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DVD types?


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#1 MickinPlymouthUK

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 07:56 PM

Hi, I'm relatively new to DVD burning and have been meaning to ask about DVD types for some time but chickened out til now in case I appeared stupid (sniffle)
Believe me, I've tried to look it up on the net but am still not sure, then when I asked at the local computer shop I was left punch drunk by a barrage of unfathomable techy-talk..

Firstly, There are 4 types, right? namely-
DVD-R
DVD-RW
DVD+R
DVD+RW

Secondly what does the '-' and '+' signify?

Third,why do people use the R (write-once) types?
I mean, why not use the RW (re-writeable) ones all the time so they can write new data over them in the future?

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#2 ReviverSoft

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 08:04 PM

Posted Image
- Osta.org

The distinctions in the types are actually based on how the data is written to and read from the disk

Posted Image
- Afterdawn.com

Hope that helps. :thumbsup:

Edited by ReviverSoft, 27 July 2010 - 08:05 PM.

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#3 Capn Easy

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 08:15 PM

Gosh! Somebody always has to take all of the mystery out of everything! :flowers: :trumpet: :thumbsup:

For a little more info on the "minus" vs. "plus" approach, check the Competing Formats section of the article in Wiki.




As far as the "R" versus "RW" use, I use the RW disks for information that I don't plan to store permanently. It's cheaper and more convenient to use an RW disc and erase it when I'm done.

On the other hand, if I do want to keep something permanently, I burn it to a -R or +R disc. The most obvious advantage is that I won't accidentally erase something I want to keep.

Edited by Capn Easy, 27 July 2010 - 08:21 PM.


#4 DaChew

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 08:37 PM

A friend of mine from downunder came up with his "golden rules"

http://forum.digital-digest.com/showthread.php?t=49635

I don't hardly ever use RW's, but then I have been accused of having ridiculous standards.
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#5 Platypus

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 08:42 PM

The long-term reliability of re-writables is not good (except DVD-RAM which has about 100x the re-write specification of RW and a design life of 30 years).

RW is also the hardest to read (lowest reflectivity) and write (typically 4 - 11 mW laser power for R and 8 - 14mW for RW), plus formatting, which leads to the shortest laser life with regular use of RW discs. This showed up clearly during the brief heyday of DVD-RW video recorders. It was not unusual for heavy users (ie shift workers recording a full DVD-RW daily) to need to replace the laser every 6 months or so. This spurred the adoption of HDD recorders/PVRs.

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#6 ReviverSoft

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 08:42 PM

As far as the "R" versus "RW" use, I use the RW disks for information that I don't plan to store permanently. It's cheaper and more convenient to use an RW disc and erase it when I'm done.
Simply put:

DVD-R : DVD Recordable (only write)
DVD-RW : DVD Rewritable (erase contents, rewrite)

From what I have seen so far, DVD-Rs are the most common type.

Edit:
As Platypus pointed out, DVD-RWs like CD-RWs have very slow Read/Write speeds comparatively.

:thumbsup:

Edited by ReviverSoft, 27 July 2010 - 08:44 PM.

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#7 MickinPlymouthUK

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 06:04 PM

Okay guys I'm following your posts and links like a hawk, can you just clarify the 'minus' v 'plus' issue a bit more?-
They're presumably both exactly the same capacity, but I gather the 'plusses' are slightly more reliable than the older 'minuses', is that right?
So why doesn't everybody use 'plusses' rather than the old hat 'minuses'?
They cost the same don't they?

#8 Platypus

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:02 PM

I don't know if there's any (inherent) difference in the reliability of the designs.

The minus design is slightly older, and more closely resembles a standard DVD. That suggests it may be more likely to
play successfully as a DVD in any kind of DVD player, and you often see them recommended as an automatic choice for video applications because of this.

The more flexible design of the plus can offer better performance with data applications - greater transfer rate in particular.

Edited by Platypus, 28 July 2010 - 07:03 PM.

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#9 ReviverSoft

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 07:51 PM

can you just clarify the 'minus' v 'plus' issue a bit more?
This should clarify things, once and for all. :thumbsup:
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#10 DaChew

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 09:02 PM

Here's a few more links

http://forum.imgburn.com/index.php?showforum=15

http://www.digitalfaq.com/guides/media/index.htm

http://www.svp.co.uk/technology/consumables/blank-dvdr/1/

http://www.videohelp.com/dvdmedia

http://forum.digital-digest.com/showthread.php?t=66993
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#11 MickinPlymouthUK

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 06:17 PM

I'm getting there... let me run this past y'all-
Suppose I burn some stuff to an 'R' DVD and then remove it from the drive, switch off my PC and go have a cup of tea, but later realise I forgot to burn a couple more items onto it.
Even if there's ample unused space still on the disk, I can never burn anything else to it, because 'R's' only allow one burn session, after which you can't burn anything else onto it later, is that right?

#12 ReviverSoft

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 08:15 PM

What you are referring to, is called Multisession.

This should help:

The DVD-R format is designed for single session only. This is because it is meant to be used in as many as possible DVD players. A DVD-R is preformatted as one volume. As a rule of thumb you can say: DVR-R is for video DVD's and single session storage use and can be played in most machines, while DVD+R is for data storage and has a much more limited range of use due to its multi-session format (many video players will not accept them). There is no such thing as a "superior" format here. It fully depends on the intended use.


CD-R/RWs are a lot easier to work with, as far as multisession goes.
However, the problem with some CD/DVD players 'not being able to recognize the recent sessions' still exists.

Edited by ReviverSoft, 29 July 2010 - 08:22 PM.

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#13 JonM33

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Posted 31 July 2010 - 09:31 PM

Hi, I'm relatively new to DVD burning and have been meaning to ask about DVD types for some time but chickened out til now in case I appeared stupid (sniffle)
Believe me, I've tried to look it up on the net but am still not sure, then when I asked at the local computer shop I was left punch drunk by a barrage of unfathomable techy-talk..

Firstly, There are 4 types, right? namely-
DVD-R
DVD-RW
DVD+R
DVD+RW

Secondly what does the '-' and '+' signify?

Third,why do people use the R (write-once) types?
I mean, why not use the RW (re-writeable) ones all the time so they can write new data over them in the future?


Just go with Verbatim DVD+R and you will be happy. They are by far the best media on the market. I only use DVD+R and not DVD-R.




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