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Should The Us Government Continue To Control The Internet?


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21 replies to this topic

Poll: Should the US government continue to control the Internet? (20 member(s) have cast votes)

Should the US government continue to control the Internet?

  1. Yes (9 votes [45.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 45.00%

  2. No (11 votes [55.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 55.00%

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#1 yano

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Posted 21 October 2005 - 04:22 PM

Do you think the US should continue to control the Internet?

If you don't know already about the history of the Internet, then you might want to read up on that.
Scroll down for History of the Internet.


[quote name='http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/internet/09/30/internet.control.ap/']U.S. insists on controlling Web
Friday, September 30, 2005; Posted: 4:51 a.m. EDT (08:51 GMT)

GENEVA, Switzerland (AP) -- The United States refuses to relinquish its role as the Internet's principal traffic policeman, rejecting calls in a United Nations meeting for a U.N. body to take over, a top U.S. official said.[/quote]

Also...

[quote name='http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/internet/09/30/eu.us.internet.ap/index.html']EU, U.S. set for Internet showdown
Friday, September 30, 2005; Posted: 11:20 a.m. EDT (15:20 GMT)

BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP) -- The European Union insisted Friday that governments and the private sector must share the responsibility of policing the Internet.[/quote]

more...

[quote name='http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/internet/10/20/congress.internet.reut/index.html']Lawmakers urge U.S. to keep control of Web
Thursday, October 20, 2005; Posted: 10:58 a.m. EDT (14:58 GMT)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) -- U.S. lawmakers are urging the Bush administration to resist a push from other countries to shift control of the Internet to the United Nations, arguing that such a move would stifle innovation and free expression.[/quote]

Personally I think the government should continue to controll the Internet. We made it, so why just give it away? We've been controlling the Internet for the last 15-20 years, so why let the UN control it when they would want to redo the entire setup we have of the Internet. And since we haven't had any major problems with the US government controlling the Internet I dont' see how it could get any better with an International body.

So what do you think?



[quote name='http://www.isoc.org/internet/history/cerf.shtml']History of Internet
In 1973, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) initiated a research program to investigate techniques and technologies for interlinking packet networks of various kinds. The system of protocols which was developed over the course of this research effort became known as the TCP/IP Protocol Suite, after the two initial protocols developed: Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and Internet Protocol (IP).

In 1986, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) initiated the development of the NSFNET which, today, provides a major backbone communication service for the Internet. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Energy contributed additional backbone facilities in the form of the NSINET and ESNET respectively. In Europe, major international backbones such as NORDUNET and others provide connectivity to over one hundred thousand computers on a large number of networks.

A great deal of support for the Internet community has come from the U.S. Federal Government, since the Internet was originally part of a federally-funded research program and, subsequently, has become a major part of the U.S. research infrastructure.


Over its fifteen year history, the Internet has functioned as a collaboration among cooperating parties. Certain key functions have been critical for its operation, not the least of which is the specification of the protocols by which the components of the system operate. These were originally developed in the DARPA research program... but in the last five or six years, this work has been undertaken on a wider basis with support from Government agencies in many countries, industry and the academic community. The Internet Activities Board (IAB) was created in 1983 to guide the evolution of the TCP/IP Protocol Suite and to provide research advice to the Internet community.

During the course of its existence, the IAB has reorganized several times. It now has two primary components: the Internet Engineering Task Force and the Internet Research Task Force. The former has primary responsibility for further evolution of the TCP/IP protocol suite, its standardization with the concurrence of the IAB, and the integration of other protocols into Internet operation (e.g. the Open Systems Interconnection protocols). The Internet Research Task Force continues to organize and explore advanced concepts in networking under the guidance of the Internet Activities Board and with support from various government agencies.

Two other functions are critical to IAB operation: publication of documents describing the Internet and the assignment and recording of various identifiers needed for protocol operation.

The recording of identifiers is provided by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) who has delegated one part of this responsibility to an Internet Registry which acts as a central repository for Internet information and which provides central allocation of network and autonomous system identifiers, in some cases to subsidiary registries located in various countries. The Internet Registry (IR) also provides central maintenance of the Domain Name System (DNS) root database which points to subsidiary distributed DNS servers replicated throughout the Internet.[/quote]

http://www.isoc.org/internet/history/cerf.shtml


(moderator edit: added a live link to the ISOC document quoted; greatly reduced and edited original content published because of fair use considerations. jgweed)

Edited by jgweed, 24 October 2005 - 12:57 PM.


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#2 acklan

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 09:32 AM

The "International body" does not want because they can do a better job. They want it because we have it.
Who would run it? The UK... yeah right.
Oh great I had to bring them up.
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#3 ddeerrff

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 11:40 AM

The U.N.?!?! That is a particularly incompetent organization. What a mess that would be.
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#4 acklan

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 12:13 PM

Point, set, match. :thumbsup:
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#5 Scarlett

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 12:32 PM

U.S. insists on controlling Web
Friday, September 30, 2005; Posted: 4:51 a.m. EDT (08:51 GMT)

GENEVA, Switzerland (AP) -- The United States refuses to relinquish its role as the Internet's principal traffic policeman, rejecting calls in a United Nations meeting for a U.N. body to take over, a top U.S. official said.




The U.N.?!?! That is a particularly incompetent organization. What a mess that would be.


I so agree ddeerrff
Excuse me. LMAO The UN can not even police thier selves.
They must be highly delusional!

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#6 jgweed

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 12:34 PM

As bungling an institution as the US Government is (and that may be, from the point of liberty, a good thing) to put the Internet in the hands of an even worse organisation would be a great risk. We all know how China, Iran, and many other nations represented in the UN view freedom of expression on the web, and would enjoy nothing less than the talibanisation of it's content. Currently, the Internet is in the hands of quasi-official bodies of computer experts and it has flourished by being left alone.
John

Edited by jgweed, 29 January 2006 - 09:06 AM.

Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#7 acklan

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 01:49 PM

The first step the UN would I suspect would be to appoint North Korea as the chair to the Commite of Free Speech.
Like Libya was appointed to the Commite for Human Rights.
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#8 rms4evr

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 10:39 PM

I don't think ANYBODY should have control. However, since that is not an option, I would GREATLY prefer the U.S. to the U.N. The U.N. tries too hard to be 'politically correct,' and not anger anybody, even if they are openly violating the rules (ie Iraq, before the war). I just don't trust them to police the world wide web. They probably wouldn't enfore any of the rules.

#9 acklan

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 11:38 PM

The UN! The convicts are running the prison. It would be like letting Jeffery Dalmer baby sit your son.

EDIT: Oops! Sorry Britannia.

Edited by acklan, 26 October 2005 - 02:10 PM.

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#10 blackrider

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 09:25 PM

I don't think they should but I think they can without our knowledge. Maybe they are already doing so.

#11 BlackSpyder

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 02:52 AM

the internet is a free place not bound by boarders or anything of that nature. The UN cannot control major problems in todays society with out a fuss. Look at it we got an AIDS plauge going on in Africa, along with their fammine, Koreans buliding Nuclear warhead (among others), a war to protect the world from the likes of Islamic Extremists Terrorists that they say is unfounded, and people think they could control something that over what 500 million people access everyday with more places to go then anywhere imaginable (except space). I laugh @ that idea

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#12 phawgg

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 04:06 AM

I'd like to see an independent body of qualified individuals "control it".
Non-governmental in nature.
Representatives on that "council" being qualified by virtue of their
expertise, not their political affiliation.

The US may indeed have assisted in a large manner the development of the internet,
but they certainly did not do it alone.
By any means.

Therefore, I contend with the US government presuming control.


Of course, I also dislike it's position(s) of control, based on economics, military strengh,
predominate religious practice(s) or even the notion of democracy
being inherantly better than other sucessful global disciplines.
patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...

#13 hvacer

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 02:30 PM

why not give it to the UN, they dont have anything better to do.

#14 acklan

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 05:12 PM

I'd like to see an independent body of qualified individuals "control it".
Non-governmental in nature.
Representatives on that "council" being qualified by virtue of their
expertise, not their political affiliation.


Who would decide this? What would be the enforcement arm? The World Court? Who will finance it? What happens if, like the United Nations, it becomes corrupt? What if with best intentions if falls into the control of an elite few? If a crime was committed on the internet would the country effected no long have a right to pursue the offender? Would it only be the responsiblility of the new consortium to pursue internet crimes? Extactly what benifit would there be, opossed to the way it is ran right now? Adapting "Moore's Law" to the internet it's self, is not the internet out pacing "Moore's Law"? Doubling every 18 months? What do you do when this "independent body of qualified individuals" makes a disccion that contradicts the best interest (example vhs vs. beta video standard)? This body of "independent body of qualified individuals" makes a disccion based on money (a company), or field (peer) pressure? What will be your recourse? Coup d'état ?

I started on the intenet in '93 with DOS and 2400 baud (2.4 kbs) and have observed most of the good and bad parts of the development of the internet. Until it is a clearly mis-management by the present body(s) it should stay as is. I just don't see the down side of letting things go like they are. The more I hear it it sounds like a good old fashion power struggle.

IMHO
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#15 Scarlett

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 05:42 PM

I agree acklan, leave it as is.
Why would anyone want the government control the internet? So we could live like the Chinese. No thanks!
And for God's sake, I hope the corrupt UN never get's their hands on it.

Edited by Scarlett, 29 January 2006 - 05:56 PM.

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