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Exploit.aurora - not sure if my computer is cleaned entirely


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#1 tintong

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 06:10 AM

Hi there,

A couple of nights ago I was getting a few pop-ups from AVG for an exploit.aurora threat, I removed the infected files a few times, ran malwarebyte, and ran AVG again and it seems to be fine. Funny thing is though, it turns out one of my gmail accounts was also exploited in the same last few days, so now I'm a little paranoid, worried it might have already key-logged a whole bunch of stuff, and I'm afraid there might be something running in the background still.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you!
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#2 quietman7

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 06:15 AM

If you were the victim of an Internet scam, fraud, hacking or identity theft, you should disconnect the computer from the Internet and from any networked computers until it is cleaned. If your computer was used for online banking, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it, all passwords should be changed immediately to include those used for banking, email, eBay, paypal and any online activities which require a username and password. You should consider them to be compromised and change each password using a clean computer, not the infected one. If not, an attacker may get the new passwords and transaction information. Banking and credit card institutions should be notified immediately immediately of the possible security breach and you should file a report with your local law enforcement agency. Failure to notify your financial institution and local law enforcement can result in the refusing to reimburse funds lost due to fraud and similar criminal activity. For more detailed instructions as to what you should do, please read:If you have not done so already, supplement your anti-virus by performing scans with trustworthy security tools like:You can also get a second opinion by performing an Online Virus Scan like:
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#3 tintong

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 12:22 PM

Just did a few scans using the scanners you recommended, and it came up clean. Thank you so much!

#4 quietman7

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 01:20 PM

You're welcome.

If there are no more problems or signs of infection, you should Create a New Restore Point to prevent possible reinfection from an old one. Some of the malware you picked up could have been backed up, renamed and saved in System Restore. Since this is a protected directory your tools cannot access to delete these files, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. Setting a new restore point AFTER cleaning your system will help prevent this and enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state.

The easiest and safest way to do this is:
  • Go to Posted Image > Programs > Accessories > System Tools and click "System Restore".
  • Choose the radio button marked "Create a Restore Point" on the first screen then click "Next". Give the R.P. a name, then click "Create". The new point will be stamped with the current date and time. Keep a log of this so you can find it easily should you need to use System Restore.
  • Then use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recently created Restore Point.
  • Go to Posted Image > Run... and type: Cleanmgr
  • Click "Ok". Disk Cleanup will scan your files for several minutes, then open.
  • Click the "More Options" tab, then click the "Clean up" button under System Restore.
  • Click Ok. You will be prompted with "Are you sure you want to delete all but the most recent restore point?"
  • Click Yes, then click Ok.
  • Click Yes again when prompted with "Are you sure you want to perform these actions?"
  • Disk Cleanup will remove the files and close automatically.
Vista and Windows 7 users can refer to these links: Create a New Restore Point in Vista or Windows 7 and Disk Cleanup in Vista.
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