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Could there be an hidden swap file?


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#1 JorgeO.555

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 07:51 AM

Hello,

SinceI have 4GB RAM (but only 3 accessible) and do not keep lots of windows open at the same time, I decided not to use a swap file.
I had some improvements as with the desktop icons not taking long to refresh, etc.

But sometimes I hear HD noises aking to swap file munching for a few seconds. This activity is not shown in Task Manager.

Could there be an 'hidden' swap file or equivalent?

Thanks,

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#2 Platypus

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 08:51 AM

Numerous things can cause drive activity.

Windows writes to log files. Some applications maintain scratch files on the hard drive, and they'll be accessed at various times. The NTFS file system uses delayed writes, which can be committed to disk in batch writes if the system has been busy and the write queue reaches the maximum permitted delay.

Also, if there is no swapfile, and a larger memory allocation is requested than there is free memory available at the time, a module or modules that would otherwise have been paged to disk in the swapfile will have to be unloaded from memory. It will then be re-loaded from its original drive location when RAM becomes available again. (This is actually not as fast as being reloaded from the swapfile.)

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#3 cryptodan

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 11:26 AM

I would highly recommend using a page file. Your drive activity could be the direct result of not having one.

#4 JorgeO.555

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 08:44 PM

Thanks, guys.

I've tried both with and without the swap. Liked the later better.

Rgds,

#5 Platypus

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 10:37 PM

If you find it works best for you, then that's quite OK.

Keep in the back of your mind that if Windows runs out of real memory at any time, it is likely to crash quite hard. So if you have system instability at some time, check first by re-instating the swapfile in case it's just that, before trying other solutions.

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