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I hear audio that says "Congratulations, you won"


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#1 tlovitz

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 08:03 PM

For the past few days, my computer has been saying "Congratulations, you won" at random intervals, and, less frequently, I will hear instrumental music that reminds me of the soundtrack to movie previews. I believe the computer became infected through Google Chrome. When it initially happened, I had several iexplore.exe processes running, even though Internet Explorer had not been running. Subsequently, I have not seen any errant iexplore.exe processes. I downloaded and installed Spybot S&D, ran a full scan and it came back with nothing. I also downloaded and ran Malware Byte's Anti-Malware and did a full scan. It found a couple cookies, which I deleted. While the scan was running, McAfee Anti-Virus found a virus file that it cleaned by deletion.

I am running Windows Vista Service Pack 2. I appreciate any help that anyone can provide with cleaning my computer.

Thank you very much.

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 08:29 PM

It's possible that you have an infected Master Boot Record (MBR) so lets check it to be sure.

Please download MBRCheck.exe by a_d_13 from one of the links provided below and save it to your desktop.Link 1
Link 2
Link 3
  • Double-click on MBRCheck.exe to run it. Vista/Windows 7 users right-click and select Run As Administrator).
  • It will open a black window...please do not fix anything (if it gives you an option).
  • When complete, you should see Done! Press ENTER to exit.... Press Enter on the keyboard.
  • A log named MBRCheck_date_time.txt (i.e. MBRCheck_07.21.10_10.22.51.txt) will appear on the desktop.
  • Please copy and paste the contents of that log in your next reply.

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#3 tlovitz

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 09:15 PM

Here is the log generated by MBRChecker:


MBRCheck, version 1.1.1

© 2010, AD



\\.\C: --> \\.\PhysicalDrive0

\\.\D: --> \\.\PhysicalDrive0



Size Device Name MBR Status

--------------------------------------------

232 GB \\.\PhysicalDrive0 Unknown MBR code





Found non-standard or infected MBR.

Enter 'Y' and hit ENTER for more options, or 'N' to exit:



Done! Press ENTER to exit...

I do appreciate you attempting to help me with this problem. I await further advice. Thank you.

#4 quietman7

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 11:21 PM

Rerun MBRCheck.exe again by double-clicking on it. Vista/Windows 7 users right-click and select Run As Administrator).
  • Wait until you see the following line: Enter 'Y' and hit ENTER for more options, or 'N' to exit:
  • Enter 'Y' and then press Enter.
  • When asked: 'Enter your choice:', select option 2 (Restore the MBR of a physical disk with a standard boot code) and press the Enter key.
  • Now the program will ask: 'Enter the physical disk number to fix (0-99, -1 to cancel)'
  • Enter 0 and press the Enter key.
  • The program will show Available MBR codes followed by a list of operating systems as shown below.

    Available MBR codes:
    [ 0] Default (Windows XP)
    [ 1] Windows XP
    [ 2] Windows Server 2003
    [ 3] Windows Vista
    [ 4] Windows 2008
    [ 5] Windows 7
    [-1] Cancel
    Please select the MBR code to write to this drive:

  • Please select your version of Windows from the list and enter the corresponding number (For example, type 0 or 1 for XP, type 3 for Vista, etc) and then press Enter.
  • When prompted for confirmation: 'Do you want to fix the MBR code?'. Type the full word Yes (not Y or the fix will not work) and press Enter.
  • Left-click on the title bar (where program name and path is written).
  • From the menu chose Edit -> Select All.
  • Press the Enter key on your keyboard to copy selected text.
  • Open Notepad, paste that text into it and save to your desktop as MBRCheck.txt.
  • When complete, you should see Done! Press ENTER to exit.... Press Enter on the keyboard.
  • Reboot your computer to complete the fix and copy/paste MBRCheck.txt in your next reply.
  • If your computer does not restart on its own, please restart it manually.
Important Note: While fixing the Master Boot Record (MBR) is generally safe, there is a small risk of damaging the operating system so that it will not boot up or the partitions may become corrupted. I recommend you have your Windows CD available which will allow recovering the boot code via the Windows Recovery Console in case of any problems or install the XP Recovery Console before proceeding with the above fix. Then if any problems occur, the links below explain how to use and repair the MBR:
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#5 tlovitz

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 02:18 PM

I'm no longer hearing any of that audio. Sorry it took so long to get back to you. After running the MBRChecker and telling it to fix the computer, it no longer wanted to boot last night. And it took me a few hours this morning to locate my Vista disk and get it to fix the MBR.

At this point in time, do you suspect the computer is clean of the problem, or do you think there are other steps I need to take to ensure the computer is clean? If you think I'm done, I want to thank you very much for all of your help, it is greatly appreciated.

#6 quietman7

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 02:33 PM

We need to confirm that the MBR was restored successfully.

Rerun MBRCheck.exe once more (do not run any options).
  • When complete, you should see Done! Press ENTER to exit.... Press Enter on the keyboard.
  • A new log named MBRCheck_date_time.txt will appear on the desktop.
  • Do not get this log confused with any previous logs (check the date and time if unsure).
  • Copy and paste the contents of that log in your next reply.

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#7 tlovitz

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 04:25 PM

MBRChecker log:


MBRCheck, version 1.1.1

© 2010, AD



\\.\C: --> \\.\PhysicalDrive0

\\.\D: --> \\.\PhysicalDrive0



Size Device Name MBR Status

--------------------------------------------

232 GB \\.\PhysicalDrive0 Windows Vista MBR code detected





Done! Press ENTER to exit...

#8 quietman7

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 04:46 PM

Looks good.

Are there any more signs of infection, unwanted pop-ups or browser redirects?
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#9 tlovitz

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 04:48 PM

Not so far. Firefox and Google Chrome seem to be fine. I haven't tested IE because I never use it, but I'll bring it up and see if it does anything weird. If it does, I'll post back here.

#10 quietman7

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 05:01 PM

Ok.

If there are no more problems or signs of infection, you should Create a New Restore Point to prevent possible reinfection from an old one. Some of the malware you picked up could have been backed up, renamed and saved in System Restore. Since this is a protected directory your tools cannot access to delete these files, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. Setting a new restore point AFTER cleaning your system will help prevent this and enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state.

The easiest and safest way to do this is:
  • Go to Posted Image > Programs > Accessories > System Tools and click "System Restore".
  • Choose the radio button marked "Create a Restore Point" on the first screen then click "Next". Give the R.P. a name, then click "Create". The new point will be stamped with the current date and time. Keep a log of this so you can find it easily should you need to use System Restore.
  • Then use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recently created Restore Point.
  • Go to Posted Image > Run... and type: Cleanmgr
  • Click "Ok". Disk Cleanup will scan your files for several minutes, then open.
  • Click the "More Options" tab, then click the "Clean up" button under System Restore.
  • Click Ok. You will be prompted with "Are you sure you want to delete all but the most recent restore point?"
  • Click Yes, then click Ok.
  • Click Yes again when prompted with "Are you sure you want to perform these actions?"
  • Disk Cleanup will remove the files and close automatically.
Vista and Windows 7 users can refer to these links: Create a New Restore Point in Vista or Windows 7 and Disk Cleanup in Vista.
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#11 tlovitz

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 10:36 PM

I've created a new restore point and removed any old ones. Thanks for all the help.

#12 quietman7

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 07:33 AM

You're welcome.

:thumbsup: Tips to protect yourself against malware and reduce the potential for re-infection:

Keep Windows and Internet Explorer current with all critical updates from Microsoft which will patch many of the security holes through which attackers can gain access to your computer. If you're not sure how to do this, see Microsoft Update helps keep your computer current.

Avoid gaming sites, porn sites, pirated software, cracking tools, keygens, and peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing programs (i.e. Limewire, eMule, uTorrent). They are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. Malicious worms, backdoor Trojans IRCBots, and rootkits spread across P2P file sharing networks, gaming, porn and underground sites. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install viruses, Trojans, and spyware. Ads are a target for hackers because they offer a stealthy way to distribute malware to a wide range of Internet users. Porn sites can lead to the Trojan.Mebroot MBR rootkit and other dangerous malware. The best way to reduce the risk of infection is to avoid these types of web sites and not use any P2P applications.Beware of Rogue Security software as they are one of the most common sources of malware infection. They infect machines by using social engineering and scams to trick a user into spending money to buy a an application which claims to remove malware. For more specific information on how these types of rogue programs and infections install themselves, read:Keeping Autorun enabled on USB (pen, thumb, jump) and other removable drives has become a significant security risk as they are one of the most common infection vectors for malware which can transfer the infection to your computer. To learn more about this risk, please read:Many security experts recommend you disable Autorun asap as a method of prevention. Microsoft recommends doing the same.

...Disabling Autorun functionality can help protect customers from attack vectors that involve the execution of arbitrary code by Autorun when inserting a CD-ROM device, USB device, network shares, or other media containing a file system with an Autorun.inf file...

Microsoft Security Advisory (967940): Update for Windows Autorun
How to Maximize the Malware Protection of Your Removable Drives

Other security reading resources:Browser Security resources:Finally, if you need to replace your anti-virus, firewall or need a reliable anti-malware scanner please refer to:
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