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Is this motherboard dead?


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#1 crannerw31

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 12:16 AM

I'm checking out a computer for a friend. Fans come on but no beeps and no monitor says not connected.
ZT brand case MSI K9AGM2 motherboard with athlon64 x2 4000 . What i've tried using components from a similar machine.
1. switching out powersupply and powercord.
2. switching out Ram
3. switching out cpu
4. installing a pci-e video card, it was using the onboard video.

All attempts to bootup were attempted without IDE and Sata connectors connected to MB. I hate to have my friend (grandson in law's sister) buy a new MB but I can't think of anthing else to test. I don't see any leaking or bulging capacitors that I could replace. Does anyone know of a protocol for diagnosing death in a motherboard?
Thanks,
Bob Crane
family computer geek

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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 12:35 AM

I would say high probability, I have had a high failure rate with MSI boards, and if youve swapped out all the other components with known working and compatible ones, then I would say yes, the board is indeed dead.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 crannerw31

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 12:55 AM

thank you Patriot9.

#4 Chris_Pool

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 02:37 AM

Take the motherboard out of the case and put it on cardboard. Do the same with the PSU. Do not plug the power in yet.
Connect the 24/20 pin power for the motherboard, and the 4 pin alternate power for the motherboard. Disconnect everything besides one stick of ram, processor, and integrated video if possible.

Putting the mobo on cardboard ensures there is no metal creating a short and your PSU not turning on for self-preservation. Your psu runs a test before the computer starts to see if it's properly grounded; if there is metal touching the motherboard it won't start.

Plug the power into the PSU, and stick a screwdriver inbetween the two pins. When you press the power switch on your case, all it really does is complete the circuit between these two pins.

>The board starts up, fans whirl, but it turns off shortly, no video, speaker beeps, etc
The processor or probably RAM is bad. Switch with another if you can.

>The board starts up perfectly on the cardboard but didn't in the case
There was a short in the case somewhere. Check for loose pieces of metal, screws, etc.

>The board gives absolutely no response, no lights, no speaker beeps, no fans whirling.
It's completely dead.

#5 abauw

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 02:52 AM

honestly...
not completed dead...
there only need something to replace...

please could open the mainboard and bring it to a place that have good light..please take a look at your mainboard closer...look does your mainboard have burn sign on the capasiitor or something on it...

Edited by abauw, 31 July 2010 - 02:53 AM.

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#6 the_patriot11

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 04:13 AM

honestly...
not completed dead...
there only need something to replace...

please could open the mainboard and bring it to a place that have good light..please take a look at your mainboard closer...look does your mainboard have burn sign on the capasiitor or something on it...


That may be but repairing a motherboard really isnt feasible, especially an older one-you would have to have a working knowledge of a motherboards wiring layout, be good with a soder gun, and access to new capacitors, etc. And with motherboards once one part fries, the chances of another are higher, so after all the time and money invested in a older motherboard thats likely to fry again, really isn't worth the effort, its cheaper and easier just to replace the entire motherboard.

As far as Mr. Pools advice, it is a sound way of knowing for sure its not working, and definetly could not hurt to try it, however, if the computer was running before, and suddenly stopped for no apparent reason (you wernt messing around inside the case before it started acting funny or adding hardware etc) and with trying all the other working hardware the chances of it being the motherboard are pretty high.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#7 hamluis

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 09:38 AM

I don't see where you replaced the CMOS battery...having tried various other component switching/replacement, I would have done so.

Louis




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