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just curious, Windows Server 2008 Standard edition 32 bit?


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#1 chromebuster

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 12:21 PM

Hi,
not that I have Windows Server or anything, but I'm just curious, is there a 32 bit version? Books tell me that there is, but Microsoft Dreamspark says otherwise. all server geeks around here, what is the real story?

Many thanks,
Chromebuster

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#2 Baltboy

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 08:41 AM

Server 2008 comes in 32 bit and 64 bit versions. Itanium is no longer supported.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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#3 chromebuster

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 01:36 PM

Oh okay cool. Then why does it say on dreamspark that you must have a 64 bit processor? I find that a little confusing. and another thing, what programs does the standard version of server 2008 32 bit support? You see, I'm a very curious enthusiast, and I am hoping to one day run my own server at home that hosts my web site and email/file server. like for example, I've heard that Server 2008 32 bit web edition will support IIS yet it will not support something like SQL server (not that I use that, but I use MySQL for windows and love it). What is the real story on that as well? any input would be great.

Thanks,
Chromebuster

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#4 Baltboy

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 09:55 PM

The only real difference between the 32 and 64 bit versions of server 2008 (in general) is the use of the 64 bit programming, drivers, ect. All of the various servers are available on both iterations (i.e. sql, exchange, dns, dhcp, iis, so on and so forth).

Here is a link to Microsoft about the memory , cpu, ect. for the different versions of 2008

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008...quirements.aspx


Oh and I was wrong Itanium is still supported in server 2008. The report was that they are dropping support for Itanium in all future products. :thumbsup:
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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#5 chromebuster

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Posted 25 July 2010 - 12:33 PM

Cool. The only problem is for those who want to run their own servers, it's too bad that there is no version of Antivirus software that runs on the server versions except the corporate version. Isn't that true too? You see, since my computer is four years old, despite that, it can handle windows 7 without issues, so obviously it can handle Server 2008 standard, right? I mean seriously, how on earth do you judge those things comfortably without using up too many windows Authentications in the process?

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#6 Baltboy

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Posted 25 July 2010 - 09:22 PM

Unfortunately yes most of the antivirus solutions most of us have come to know will not work with a server operating system.

I'm sure your computer could run server 2008 relatively easily in a home environment. Although I'm not really sure why you would want to unless you are studying for an exam. Servers are not intended to be used as everyday computers and really they are a PIA to use for that purpose. Server software and hardware combinations are based not on only the OS requirements. That is the smallest portion of the load on a true server. Most of the load placed on a server is from having multiple clients access the server for authentication, data retrevial, e-mail, ect. Most of the servers today that are in use are prebuilt and tested to handle x number of clients easily and microsoft has guidelines on how much more you will need hardware wise for a certain client base over the basic system requirements.

As far as the whole authentication thing goes remember that if you are using a retail version of windows of any kind as long as you are not changing the hardware you can re-install countless times withot having to authenticate again.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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#7 chromebuster

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Posted 25 July 2010 - 10:34 PM

Oh. Thanks so much for the broad range of info. But one question for you. You know how I have my web site up as you can see in my signature, right? I want to one day host the site myself when I get better at learning how ASP.net works. Would I need Server 2008 for that, or can the version of IIS that is installed with Windows 7 work too despite that stupid 10 concurrent connection limitation imposed on you running a site off of win7 or another OS? It's not really a high traffic sight to be honest. And why do you say that running server 2008 on your home computer is a pain in the butt? I've heard that it's just like Win 7 or Win Vista except with a few more features and a little more security. one of my contacts did it for a while, and he said that it didn't really feel much different. What's your take? And if I were per se to put Server 2008 on my computer at home, it would be no longer used as an everyday computer. But these days, it seems that lots of server software, like Blackmoon FTP server, Abyss web server, MySQL Server, or HMailServer, don't even need a server OS to run on. I mean, the IIS thingo wouldn't even apply to me if only I could get a single ASP.net Application running on Abyss, but that doesn't seem to be my luck of success at the moment, so, right about now, I'm stuck with IIS.

Thanks again,
Chromebuster

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#8 Baltboy

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 08:38 PM

The reason I say it is a pain IMO is because of the extra security stuff. I found IE to be a pain to use and changing the settings around helped some but for me the was still to many warnings and hold ups when using IE. Also even though there is "extra security" in the server there is extra because servers are inhertently less secure than workstations due to the number of services and the related required ports to use them. Microsoft deliberately trys to make doing tasks that are easy on a workstation, such as browsing the internet, more difficult because that is where most of the user influenced errors occur that allow system breaches.

I am not to familiar with IIS other than setting it up and maintaining it on server 2000/2003 and I know nothing about ASP.net support in win7 or the IIS version included. Past history dictates that the version of IIS (what used to called personal web server in older versions) included in win 7 is a limited and pared down version of the true IIS included with server. What that means however I have no idea right now since win7 is still a few back on the list of new things I am trying to learn. I have run win7 some but still prefer XP, call me resistant to change, so the learning curve is a little slow right now.

I also can comment on most of the other web servers out there since I have decided to stick mostly to Microsoft stuff until I catch up again. The only thing I can truly say is that to my knowledge Apache is the most heavily used Linux variant out there.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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#9 chromebuster

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 10:23 PM

Interesting. what I've figured out about Windows 7 and IIS is that it depends on which version you have. For example, I run Windows 7 Ultimate on my desktop, and Windows 7 Pro here on my laptop, so the only issue for me is the number of concurrent connections to the web server. All of the features are available in the higher versions of Windows 7 for IIS except the connection thing. But one thing that makes Microsoft a bit on the moronic side is the fact that even for workstation OS', they don't make that number a fixed one. in other words, the user could edit that box and the config would stick! You see what I'm saying?? It makes no sense that Microsoft doesn't enforce it's own rules. But on the side of Servers, what I really want to do one of these days is to make a server out of my desktop to enforce rules for shares on my local LAN for my parent's business, and then also run my own site with a secure FTP on top of that. And when it comes to Apache, if I were to use that server software, I'd use the Windows version since Linux has too much of a personal connection to it that i really want nothing more to do with. But that's a story for another day.

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#10 Baltboy

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 03:23 PM

Here is microsoft's article of IIS support for server and win7
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc753473.aspx

Amazingly it seems the win7 version is fully intact in professional and ultimate. So it seems the only real bottleneck is the number of concurent connections. I think with IIS connections the reason they are suggesting ten connections is because the OS and most of the time the hardware on a workstation class computer is less capable of running these as well. Having more than ten connections could cause the computer to lag badly, lock up, or be unusable for your other everyday chores.

For what you want to do server software is the way to go. I would look into server 2003 as well since it is still a viable OS and cheaper to boot.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

#11 chromebuster

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 06:47 PM

Thanks for all of the info. I'm still going to think about Abyss though too. I think to get that working, I've got to just make some changes in the web.config file, and then we'll be all set. I am definitely thinking about putting a server OS on my desktop though. Not anytime soon unfortunately, but at least it's free for me for the next four years at least. With dreamspark and all that. It's great.

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#12 chromebuster

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 11:47 AM

I just thought of something. You know how dreamspark is about learning to create your dreams and to have your dreams come true? And Microsoft wants you to use the software offered by the program to explore technology, development, mathematics, or design? Server 2008 falls into this. If I were to explore it and to practice using it's features on my local network as well as the web features seeing that my site is not a very high traffic site, how would the purchase of CAL factor into this? If they want you to explore this type of thing, don't they expect you to actually use it? For example, with a dreamspark obtained version of server 2008, if I set up a network share for my family, would I get in trouble? I can't find anything that relates to CAL when using Dreamspark software. any input would be wonderful.

Thanks
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#13 Baltboy

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 07:20 PM

I don't know anything about dreamspark but what I do know is this. If you are using server and multiple clients are accessing it in any way they all need CAL's. CAL's are driven by the number or usere/clients that are accessing the server for any reason. Most, but not all, server software comes with five CAL's included.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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#14 chromebuster

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 07:30 PM

Thanks. I'll have to ask Microsoft about that. Do you know if the 5 CAL default include goes for Server 2008?b

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