Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Painted Wallpaper


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 dekka5

dekka5

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 22 July 2010 - 07:09 AM

Have recently moved into a new home which has painted wallpaper - yuk
This could have been done to hide unsightly walls.
Anyway it sort of fits with the rest of the house which from a distance looks smart, but
on closer inspection lots of bodging and bad diy shows up!

My question is this, should I continue painting over the existing wallpaper or should I remove
it and face a bigger job of re-plastering the walls to smooth them back up?

Has anyone had to go through this?

thanks in advance for any thoughts.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Pandy

Pandy

    Bleepin' Panda


  • Members
  • 9,562 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:12:10 PM

Posted 22 July 2010 - 04:48 PM

If it was me, I would take off the old wallpaper that was painted on a have the walls fixed and then paint them.. but that is a personal preference, as I dislike wallpaper for the most part. Painting is so much neater I think. It depends on what you want to take the time and expense to do :thumbsup:

Do not anticipate trouble, or worry about what may never happen. Keep in the sunlight.

Hide not your talents. They for use were made. What's a sundial in the shade?

~ Benjamin Franklin

I am a Bleeping Computer fan! Are you?

Facebook

Follow us on Twitter


#3 Orange Blossom

Orange Blossom

    OBleepin Investigator


  • Moderator
  • 37,110 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Bloomington, IN
  • Local time:12:10 PM

Posted 27 July 2010 - 03:35 PM

I think for a better looking job, it would be much better to remove the old wall paper and fix up the walls.

Any paint job looks better when the walls have been smoothed - nail holes, dents, cracks etc. Since you should really do that anyway, might as well remove the wall paper as well.

Orange Blossom :thumbsup:
Help us help you. If HelpBot replies, you MUST follow step 1 in its reply so we know you need help.

Orange Blossom

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

SpywareBlaster, WinPatrol Plus, ESET Internet Security, NoScript Firefox ext.


animinionsmalltext.gif

#4 Broni

Broni

    The Coolest BC Computer


  • BC Advisor
  • 42,770 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Daly City, CA
  • Local time:09:10 AM

Posted 27 July 2010 - 09:09 PM

It all depends how good handyperson you're.
Removing layered wallpaper is a big pain and you never know, what you'll find underneath.
If it's a plaster, meaning an old house, you'll face a lot of patching.
If it's sheetrock and if it wasn't primed underneath 1st layer of a wallpaper, removing procedure will tear off a lot of sheetrock paper.

You may actually do better to cut out any bubbles, prime all walls with oil based primer and re-plaster it over existing surface. If you're OK with a textured walls, you can spray texture them, which will cover a lot of faults.

My Website

My help doesn't cost a penny, but if you'd like to consider a donation, click DONATE

 


#5 dekka5

dekka5
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 06 August 2010 - 09:16 AM

Thanks for all your comments (sorry been away for a few days).
The perfectionist in me wants to remove the paper and do a proper job, but as was mentioned, who knows what I may find underneath and I may end up with more of a mess if it pulls the plaster off...
Im tempted to leave it as it is and just add to the layers of paint...if it was my dream home I'd do it properly, but I think I'll leave the hard work to someone else. :thumbsup:

#6 Jacee

Jacee

    Bleeping around


  • Malware Response Team
  • 3,716 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:10:10 AM

Posted 08 August 2010 - 11:11 AM

One thing you can think about, is to mix up some drywall mud ... make it easy enough to apply with a paint brush over the old paint. With the brush, 'paint' it on the wall using curved strokes, over-lapping each other to give a nice textured look. Paint it when dry.

This textured application conceals a lot of holes, dents and cracks too. Almost looks like stucco :thumbsup:

MS_MVP.gif
MS MVP Windows-Security 2006-2016
Member of UNITE, the Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

Admin PC Pitstop


#7 Jacee

Jacee

    Bleeping around


  • Malware Response Team
  • 3,716 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:10:10 AM

Posted 08 August 2010 - 11:30 AM

Hopefully you can see an example in this picture

Posted Image

MS_MVP.gif
MS MVP Windows-Security 2006-2016
Member of UNITE, the Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

Admin PC Pitstop


#8 Martel

Martel

    Drfixup Human Internet Solutions


  • Members
  • 1,469 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina U.S.A.
  • Local time:12:10 PM

Posted 15 August 2010 - 10:26 AM

Removing layered wallpaper is a big pain and you never know, what you'll find underneath.

You may actually do better to cut out any bubbles, prime all walls with oil based primer and re-plaster it over existing surface. If you're OK with a textured walls, you can spray texture them, which will cover a lot of faults.



One thing you can think about, is to mix up some drywall mud ... make it easy enough to apply with a paint brush over the old paint. With the brush, 'paint' it on the wall using curved strokes, over-lapping each other to give a nice textured look. Paint it when dry.


Stripping wallpaper can be a monster. If it pulls right off you are lucky but will still need to skim the walls.
Being a drywall specialist I would recommend combing both of the two techniques above.

Both methods are excellent advice... and I can tell Broni and Jacee have already been down this road.

#9 Broni

Broni

    The Coolest BC Computer


  • BC Advisor
  • 42,770 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Daly City, CA
  • Local time:09:10 AM

Posted 15 August 2010 - 11:25 AM

and I can tell Broni and Jacee have already been down this road

Hahaha....

My Website

My help doesn't cost a penny, but if you'd like to consider a donation, click DONATE

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users