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Combofix Help


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#1 ironeagle76

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 11:06 AM

Greetings,

A relative of mine asked me to look at their computer. They have Norton 360 and it kept popping up with messages stating that the computer was being attacked. I ran a full system scan and the following threat appears twice: Backdoor.Tidserv!inf
I googled it and found your site (bleepingcomputer.com) and someone with a simillar issue (http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/topic306635.html) I followed the instructions through the part about combofix.
I ran Combofix last night and it found rootkit activity and needed to reboot the computer.
After rebooting, it continued scanning and found issues. This morning I thought I would run it again to check if anything had been missed, it found no issues but now when I try to open a program, an error message pops up stating:

"Illegal operation on a registry key that has been marked for deletion."

Can anyone help me with this?

O.S.: Windows Vista Business
A/V: Norton 360

Thanks in advance

Edited by Budapest, 28 July 2010 - 05:45 PM.
Moved from Virus, Trojan, Spyware, and Malware Removal Logs ~BP


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 08:17 AM

Please note the message text in blue at the top of this forum.

No one should be using ComboFix unless specifically instructed to do so by a Malware Removal Expert who can interpret the logs. It is a powerful tool intended by its creator to be "used under the guidance and supervision of an expert. Using this tool incorrectly could lead to disastrous problems with your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again.

With that said, ComboFix logs are not permitted outside the Virus, Trojan, Spyware, and Malware Removal Logs forum and then only when requested by a Malware Response Team member. Please read the pinned topic ComboFix usage, Questions, Help? - Look here.

:thumbsup: ComboFix logs, where should I post them?

...if you ran ComboFix on your own due to malware infection, please be aware that a ComboFix log is only one part of the disinfection process. Therefore we ask that you please read the pinned topic titled "Preparation Guide For Use Before Using Malware Removal Tools and Requesting Help". When you have done that, post the required logs to include your ComboFix log in that forum, NOT here, for assistance by the Malware Response Team Experts.


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#3 ironeagle76

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 11:44 AM

Greetings,

Since posting this yesterday, I am no longer getting the error message:

"Illegal operation on a registry key that has been marked for deletion."

All of the programs seem to work properly and I can get on the internet.
The only remaining problem now is when I run the Norton 360 comprehensive
scan, it finds two occurrences of Backdoor.Tidserv!inf and says they have to
be removed manually. I went to Symantec's website, and they have the
instructions for Windows XP, not Vista.

I also scanned the system with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and that program
didn't find any problems

#4 quietman7

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 12:22 PM

IMPORTANT NOTE: The identified infection is is related to a nasty variant of the TDSS/TDL3 rootkit. Rootkits, backdoor Trojans, Botnets, and IRCBots are very dangerous because they compromise system integrity by making changes that allow it to be used by the attacker for malicious purposes. Rootkits are used by backdoor Trojans to conceal its presence (hide from view) in order to prevent detection of an attacker's software and make removal more difficult. Many rootkits can hook into the Windows 32-bit kernel, and patch several APIs to hide new registry keys and files they install. They can disable your anti-virus and security tools to prevent detection and removal. Remote attackers use backdoors as a means of accessing and taking control of a computer that bepasses security mechanisms. This type of exploit allows them to steal sensitive information like passwords, personal and financial data which is send back to the hacker. To learn more about these types of infections, you can refer to:If your computer was used for online banking, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it, all passwords should be changed immediately to include those used for banking, email, eBay, paypal and online forums. You should consider them to be compromised. They should be changed using a clean computer and not the infected one. If not, an attacker may get the new passwords and transaction information. Banking and credit card institutions should be notified of the possible security breach. Because your computer was compromised please read:Although the infection has been identified and may be removed, your machine has likely been compromised and there is no way to be sure the computer can ever be trusted again. It is dangerous and incorrect to assume the computer is secure even if the malware appears to have been removed. In some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to your system that it cannot be completely cleaned or repaired so you can never be sure that you have completely removed a rootkit. The malware may leave so many remnants behind that security tools cannot find them. Tools that claim to be able to remove rootkits cannot guarantee that all traces of it will be removed. Many experts in the security community believe that once infected with this type of malware, the best course of action is to wipe the drive clean, reformat and reinstall the OS. Please read:

Whenever a system has been compromised by a backdoor payload, it is impossible to know if or how much the backdoor has been used to affect your system...There are only a few ways to return a compromised system to a confident security configuration. These include:
Reimaging the system
Restoring the entire system using a full system backup from before the backdoor infection
Reformatting and reinstalling the system

Backdoors and What They Mean to You

Should you decide not to follow that advice, we will do our best to help clean the computer of any infections but we cannot guarantee it to be trustworthy or that the removal will be successful. If you wish to proceed, please do the following.

Please download the TDSS Rootkit Removing Tool (TDSSKiller.zip) and save it to your Desktop. <-Important!!!
  • Extract (unzip) the file to your desktop and make sure TDSSKiller.exe (the contents of the zipped file) is on the Desktop itself, not within a folder on the Desktop. Vista/Windows 7 users refer to these instructions.
  • If you don't have an extracting program, you can download TDSSKiller.exe and use that instead.
  • Double-click on TDSSKiller.exe to run the tool for known TDSS variants.
    Vista/Windows 7 users right-click and select Run As Administrator.
  • When the program opens, click the Start Scan button.
  • Do not use the computer during the scan
  • If the scan completes with nothing found, click Close to exit.
  • If malicious objects are found, they will show in the Scan results - Select action for found objects and offer three options.
  • Ensure Cure is selected, then click Continue > Reboot now to finish the cleaning process.
    Note: If 'Suspicious' objects are detected, Skip will be the default selection.
  • A log file named TDSSKiller_version_date_time_log.txt (i.e. TDSSKiller.2.4.0.0_27.07.2010_09.o7.26_log.txt) will be created and saved to the root directory (usually Local Disk C:).
  • Copy and paste the contents of that file in your next reply.
-- If TDSSKiller does not run, try renaming it. To do this, right-click on TDSSKiller.exe, select Rename and give it a random name with the .com file extension (i.e. 123abc.com). If you do not see the file extension, please refer to How to change the file extension.
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#5 ironeagle76

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 02:08 PM

I thought that re-formatting might be the best option, because I've tried running TDSSKiller and Malwarebytes Anti-Malware, and neither of them even find the problem plus the fact that there isn't anything of importance on this system other than iTunes music and pictures.

I've worked on it for almost 2 days, so I think I'll do a reformat and be done with it

Thanks for the help

#6 quietman7

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 02:19 PM

I understand and that's the decision I would have made if this were my computer. Starting over by wiping your drive, reformatting, and performing a clean install of the OS removes everything and ensures no remnants of malicious files are left behind.

If you're not sure how to reformat or need help with reformatting, please review:These links include step-by-step instructions with screenshots:Vista users can refer to these instructions:Windows 7 users can refer to these instructions:Don't forget you will have to go to Microsoft Update and apply all Windows security patches after reformatting.

Note: If you're using an IBM, Sony, HP, Compaq, Toshiba, Gateway or Dell machine, you may not have an original XP CD Disk. By policy Microsoft no longer allows OEM manufactures to include the original Windows XP CD-ROM on computers sold with Windows preinstalled. Instead, most computers manufactured and sold by OEM vendors come with a vendor-specific Recovery Disk or Recovery Partition for performing a clean "factory restore" that will reformat your hard drive, remove all data and restore the computer to the state it was in when you first purchased it. Also be sure to read Technology Advisory Recovery Media. If the recovery partition has become infected, you will need to contact the manufacturer, explain what happened and ask them to send full recovery disks to use instead..

Reformatting a hard disk deletes all data. If you are reformatting or doing a factory restore due to malware infection, you can back up all your important documents, personal data files, photos to a CD or DVD drive, not a flash drive or external hard drive as they may become compromised in the process. The safest practice is not to backup any executable files (*.exe), screensavers (*.scr), autorun (.ini) or script files (.php, .asp, .htm, .html, .xml ) files because they may be infected by malware. Avoid backing up compressed files (.zip, .cab, .rar) that have executables inside them as some types of malware can penetrate compressed files and infect the .exe files within them. Other types of malware may even disguise itself by hiding a file extension or adding to the existing extension as shown here (click Figure 1 to enlarge) so be sure you look closely at the full file name. If you cannot see the file extension, you may need to reconfigure Windows to show file name extensions. Then make sure you scan the backed up data with your anti-virus prior to to copying it back to your hard drive.

If your CD/DVD drive is unusable, another word of caution if you are considering backing up to an external usb hard drive as your only alternative. External drives are more susceptible to infection and can become compromised in the process of backing up data. I'm not saying you should not try using such devices but I want to make you aware of all your options and associated risks so you can make an informed decision if its worth that risk.Again, do not back up any files with the following file extensions: exe, .scr, .ini, .htm, .html, .php, .asp, .xml, .zip, .rar, .cab as they may be infected.

If you need additional assistance with reformatting or partitioning, you can start a new topic in the appropriate Windows Operating System Subforum.
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