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Cleaning Program for Windows 7


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#1 bonzacomp

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Posted 28 June 2010 - 03:12 PM

Hello

Can anyone recommend a program for cleaning old/junk files on windows 7

Thanks
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#2 Jacee

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Posted 28 June 2010 - 04:53 PM

CCleaner http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner

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#3 Layback Bear

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Posted 29 June 2010 - 09:27 AM

I also use Ccleaner and found it to do a great job. IMHO don't use the registry part of the cleaner!!!

#4 kennzsniper

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Posted 29 June 2010 - 03:37 PM

Yeah CCcleaner and you might want to check out the defragger. Its free as well and fast.
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#5 Rorshack

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Posted 29 June 2010 - 03:56 PM

Revo Uninstaller, I've used it for a while and it's does the job. After a program is uninstalled it gives you the option to search for files still left on the computer.
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#6 bonzacomp

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 05:31 AM

Thanks very much everyone for your suggestions!

Cheers!

#7 Layback Bear

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 08:13 AM

I like Rorshack use Revo to remove unwanted programs. It's the best I have ever used. Please use it just like it instructs you to.

#8 MarcusW

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 04:47 AM

I use Tuneup Utilities 2010. I've used TU before (2008 is a free version - but you have to scout around for the clues, seriously! It is, but I doubt it would be of any great use on Windows 7). I don't use the registry defragger - which has only once really messed up my system (I learned very quickly not to use that), but generally it's a very nice easy to use program. It's good for cleaning out the old files and getting rid of junk as well as doing other not so important and impractical things - like changing the log-on screen image and stuff. The 2010 version isn't free though, but there is a trial version of it if you want to check that out.

#9 Layback Bear

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 09:33 AM

It's nice to see so many people reading this subject of how to keep there system clean. Some how if we can get this many people to look into how to keep there system safe, anti virus, anti malware, and anti spyware, firewalls the long list in Am I infected? What do I do? would be a lot shorter. A clean computer and a safe computer kind of go together.

#10 cryptodan

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 11:41 AM

I use Tuneup Utilities 2010. I've used TU before (2008 is a free version - but you have to scout around for the clues, seriously! It is, but I doubt it would be of any great use on Windows 7). I don't use the registry defragger - which has only once really messed up my system (I learned very quickly not to use that), but generally it's a very nice easy to use program. It's good for cleaning out the old files and getting rid of junk as well as doing other not so important and impractical things - like changing the log-on screen image and stuff. The 2010 version isn't free though, but there is a trial version of it if you want to check that out.


Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

• Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.

• Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

• Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.

• Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.

• The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.XP Fixes Myth #1: Registry Cleaners

Edited by cryptodan, 06 July 2010 - 11:41 AM.


#11 MarcusW

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 05:22 AM

I use Tuneup Utilities 2010. I've used TU before (2008 is a free version - but you have to scout around for the clues, seriously! It is, but I doubt it would be of any great use on Windows 7). I don't use the registry defragger - which has only once really messed up my system (I learned very quickly not to use that), but generally it's a very nice easy to use program. It's good for cleaning out the old files and getting rid of junk as well as doing other not so important and impractical things - like changing the log-on screen image and stuff. The 2010 version isn't free though, but there is a trial version of it if you want to check that out.


Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:



Thanks for picking me out to be made an example of. I feel honored and privelaged. Whilst this forum may well NOT reccommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers, it goes without saying that there is more to TU than just 'registry cleaning/optimizers'.
It also contains pretty much the same tools already supplied by Windows 7, but tends to do the same job just as well - like defragging the hard drive, or uninstalling programs, or pretty much anything else you could otherwise easily get hold of through the use of the Windows OS or tweaking the Windows settings for other things like changing icons or the way the system's interface appears - all these can be done if you know what you're doing, but if you don't, or like me you're just plain lazy (which I'm not saying anyone is, so please don't pick me out for another example), this just simplifies things somewhat. I wonder if I had stipulated that in using the registry defrag tool, or the registry cleaning tool that, OUT OF HABIT, I ALWAYS create a system restore point before I go messing around with something that could just as easily mess up my system as it could cleaning it up.

Co-incidentally, whilst you took the time to very nicely quote me on my suggestion of TU2010 for the purpose of cleaning, revo uninstall does the same thing, and still entails the ability to remove registry entries. So long as you stick with the safe option for scanning, this may not be a problem, but if you go moderate or advanced, who knows what a less experienced computer user is going to end up doing just because they might be feeling extra adventurous in their dealings with the OS on that day. But hey...whatever. Your point is still valid, but I don't think it was entirely fair to just pick my sorry behind out just for making the point you made.

#12 Layback Bear

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 05:59 AM

IMHO cryptodan is not picking you out MarcusW. Any time some one post anything about registry cleaning, fixing, defraging, or any thing else to do with the registry you will see that a B/C Advisor or the like post that warning. As you continue reading here you will see it posted all over this site.Also IMHO the registry is no place for 99.9999 % of us to messing with. :huh: to Bleeping Computer and good morning.

#13 cryptodan

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 08:54 AM

I have seen Tune Up Utilities cripple systems to the point they need to be completely reformatted and rebuilt from scratch, also I have seen it cripple programs and prevent them from starting up. There is nothing good about anything that proclaims they can make your PC run smoother, faster, more efficient, and what not. I do not use any tuneup applications and my computer is rock solid and stable. I used to use CCleaner until I came here, and learned just how much of an idiot i was for using it. Its a placebo effect.

While Revo Uninstaller does clean out the registry of old settings it only does it for those applications that you do it too. It doesnt perform what I call a brute force attack on the registry and completely cleans any and all registry values it deems as invalid, incorrect, and what not. Programs like TU, CCleaner, and others should only be used by experts who know what they are doing.

The registry contains over a million entries, and removing the wrong thing can make your computer an expensive paper weight. I learned that lesson the hardware when trying to remove a piece of hardware manually. I permanently disabled a PCI Slot in my computer, and the only way I could fix it was by reinstalling windows. I only navigate the registry to places I know what it does such as the CurrentVersion and Run keys in their perspective hives and directories. Other then that, I let my Windows Operating System handle the registry and everything else.

#14 MrBruce1959

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 03:38 PM

I have to agree here with Cryptodan, he is 100% correct with his warning to you all about programs that can just delete registry keys without really understanding the point of the key in the first place.

Although I use some parts of CCleaner's functions, I do not allow it to delete file associations or unused extensions, I basically use it to delete anything that ends up as a startup program, rather than using MSConfig to disable a startup.

So I have to agree, based on the many systems I have had to repair which were cleaned with registry cleaners or the like.
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#15 cryptodan

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 03:42 PM

I have to agree here with Cryptodan, he is 100% correct with his warning to you all about programs that can just delete registry keys without really understanding the point of the key in the first place.

Although I use some parts of CCleaner's functions, I do not allow it to delete file associations or unused extensions, I basically use it to delete anything that ends up as a startup program, rather than using MSConfig to disable a startup.

So I have to agree, based on the many systems I have had to repair which were cleaned with registry cleaners or the like.


Thank you Mr Bruce.




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