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Wireless Router/Windows7


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#1 Calebvision

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 03:22 PM

Presently, I have a router with two desktops.

I just bought a notebook for my daughter with Windows 7. I wantt o get a wireless router so that she can use the laptop.

Do I go a buy a wireless router and set up the desktops like now and, somhow, the laptop wil also be able to access internet???

Does the fact that the laptop have Windows 7 and desktops have XO mateer?

Can anyone recommend an inexpensive router??

What is the rage of wireless?

Any feedback wil be appreciated

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#2 MrBruce1959

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 07:21 PM

Hello and welcome to Bleepingcomputer.

When using a router it does not matter what OS you use to connect to it as long as the Ethernet card is installed in each and functioning properly and the wireless device has an wireless card.

Wired devices through the ports located on the router will connect automatically, as long as the router is set as an DHCP server, it will automatically assign each computer its own IP address to have its own unique identity, like that of a row of houses on a street has its own street address for mail delivery.

You have to enable the wireless function in the routers built in firmware, and assign it a broadcast name also called SSID and a pass phrase to make it impossible for others to hi-jack your wireless connection.

There are security features built into routers to prevent people from leeching off your bandwidth, but that gets too deep into the discussion here.

I do not know what brand of router your looking to buy, there is link sys and NetGear routers.

There are B and G routers but todays standard is Wireless N.

I can seriously make this post 1000 words or more and end up with a complete book here before I am done.

I can only recommend routers I have personally used my self and my present Wireless N router is the NetGear WNR2000 V2. I have had no issues with it or its signal strength and range.


Hope this helps.
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#3 Calebvision

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 06:26 PM

Thnaks very much dor the input!

I bought a Belkin ( hope that's correct ) and began the instalation process. Couldn;t get it done...called company and they told me that the box an d outer didn't match because of some sort of packaging mistake! Went back to Wal-Mart and got a NetGear. I think that I will atempt it this comign weekend.

Again, thanks!

#4 MrBruce1959

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 06:39 PM

You are very welcomed. :thumbsup:

If you have any problems or questions, feel free to come back to this thread and post them and we'll try to assist you.

Bruce.
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#5 boethe

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 06:51 PM

I suggest you work through the installation in stages. First get your desktop working so that you at least are back to your current situation. Then try to establish connection to your laptop with no security to establish you have signal strength and the wireless adapter on the laptop can detect the new router. Without security the only thing you need to worry about is setting the SSID for the router. Once you have established the connection you can turn on security. Simplest is probably going to be WEP with a 5 character password. You can work up to higher security level as you get comfortable with the control on the router. You will likely control the router by going to a specified URL from a browser in a connected desktop.

If you look in this forum I recently had a thread discussing my experience turning up the security level on my router to WPA/AES and connecting two laptops and a printer. Going in stages instead of trying for the complete bells and whistles in the first try really worked for me and got me comfortable controlling my router.

#6 Calebvision

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 05:25 PM

You are very welcomed. :thumbsup:

If you have any problems or questions, feel free to come back to this thread and post them and we'll try to assist you.

Bruce.



I have a NetGear N300 ( sound right? ). I tried installing and didn't get far as I was met by this message:Your computer does not have a network adapter that is configured correctly

I unhooked it and re hooked "old router". In retrospect, I think that, in the trnafer, I placed the cables in wrong slots. I wil try again soon!

Any thoughts??? All help is welcome!

#7 Calebvision

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 05:27 PM

I suggest you work through the installation in stages. First get your desktop working so that you at least are back to your current situation. Then try to establish connection to your laptop with no security to establish you have signal strength and the wireless adapter on the laptop can detect the new router. Without security the only thing you need to worry about is setting the SSID for the router. Once you have established the connection you can turn on security. Simplest is probably going to be WEP with a 5 character password. You can work up to higher security level as you get comfortable with the control on the router. You will likely control the router by going to a specified URL from a browser in a connected desktop.

If you look in this forum I recently had a thread discussing my experience turning up the security level on my router to WPA/AES and connecting two laptops and a printer. Going in stages instead of trying for the complete bells and whistles in the first try really worked for me and got me comfortable controlling my router.



Thanks! What is a SSID??? WEP???

Yeah...I was wondering how the laptop would receive the signal! It will be in another room!!

#8 boethe

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 06:16 PM

SSID is service set identifier. This is the name you give you router which you then use to identify it with your laptop. This is so you can differentiate your router from your neighbors which will have a different SSID. Your laptop will likely be able to see your router and several of your neighbors; you will get a list of SSIDs to choose from when you look for a wireless network from your laptop.

WEP is Wired Equivalent Privacy. This is the most basic encryption method for a wireless connection. You turn this on and set a 5 character password so that you neighbors don't connect to your wireless. If you can see your neighbors SSID and they don't have something like WEP enabled you could connect to their wireless and the internet through their router. You want to block someone from doing this to you because they might spy on your internet activity, do something illegal through your internet connection or just use up a tremendous amount of bandwidth on your account (probably while doing something illegal).

#9 Calebvision

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 08:06 PM

SSID is service set identifier. This is the name you give you router which you then use to identify it with your laptop. This is so you can differentiate your router from your neighbors which will have a different SSID. Your laptop will likely be able to see your router and several of your neighbors; you will get a list of SSIDs to choose from when you look for a wireless network from your laptop.

WEP is Wired Equivalent Privacy. This is the most basic encryption method for a wireless connection. You turn this on and set a 5 character password so that you neighbors don't connect to your wireless. If you can see your neighbors SSID and they don't have something like WEP enabled you could connect to their wireless and the internet through their router. You want to block someone from doing this to you because they might spy on your internet activity, do something illegal through your internet connection or just use up a tremendous amount of bandwidth on your account (probably while doing something illegal).


Hi! Quick question...we set it up and even laptop "gets" internet, however, we're still getting thsi message: You must have an existing physical ethernet conenction from the computer to a modem router or gateway.

Any idea what this is about????

#10 ReviverSoft

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 08:24 PM

Ok, so where is the laptop "getting" the internet from? the Wireless Router, correct?
Now is that Wireless Router connected to a modem (or PC) using an Ethernet cable?

Edited by ReviverSoft, 13 July 2010 - 08:26 PM.

ReviverSoft - Happy to help!

#11 Calebvision

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 05:09 PM

Ok, so where is the laptop "getting" the internet from? the Wireless Router, correct?
Now is that Wireless Router connected to a modem (or PC) using an Ethernet cable?



Yes it is!

#12 Calebvision

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 05:15 PM

I'm learning as I go along! Can we set up the two destops so that they don't neef the cables and, if so, how???

Thanks for the help and patience!

#13 MrBruce1959

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 06:59 PM

The answer is yes.

There are two ways to do this....

1) You would have to purchase two wireless cards one for each of the two computers and install each one of them in an empty PCI slot in each of your computers.

2) you can purchase two USB wireless adapters one for each of your two computers. These plug into a unused USB port, some come with an extension wire, but I find those cause a weak signal, so I do not use that wire, its better to just plug the adapter into the USB port and skip using that wire.

Check the NetGear web site for both. In fact here's a link to wireless adapters. http://kb.netgear.com/app/products/list/p3/43

Kind regards.

Bruce.
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#14 ReviverSoft

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 08:07 PM

Can we set up the two destops so that they don't neef the cables and, if so, how???

As MrBruce1959 pointed out, it has to be either a PCI or USB based Wireless Adapter for desktop PCs.
ReviverSoft - Happy to help!

#15 Calebvision

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 06:55 PM

The answer is yes.

There are two ways to do this....

1) You would have to purchase two wireless cards one for each of the two computers and install each one of them in an empty PCI slot in each of your computers.

2) you can purchase two USB wireless adapters one for each of your two computers. These plug into a unused USB port, some come with an extension wire, but I find those cause a weak signal, so I do not use that wire, its better to just plug the adapter into the USB port and skip using that wire.

Check the NetGear web site for both. In fact here's a link to wireless adapters. http://kb.netgear.com/app/products/list/p3/43

Kind regards.

Bruce.



Thanks! Anyone OK??? Any idea, approximetly, how much the cost???




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