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Time to buy a new LCD television


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#1 RknRusty

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 12:17 PM

It's finally time to move up in the world of TV watching.  I am going to get rid of the old 20" Panasonic that has served flawlessly for 23 years.  The kinescope is finally giving out and the picture quality is no longer acceptable.

I want to buy a 32" 720p TV.  What I've read and of course believe to be the truth :thumbsup: , is that 1080p is a waste of money since you only get 1080 input with BluRay DVD, and all networks broadcast 720, and are unlikely to change in the near future.  I also read that if you watch a 720p input on a 1080p TV, it has to convert the picture information up to 1080, and that in itself loses a small amount of quality.  How am I doing so far, is this all good information?

The next question is about features I see in ads.  Some TVs have more or less HDMI inputs.  What is that, and do I need more than one?  I can understand what a computer input is good for, but I see some have USB ports.  What would I use that for?  I have no plans to play games, just watch TV, DVDs, and possibly the computer if I ever upgrade my video card.

It looks like I can get a pretty good brand TV for $350.  Is there anything I should ask about while I'm buying it?  Is there anything it may not have in the box that will prevent me from hooking it up and watching without having to curse and make another trip to the store?




Thanks,

Rusty

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#2 JonM33

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 02:33 PM

I got a 42-inch LG 42LH30 (1080p) and the picture is beautiful. I got it for $599 at HHGregg. So I would recommend an LG. I like Samsung as well but they are generally more expensive.

Regarding 720p vs 1080p, I cannot tell a difference between the two. I generally watch 720p MKV HD movies through a Western Digital WDTV Gen2 media box. I can say that 720p movies don't look "worse" on a 1080p capable screen. It will output the resolution in 720p and not "upscale" it to 1080p.

Below is a NewEgg link for a 32-inch LG LCD HDTV (720p) for $399.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16889005118

HDMI is the new standard for video connections. For HD you can only use component or HDMI for 720p HD, it is not supported on RCA composite or S-Video. HDMI has an advantage of handling video and audio through one cable. So it really helps clean up the number of cables in your home theater.

Edited by JonM33, 01 August 2010 - 02:41 PM.


#3 RknRusty

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 03:20 PM

Is the connection from the output of the cable TV DVR to the input of the TV still standard coax?

#4 JonM33

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 03:44 PM

Is the connection from the output of the cable TV DVR to the input of the TV still standard coax?


The coaxial connects to the HD tuner in the TV. You don't want to connect to that. The DVR should have component or HDMI connections.

#5 RknRusty

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 03:59 PM

You're right, I just checked. The DVR has RCA outputs for video and audio. I believe that's what you mean by component. And so the HDMI is input for things like newer DVD players, games and other equipment. Okay, I'm good to go.
I think Target has a 32" Sony on sale for $349. Maybe I'll check it out if I can get my wife to take a look at it.

#6 JonM33

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 04:06 PM

You're right, I just checked. The DVR has RCA outputs for video and audio. I believe that's what you mean by component. And so the HDMI is input for things like newer DVD players, games and other equipment. Okay, I'm good to go.
I think Target has a 32" Sony on sale for $349. Maybe I'll check it out if I can get my wife to take a look at it.


No, RCA outputs are composite (red, white and yellow). Component is video only (blue, green, red).

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HDMI is most common on high definition players, such as BluRay. There are upscale DVD players that have HDMI as well. Game consoles will have HDMI too.

#7 RknRusty

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 06:03 PM

Oh, I see. I don't have BGR on mine, just composite. Now those terms, I do know. Used to fix TVs for walking around money back in college in the '70s. Television technology left me way behind. No tubes anymore. :thumbsup: And we used to say RGB.

#8 JonM33

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 06:40 PM

Oh, I see. I don't have BGR on mine, just composite. Now those terms, I do know. Used to fix TVs for walking around money back in college in the '70s. Television technology left me way behind. No tubes anymore. :flowers: And we used to say RGB.


Well, it is RGB I just listed it backwards. :thumbsup: Component can be used up to 1080p but for the sake of a clean look I'd just go with HDMI because it carries both audio and video. So it's one HDMI cable from the BluRay player to the receiver and one HDMI cable to the HDTV. That's a lot better than a spaghetti mess that cables used to be.

Don't get HDMI cable from local retail stores. You can buy it dirt cheap online. I got 4 HDMI cables from NewEgg for $9.98 each here.

#9 RknRusty

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 09:20 PM

Thanks Jon.
When I was joking about RGB, I was thinking about how when I went into the color copier servicing field, the Japanese at Canon called it BGR (before conversion to CMYK) and the other techs used to laugh at me for saying RGB.

#10 RknRusty

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 07:48 PM

I have found an LG 32LD350 progressive scan LCD TV at Sears on sale for $399(reg. $499). It also has a VGA input and 2 USB inputs. I want to make sure when I get it home, it will work with what I already have, so I have some questions.

1. Among other things, the specs say the video inputs are: component and HDMI. It does not say it has a composite video input. I thought all TVs had one, am I wrong to just assume it has one?

2. The back of my DVR, shown in the picture has a couple of sets of outputs. In the box labeled "Out 1," there is a yellow socket that is labeled TV and Video. That's composite video, is it not?

3. To the right of that is digital audio out. In the "Out 2" box are the audio outputs I currently run to my HTS(my old TV has no inputs for the HTS). Over to the right on the DVR is an S-video out. There is no HDMI output. If my DVR has no HDMI or component outputs, there is no way for me to get optimum picture is there?

EDIT: I should add, I do not care about super high quality from DVDs, games, etc. I just want the best cable TV picture I can get.

Thanks for your help,
Rusty

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Edited by RknRusty, 04 August 2010 - 08:25 PM.


#11 JonM33

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 10:05 PM

1. I searched and found that same HDTV on Amazon here. You have 2 HDMI, 1 component, 1 composite, 1 coaxial and 1 DE-15 VGA input.

2. Yes, "Out 1" is composite. You can also use the black digital coaxial audio instead of the red and yellow RCA for your "Out 1".

3. The best you can do is get standard definition from your DVR (plug the yellow from the DVR to your HDTV) and from the HTS (which I assume is a DVD player too) you can connect component (RGB) to your HDTV.

You seriously might want to look at high definition though. I promise you that it is worth it.

#12 RknRusty

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 10:18 PM

1. I searched and found that same HDTV on Amazon here. You have 2 HDMI, 1 component, 1 composite, 1 coaxial and 1 DE-15 VGA input.

2. Yes, "Out 1" is composite. You can also use the black digital coaxial audio instead of the red and yellow RCA for your "Out 1".

3. The best you can do is get standard definition from your DVR (plug the yellow from the DVR to your HDTV) and from the HTS (which I assume is a DVD player too) you can connect component (RGB) to your HDTV.

You seriously might want to look at high definition though. I promise you that it is worth it.

By getting HD, do you mean by upgrading my cable service to the HD tier?  In other words, just upgrading their DVR to an HD box won't make my signal HD, is that right?

Sorry, I'm way behind the times on all this.  I am catching up though.

#13 JonM33

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 10:32 PM

Yes, your cable provider should bump up your DVR to HD if you get the HD tier. Trust me on this! My father was SD for the longest time and had a 46-inch 720p LCD HDTV. I talked him into getting the HD tiers and now he won't watch anything if it's not in HD. He's 61 years old too. Sports are really what makes a difference between SD and HD - not sure if you are into sports though. He even got a BluRay player for Christmas and it will upscale his regular DVDs to 720p.

#14 RknRusty

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 10:59 PM

I'm in SEC country. My hometown South Carolina Gamecocks just won the CWS in Omaha and football is coming soon. I believe the Buckeyes have had a little trouble with them haven't they? :thumbsup:

I don't think I have the HD tier in my budget right now, but it should still be a lot better than the old 19" Panasonic.
Some shows are broadcast with the widescreen format even though they aren't HD aren't they?

Edited by RknRusty, 04 August 2010 - 11:11 PM.


#15 JohnWho

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 08:18 AM

RknRusty -

most, if not all, of the new HD TV's have both the older NTSC tuner and the newer digital ATSC tuner.

What this means is that using an antenna you'll be able to receive some of your local HD broadcasts.

Even better, what this may mean is that when you hook your new HD TV to your cable, you'll be able to allow it to "scan" for both analog and digital signals. On the one set I have that does not use a cable box I'm getting all of those channels that might be available OTA (over the air) as digital, HD channels. I'm getting this with the basic cable package without subscribing to the HD package. I do have a separate cable box/DVR on the other sets and have the HD package on them.

For many this means that with a new HD TV you will be able to view some digital HD sources over cable without paying anything additional and, of course, you still could use an antenna for digital HD viewing.

Enjoy.


I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!





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