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Please help: upgrade, oc, or build a new one?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Leo Dj

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 08:08 AM

Hi everyone,
I just joined this forum. :thumbsup:

This is my current computer config which I built in mid 2007:
- Thermaltake Soprano DX VE7000BNS Black 0.8mm SECC Chassis/ Aluminum Front Bezel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
- Thermaltake toughpower W0103RU 600W
- Intel Core 2 Duo E6750 2.66GHz LGA 775 65W
- ASUS P5K DELUXE/WIFI-AP LGA 775 Intel P35 ATX
- 2 Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD2500KS 250GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s
- 1 Western Digital Caviar Black WD1001FALS 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s
- 2 Patriot Extreme Performance 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin
DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel (4 Gig Ram total)
- XFX PVT84JUDD3 GeForce 8600GT 256MB 128-bit GDDR3 PCI Express x16 SLI Supported Video Card
- 2 LITE-ON 20X DVD Burner LightScribe SATA LH-20A1L-06
- Win XP SP3

I want to upgrade my software Adobe Lightroom 1.4 to version 3, but my computer would be too slow for the latest version.

Would upgrading the CPU to Quads and the RAM to 1066MHz be the best bang for the buck or should I just build a new one with perhaps i5?
Maybe if I get a new motherboard I can reuse some of the peripherals here like the case, power supply, DVD drives, harddisks, and the video card?

Too bad Newegg doesn't have XP pro anymore. I like XP and some device that I use like my monitor calibrator is compatible with XP only (I think). If I build a new one, I will have to buy a new OS.
I may have to check other sites if they still sell XP Pro.

Here is the spec of the MoBo:
Supported CPU
CPU Socket Type LGA 775
CPU Type Core 2 Quad / Core 2 Extreme / Core 2 Duo
FSB 1333/1066MHz
Memory
Number of Memory Slots 4×240pin
Memory Standard DDR2 1066 / 800 / 667 MHz
The chipset officially supports the memory frequency up to DDR2 800MHz. Tuned by ASUS Super Memspeed Technology, this motherboard natively supports up to DDR2 1066MHz
Maximum Memory Supported 8GB
Channel Supported Dual Channel

Complete Mobo Spec
----

Will I get significant speed increase by changing the CPU and RAM on my current MoBo?
The FSB says 1333/1066MHz. Does that mean I can use a 1333MHz RAM?

Some recommend that I could also overclock, but I'm not brave enough to do this. I read few articles. Some warn that I may get blue screen if the settings are incorrect.

Thank you in advance,
Leo

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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 09:25 AM

Some recommend that I could also overclock, but I'm not brave enough to do this. I read few articles. Some warn that I may get blue screen if the settings are incorrect.


That's part of overclocking. I have yet to run across a 6750 that wouldn't go to at least 3.3ghz with little or no voltage bump. That makes a difference. As long as you don't get crazy with voltage, the stock cooler is adequate.

I really wouldn't put more cash into a Socket 775 at this point. The CPUs are legacy products and Intel is still overpricing them. DDR2 memory cannot be carried over into future builds. You will be throwing cash at what is essentially a dead end. Figure in also you will have to get a 64bit OS to deal with 4gigs of memory.

Save the cash and build either a new Quad Phenom AMD or Intel 1156.

If I were itching to burn cash in the short term to improve performance, I might consider an SSD to put my working files on to help disk access issues when working on big files.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

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#3 Leo Dj

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 06:22 AM

That's part of overclocking. I have yet to run across a 6750 that wouldn't go to at least 3.3ghz with little or no voltage bump. That makes a difference. As long as you don't get crazy with voltage, the stock cooler is adequate.

I guess I can try 3.3GHz. When you say little voltage bump, how much increase are we talking about?
What should the max temperature be?

I really wouldn't put more cash into a Socket 775 at this point. The CPUs are legacy products and Intel is still overpricing them. DDR2 memory cannot be carried over into future builds. You will be throwing cash at what is essentially a dead end. Figure in also you will have to get a 64bit OS to deal with 4gigs of memory.

Save the cash and build either a new Quad Phenom AMD or Intel 1156.


Good point.
So I just read what is 1156. So it's the socket type (for example 775 on my current system)?


If I were itching to burn cash in the short term to improve performance, I might consider an SSD to put my working files on to help disk access issues when working on big files.


I have to know if the slowdown is actually from the software (Lightroom) or from accessing the files.

Leo

#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 11:09 PM

Overclocking will get you a little extra life in that system and yes, if you get 4GB or more of RAM, you will need a 64-bit operating system to use it all. Socket 1156 is a CPU socket. Intel likes to have several sockets out at once and retire them relatively quickly, often without backwards compatibility. Intel will be releasing a new socket sometime next year called LGA 2011 which replaces the LGA 1366 used in the higher-end Intel i7 CPU's. SSD's may help with performance, but they are usually at their best when accessing multiple files. Overhauling the PC, replacing the motherboard, CPU, and RAM will not be anywhere near as expensive as completely rebuilding the computer from the ground up since you can reuse many of the older parts from your old system. I strongly suggest not even thinking about XP Pro, especially the 64-bit edition, which will be leaving support entirely April 2014. You may have to simply swallow the cost of a new monitor calibrator or somehow get it to work in Windows 7. Which monitor calibrator are you using, by the way? Your current PC should easily be able to run Adobe Lightroom 3 which requires a Pentium 4 for better CPU, 2GB or more of RAM (More is always better), and Windows XP or later, as it says here.

Edited by DJBPace07, 21 July 2010 - 11:10 PM.

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#5 RainbowSix

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Posted 23 July 2010 - 12:15 PM

Software which lists Windows XP only on the requirements often/always does so because there was no Vista or 7 at the time. There are a few games designed for XP that I haven't gotten to work with Windows 7, but that is a rare occurrence. Don't forget about the Windows XP mode in Windows 7 Pro/ultimate.

Edited by RainbowSix, 23 July 2010 - 12:15 PM.

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#6 s1lents0ul

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Posted 23 July 2010 - 12:37 PM

Yes, as far as the Windows Xp Compatibility goes, Professional and Ultimate versions of Windows 7 have the XP Compatibility mode, basically a virtual enviroment to run those programs.

Go with a new build, save money for the I-7 930(approx. 250$) and OC to 4.0ghz(easily done based off newegg reviews) get a mobo with eSata and 3.0 usb, (209$) from gigabyte, you can use which ever video card u require in crossfire and eyefinity. use about 8GB of ram, 2x4gb and that system will fly, power it right and cool it with aftermarket cpu cooler and some nice heat sink gel and your set man.
==]--s1lents0ul-->

#7 DJBPace07

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Posted 23 July 2010 - 11:47 PM

The XP compatibility mode in Windows 7 is, if my memory is right, limited in terms of performance. Also, OCing a brand new non-Extreme or Black Edition CPU is not a good idea while it is under warranty. Depending on how Adobe Photoshop works, you may see a benefit with the new six-core AMD CPU's. That is, if they can use all the cores. If you're going to wait to build a new PC, don't bother looking up reviews since technology changes constantly.

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