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New PC build


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7 replies to this topic

#1 JEK23

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 05:13 PM

Hey everyone,

My laptop just died and I have decided to build my next machine. It's been more than a few years since my last one and I'm not as up-to-date with components as I used to be. Here's a preliminary list:

Cooler Master Cosmos
ASUS Mobo
I7 930
Power Supply
Memory
HDD
Video Card
Blu Ray

I am pretty uncertain on the video card specifically, there are so many out there. I don't want to spend more than about $100 on one right now.

I am also unsure about which version of Windows to go with, home premium or professional.

I will also have to get a monitor and keyboard/mouse. I am trying to keep the total as close to $2000 as possible. Lower would be great!

Thanks in advance for any insight!!!

Josh

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#2 RainbowSix

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 10:59 PM

What will you be using this PC for? A few changes can save you a lot of money.

Have you considered AMD? You get more bang for the buck with them, and the motherboards are far cheaper. I can tell you right now that there is no reason to spend that much on a motherboard. If you go with an ASUS Crosshair IV Formula motherboard and AMD Phenom II X6 1090T, you will save about $140.

Change the hard drive too. SATA 3 is useless for hard drives unless you use RAID. This will do just as good a job: Western Digital Caviar Black WD1001FALS ($15 saved)

That video card is terrible. Put the money saved on the previous items toward the video card. For your build, get a Radeon HD 5770 at minimum.

There is no need for that large of a power supply. The power supply needed is largely determined by the video card(s) and how many there are. The 5770 only requires a 450W PSU minimum, or 600W in two-way crossfire. Other cards in the Radeon HD 5 series have similar requirements, but check the specific video card requirements with the amperage and everything. It's good to have more than enough. The CORSAIR CMPSU-750TX is a popular choice for gamers.

Go with Windows 7 home premium unless you are into networking. As far as I know, the only real difference between the two is the ability to back up to a network server.

Edited by RainbowSix, 01 July 2010 - 11:05 PM.

[ Antec 1200 v3 | Gigabyte GA-890FXA-UD5 rev. 3.1 | AMD Phenom II x6 1090T (overclocked to 4GHz) | Corsair XMS3 4x4GB DDR3 1600 | COOLER MASTER Silent Pro 600W & Visiontek Juice Box 450W | SAMSUNG 470 Series 64GB SSD | WD Caviar Black 640GB & Samsung Spinpoint 2TB HDD | 2x XFX Radeon HD 5770 in Crossfire | SAMSUNG 22X DVD±RW | Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64-bit]

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#3 DJBPace07

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 11:05 PM

I find your build a little odd, so much power with a whimpy graphics card. Since you have to repurchase a monitor, keyboard, mouse, and I would imagine speakers, too, I suggest an AMD build to stretch your budget as much as possible. Those peripherals, especially a decent monitor, can eat a large chunk out of your budget.

Case: ENERMAX Uber Chakra ECA5001B Black Aluminum - Shipping with computer cases will be expensive. This is a full ATX case with plenty of room for expansion. Cases with side windows, fans, or vents, tend to be a little louder than those that don't. $114

Monitor: ASUS MS238H Glossy Black 23" 2ms Ring stand & Ergo-fit LED backlight - Asus makes excellent products. This is an LED monitor with HDMI and a very fast refresh rate. Given it's LED backlight, the blacks are very deep and it is extrememly thin. $209

Keyboard: Saitek PZ30AUR - This is a backlit keyboard great for gaming or typing. I had this keyboard until recently, it was great but after five years of heavy use, the paint started to wear off. $39

Mouse: Logitech M500 Tilt Wheel USB Corded Laser 1000 dpi Mouse - This is one tough mouse, I've been using it for over five years for gaming. Laser mice are usually better at that, as are wired mice. Some people don't like wires, but I don't find them that distracting. $33

Speakers: Logitech Z523 40 Watts RMS 2.1 Speaker System - A decent pair of desktop speakers. I have Logitech speakers, but not this model. I wasn't sure if you needed this, but I'm including it anyway. $84

Motherboard: ASRock 870 EXTREME3 AM3 AMD 870 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard - This is a value priced AMD motherboard. Like all AMD 8xx motherboards, this will take socket AM3 CPU's, DDR3 RAM, USB 3.0, and SATA 6. Because this is a value oriented motherboard, it does not have amazing Crossfire (The ability to use two or more AMD/ATI graphics cards) speeds. For that you need a more expensive AMD 890FX motherboard, like the GIGABYTE GA-890FXA-UD5. $109

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black Edition Deneb 3.4GHz - This was tricky, you didn't list any use case for this PC. The Phenom II X4 965 is a good CPU but it doesn't quite reach the i7 930 in terms of speed. It is usually about 5 frames per second slower depending on setup and application. However, it is $100 less expensive. Like all Black Edition CPU's, this CPU has its multiplier unlocked, making overclocking very easy. If you do video encoding or use applications that are heavily threaded, the AMD Phenom II X6 1090T Black Edition Thuban 3.2GHz is a good choice. That six core CPU runs best with highly threaded applications, but with games, many of which can barely use four cores let alone six, you won't see much benefit at all with that CPU. $179

RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 - RAM prices are really going down these days. About $100 for a single 4GB stick of DDR3 is very impressive. 4GB is more than enough for most users, if you manipulate large amounts of data, you may want to buy two sticks. Remember, you need a 64-bit operating system to use 4GB or more of memory. $107

Power Supply: CORSAIR CMPSU-850TX 850W - Unless you are using two monster graphics cards, like the Radeon 5970 in Crossfire, a 1000W power supply is overkill. With high-end graphics cards, about 800W is the about all you will really need, even if you load the PC down with many devices. This PSU is more than enough to meet your needs. Other good brands to consider, Silverstone, Seasonic, PC Power, and Thermaltake. $129 (After $20 mail-in rebate)

Video Card: SAPPHIRE 100282-3SR Radeon HD 5850 (Cypress Pro) 1GB - This is one of the fastest single GPU cards on the market. I have no idea why you would want to use a sub $100 graphics card given the power the rest of the PC has. If you want something less expensive, I would go for the SAPPHIRE 100283-3L Radeon HD 5770 1GB which is about as powerful as a Radeon 4870. Like all Radeon 5 series graphics cards, this comes with DirectX 11 and EyeFinity. $289

Optical Drive: LG Black 10X Blu-ray Burner - Bulk SATA Model WH10LS30 LightScribe Support - Blu-Ray is the future and this is an inexpensive drive that can read and write to Blu-Ray's, DVD's, and CD's. $139

Hard Drive 1: Intel X25-M Mainstream SSDSA2M080G2XX 2.5" 80GB - Given your budget, you can get a SSD (Solid State Drive). This drive is extremely fast, small, and should last a bit longer than a traditional platter-based hard drive. Given the small size, it is suggested that you only install the operating system on this drive along with one or two of your most frequently used apps on it. $215

Hard Drive Accessory: ICY DOCK MB882SP-1S-1B 2.5" to 3.5" SSD & SATA Hard Drive Converter - The SSD is 2.5 inches in size and there are not 2.5 inch drive bays in the case. This will convert a standard 3.5 inch drive into a 2.5 inch one capable of holding the SSD. $19 (Before $5 mail-in rebate)

Hard Drive 2: Western Digital Caviar Green WD10EARS 1TB 5400 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb - This will hold all of your data and, given its size, lots of it. $69

Operating System: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit OEM - Unless you are using this PC at a business where EFS and other higher-end operations are needed, Home Premium is more than adequate. This article will explain the editions, complete with a helpful graph comparing features. $94

Grand Total: $1,841 (Before rebates and shipping)

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#4 JEK23

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 12:45 AM

Thanks for the replies.

I will be using this for CAD, Photoshop, Illustrator, and possibly some audio recording later, and I like to mess around with Blender. In addition to the everyday stuff (web, word, excel). Possibly a little gaming here and there.

The video card was just kind of a place holder. I really just hadn't gotten to researching them at all. It was one of the first one's I saw on Newegg.

I was really under the impression that Intel was the way to go. I have read that AMD is a good value though. I have never really used any AMD processors before.

As far as motherboards go, I've always been partial to ASUS, but I think that's mostly because that's what I'm most familiar with.

Would I be able to notice a difference between 4GB of 1333 or 4GB of 1600? Or other speeds for that matter?

And would a SSD make that much difference as my system drive? I mean the numbers do look good. I just don't have any experience with them.

I do have a mouse/keyboard/speakers. I will probably just replace those as I can later.

Bottom line is, I really just want a computer that I will be able to use for a lot of years to come. I thought that seemed to be pretty upgradeable. Would any of that change suggestions? I probably should have included some of that in the first post.

Thanks again.

Josh

#5 dpunisher

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 05:45 AM

I am a bit puzzled as well by the combo.

You will need a 3 stick set of memory, at least a 3 X 2gig setup, preferably 1600 speed, as you have 3 memory channels on an X58 system. This has been my go to choice for the last 3 i7 9XX builds:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...20231225

Here is another choice for a motherboard that will save you a few bucks: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16813131614
That ROG series Asus is only useful if you are going with more than 2 videocards. Just too expensive for what you get. (IMHO) I am partial to Asus and Gigabyte boards.

Ditto on the above choices of power supplies. The HX1000 isn't a bad PSU, it is very reliable, but compared to the other Corsair offerings (HX850/HX750) it lacks a bit. If you don't need a modular PSU, then a TX will work fine.

Good suggestions above for video cards. Your pick is not a happy one.

SSDs, up to you. If you have the money they are really nice, but I am a tightwad when it comes to storage. I prefer the "old school" WD Blacks still. I will wait for SSDs to get to the $1/gigabyte barrier and then I will be a buying fool.

As far as a futureproof system, both Intel and AMD are changing their sockets after this generation. By the end of 2011, it will be a different hardware landscape. In your situation, I might be tempted to go with an Intel P55 setup. Less money, and darned near the same speeds as the X58 setups. P55s are Intels mainstream, and in most cases hold their own against the more expensive offerings.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList....amp;srchInDesc=
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList....amp;srchInDesc=

Edited by dpunisher, 02 July 2010 - 05:52 AM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#6 DJBPace07

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 10:37 PM

Intel and AMD are both CPU brands, they do the same thing and install very easily. Aside from price and performance at the higher end CPU's, there really aren't any significant differences between the two brands once you get past some architecture designs. I chose AMD to save you more cash but if you want to go Intel, I do have suggestions for that. A Phenom II X4 should be more than sufficient for what you are wanting. Dpunisher does have a good point with sockets, both AMD and Intel will be changing at the end of 2011. Some CPU's from the upcoming sockets should be backwards compatible. Intel has a history of frequently changing sockets whereas AMD tends to say with a socket for several years. As far as motherboards go, Asus is a good brand as are ASRock, Gigabyte, XFX, and eVGA. Aside from chipsets and a few value add's, like dual BIOS's, boards are pretty similar hardware wise. Other exceptions include warranty, price, and quality, though, keep in mind that all boards, and most computer equipment in general, are mass produced with varying degrees of fluctuation. With RAM, there isn't much of a difference between DDR3-1333 and DDR3-1600. If you can get 1600 at the same price or lower than 1333, get it, but don't worry about a drop in performance. SSD's have extremely fast read/write cycles, this makes them very fast for frequent hard drive access, which happens at startup. There are also no moving parts in an SSD to wear out, though, they too have a lifespan and won't last forever, but longer than a platter-based drive. SSD's will not help gaming as most of the data is accessed and copied into memory for later use.

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#7 JEK23

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 10:41 PM

Hey guys,

Thanks for the info. Have a look at this and let me know what you think.

As far as the processor... I found an Intel Core I7 930 for $199. That seemed like a pretty good deal so the rest followed.

Cooler Master Cosmos

ASUS P6X58D - E

Corsair PSU

GSkill RAM

Sapphire 5770 card

WD HD

ASUS Monitor

And I was thinking of just going with Windows 7 Home Premium. Does anyone have any advice on purchasing a full version as opposed to on OEM version? Also, any suggestions on a blu ray player? The one I had in the original post is sold out at NewEgg.

Thanks again guys,

Josh

#8 DJBPace07

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 11:34 PM

$199 is a good price for the i7 930. MSRP on the i7 930 is too much for me to suggest it for most builds over the Phenom II X4 965, but at that $199 price, it can be in the reasonable category, depending on how much you're willing to pay. Remember, most games use the graphics card more heavily at higher resolutions. I would also go for the 23-inch Asus monitor I suggested as it uses less power, has free shipping, and has deeper blacks due to the LED backlight for a little less than the one you chose. Again, it depends on how much that extra inch is worth. Same thing is true with the case. You could also go with a less expensive X58 motherboard, like the ASRock X58 Extreme 3 LGA 1366 Intel X58 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 to save some cash. The Blu-Ray burner in my build is now in stock. As for the OEM vs. full retail thing with Windows 7, there is no difference aside from the licensing. OEM versions are paired to the motherboard and cannot be moved, though, there are no technical reasons preventing this. Full versions can be moved as in delete from old PC, reinstall on new PC. If you go through PC's very quickly, one every year or two, then a full version is suggested, otherwise, save the cash and go OEM.

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