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Soldering an AC adapter to motherboard


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#1 Aether176

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 12:28 AM

Hello Bleepingcomputer, I Googled for a good computer help forum and this was the first result, so I'm hoping that you can help me.

I have an old HP DV1000 laptop that I haven't used for a long time. Its AC port is bad. I left it on a couch, so it overheated and melted some components that it needs to charge with a cord. The computer repair store said that it would cost $800 to fix, so I got a new laptop. This old one still works if you put a charged battery in it, though. Sometimes I want a computer to use for high-demanding programs so that I can use mine without any slowdown. I'm looking to make the old laptop this computer.

My question to you is this: Is there any way that I can solder either of my two chargers (standard AC adapter or external battery charger) onto one of two places (either directly to the motherboard or to the battery contacts under the laptop) so that I can keep this old laptop on without the need for a battery to be placed in it? Yes, I'm aware that it would always need to be plugged in this way, but I'm not looking to travel anywhere with it. I'd just leave it at the house plugged in. Yes, I know it's not generally recommended to do this, but I'm not looking to repair any parts, only solder some stuff onto it for a quick fix to make an always-plugged-in computer.

If it's possible, could you possibly give me some instructions on where to solder the cables? If not, thank you for your time.

Edited by Aether176, 13 July 2010 - 12:30 AM.


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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 09:16 AM

The best way would just be to replace the power jack on the mobo. The jack number is PJ019.

http://www.outletpc.com/c8528.html Just one place of many to buy from.

Those particular jacks can be a bear to resolder. Investing $5 in a desoldering tool is a wise investment.

You can directly solder a power supply to the motherboard (but a socket is still less than $10 shipped), but I have no idea of the proper traces to solder to. If you pull the lappy apart and look at the power socket, it should be evident what is power and what is ground(s).

Edited by dpunisher, 13 July 2010 - 09:17 AM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#3 Platypus

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 09:57 AM

If overheating has damaged the componentry that steers the supply connections between battery and mains supply, and controls the battery charging, then I think it's unlikely you'll be able to get around that without repairing the circuit. It's that circuit that converts the higher voltage from the PSU to the lower voltage necessary to run the laptop and charge the battery, including cutting off to prevent overcharge.

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#4 dpunisher

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 10:08 AM

Yeah, the main thing that screws up a jack replacement is motherboard damage. When the jack breaks it pulls and cracks the solder joint. The resistance causes heat and if you run it long enough the heat delaminates/etches the traces (usually the power + trace(s)). Ground planes due to their area are usually a bit more heat resistant.

Edited by dpunisher, 13 July 2010 - 10:09 AM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)





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