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OKAY TO USE SWIFFER DRY CLOTHS TO CLEAN INSIDE COMPUTER?


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#1 ooweirdoo

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 09:18 PM

I'm guessing it uses some sort of static to suck up the dust so I'm wondering if it would cause problems to the hardware.

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#2 MadDawg

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 09:33 PM

I wouldn't risk using it on the inside of the computer, but using it on the case is fine. If you wanna clean the inside, use compressed air.

EDIT: fixed grammar error

Edited by MadDawg, 28 July 2010 - 11:45 PM.

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#3 ooweirdoo

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 10:14 PM

Yeah... the hardest part though is the cpu fan
There is always dust stuck on the bars which make it really hard to clean and reach

#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 10:22 PM

I wouldnt, instead go down to your local computer shop or electronics section of your local wal mart and pick up a can of compressed air, and use that to blow it out. Remember to use short bursts, hold that thing down to long and moisture will condense on your parts.

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#5 JonM33

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 08:09 AM

I wouldn't risk using it on the inside of the computer, but using it on the case is fine. If you wanna clean the inside, use compressed air.

EDIT: fixed grammar error


I agree. Only use compressed air. Do not use a vacuum cleaner either.

#6 MrBruce1959

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 09:39 AM

Here is a safe method to remove dust from your computer.

First and one of the most important is to ground yourself to the computer case before entering the computer case.

Do not have the computer running or even plugged in when cleaning it out!!!!

Second, purchase a brand new tooth brush with a narrow head. This will help remove embedded dust clogs from heat sinks and cooling fans. If the bristles are too long, use scissors to shorten the bristles to allow brush to fit through the cooling fans frame and fan blades.

Once you have removed all embedded dust, use compressed air, I caution you, do NOT allow the compressed air to make the cooling fans spin when blowing air at them, use the tooth brush handle to stop the fans from spinning!

Blow the rest of the dust out of the computers case, recheck everything, then reboot the computer. If it boots OK, close up the case.

Hope this helps.

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Edited by MrBruce1959, 29 July 2010 - 09:40 AM.

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#7 JonM33

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 12:13 PM

Once you have removed all embedded dust, use compressed air, I caution you, do NOT allow the compressed air to make the cooling fans spin when blowing air at them, use the tooth brush handle to stop the fans from spinning!


I have never heard of this. It would be fine to have them spin as long as it was the same direction as the air flow. I wouldn't ever blow the fan in reverse though.

#8 boopme

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 12:44 PM

You may also look at this guide. I agree with blocking the fans.
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/...8.html#cleaning
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#9 the_patriot11

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 12:51 PM

Blocking the fans is a good idea-moving them without the power is hard on the motors, in either direction.

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#10 JonM33

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 01:34 PM

Blocking the fans is a good idea-moving them without the power is hard on the motors, in either direction.


The only thing that power provides is electricity to the magnets, it doesn't have any effect on the rods, bearings and lubricating fluid.

#11 MrBruce1959

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 01:56 PM

Here is why I provided that caution.

I am explaining this in a non-technical way.

An electric motor can be driven by an electrical force, it can also work in reverse, such as how a generator creates electricity, if you placed a volt meter on the power wires of a cooling fan and forced the fan to spin, such as with compressed air or wind, you will experience a voltage reading on the wires. The fan generated electricity.

Since the fan has no control over how much output is generated, this voltage can reach a dangerous level and it can be sent back into the motherboard and its circuits, if a circuit reaches an unsafe level, a component in the circuit can be damaged and this voltage can also contain AC, the voltage coming from the PSU is filtered DC current, not AC.

Understand now why I gave that caution?


Bruce.

Edited by MrBruce1959, 29 July 2010 - 01:57 PM.

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#12 Eyesee

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 03:23 PM

I agree with Bruce and others not to let compressed air spin the fans when cleaning. That explanation makes perfect sense.

Years ago there used to be a cable tv channel called Tech TV. Leo LaPorte had a show on one time that discussed this and he advised not to do it.

How I clean the cpu fan is to take it off the heat sink and detach the power lead from the motherboard. Then I use a car detail brush on it. A tooth brush should work just as well
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#13 JonM33

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 03:35 PM

Here is why I provided that caution.

I am explaining this in a non-technical way.

An electric motor can be driven by an electrical force, it can also work in reverse, such as how a generator creates electricity, if you placed a volt meter on the power wires of a cooling fan and forced the fan to spin, such as with compressed air or wind, you will experience a voltage reading on the wires. The fan generated electricity.

Since the fan has no control over how much output is generated, this voltage can reach a dangerous level and it can be sent back into the motherboard and its circuits, if a circuit reaches an unsafe level, a component in the circuit can be damaged and this voltage can also contain AC, the voltage coming from the PSU is filtered DC current, not AC.

Understand now why I gave that caution?


Bruce.


Ah, I do see your theory regarding a mini-generator. I do believe the ground wires would prevent any problem like that though.

But, I suppose that it's better to play it safe though.

Edited by JonM33, 29 July 2010 - 05:43 PM.


#14 MrBruce1959

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 06:15 PM

I do believe the ground wires would prevent any problem like that though.


Regarding what you quoted above is not correct.

Grounding does not stop AC from happening.

It also does not prevent a damaging voltage from destroying low voltage IC circuits.

The voltage from a cooling fan is No.1 Not regulated. No.2 It is not filtered DC.

The PSU that sends power to the motherboard and cooling fans, has voltage regulators that regulate the current.

They also have filters which safely filter out the AC sine-wave. Most Integrated circuits can NOT handle direct AC current.

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#15 JonM33

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 06:23 PM

If you want to continue this further we can take it to PM. I already stated that I suppose it is better to play it safe.

I personally do not think that a small brushless fan motor can generate even negligible current. But that conversation would be best continued in a separate thread or PM. Proof is always better than theory. Thank you.




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