers are the ones that demand the most performance, so that's a good indicator.

The drawback to buying local is that sometimes you get a little less software than you would like with it. If you already own your own software and monitor, then it's no big deal. Your motherboard is the most important thing in your computer, and when I look in a bigbox tower and don't see a brand I find it troubling.

Sure I'm biased, but those are the foundations of my bias. Just shop around, and don't assume that you have to go bigbox just because they are better. That's not neccesarily the case.

#8 planetmolly

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 04:37 PM

Thanks Kalon. I really appreciate your perspective. I'm going to look into going local and have them build.




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