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c drive too full


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#1 letitsnow009

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 09:40 PM

hello, my computer is running extremely slow = start up takes about 5min w/o norton virus scan, and 10 min with norton virus running in the background. Everytime I open a browser or program my computer lags big time. i have a sony vaio pcv-rs 410 256 MB RAM running windows xp home edition. I have 2 hard drives ( c and D). C is 99% full, i have only 606mb left of 15 GB. I have done virus/malware scans, used ccleaner, and uninstalled to free up my c drive but to no avail ( only freed up 300 mb). I am pretty sure the reason why my computer runs slow is because it doesn't have enough space on the c drive. The contents under c drive are "programs" "documents and settings" "printer" and "google". I would like to transfer "documetns and settings" from my c drive to my d drive ( which is about only 10% full). I would like to know the safest way to do this? I don't want to lose my settings etc. i am a newbie to this, thnks




also, when i ran malwarebytes it found 25 infected files but after that, it came clean. All anti virus reports i have is clean. I also emptied temp folders . I couldn't defrag because it said i need 15% free space on my c drive , which i don't have. I hav also run a dskchk and it came out clean. Also, I have about 38 processes running right now, and i have disabled programs on start up.Pls help me resolve this problem. thank you.

Edited by letitsnow009, 20 June 2010 - 09:47 PM.


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#2 noknojon

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 10:28 PM

i have a sony vaio pcv-rs 410 256 MB RAM running windows xp home edition. I have 2 hard drives ( c and D). C is 99% full, i have only 606mb left of 15 GB

Your only options are to either delete some of your files or load some required files/documents on to CD to move/store them elsewhere -
The unit will need defragging due to the over loading but first you must Move/Delete enough material -
If you have the other option of adding more ram to the main system then that may give you just enough space to play with -
A paper bag will only hold so much until it gives out at the seams .
This is a typical case of expecting too much from what you are working with -

Thank You -
EDIT - Basic settings are usually required for normal running - If you have items like Pictures , Music , Drawings etc these are the items to move/save to CD - What are the Google items that require keeping ??

Edited by noknojon, 20 June 2010 - 11:08 PM.


#3 tg1911

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 10:53 PM

I would like to transfer "documetns and settings" from my c drive to my d drive ( which is about only 10% full). I would like to know the safest way to do this? I don't want to lose my settings etc.

I don't know about the Documents and Settings folder, but you can move your My Documents folder to anywhere you want to.
Mine, and the wife's, are located on my I: drive.

Click Start, right-click My Documents, and select Properties.
Click the Target tab, if it's not already selected.
Click the Move button, click where you want to move My Documents to, to highlight it, then click OK.
Click Apply.
This will start the move, and leave "pointers" behind, so the Operating System will know where the files are.
After the move, when you click Start / My Documents, it will open the file from the location, where you moved it to.

You might want to consider making a folder, to move My Documents into.
One with your username on it.
If you just move it to a partition/drive, My Documents will occupy the whole partition/drive.


By creating it's own folder, My Documents will only occupy, that folder.
The folder with your name on it will be considered the My Documents folder, for you.
When you click My Documents, that's the folder that will open.

An example:
Say you're moving My Documents from C:, to G:
In G:, create a folder with your name.
G:/user

If you have other user's on the computer, you can do the same thing.
Just go to their accounts, and move them the same way.

Depending on the size of your My Documents folder, this might free up the space you need
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#4 Queen-Evie

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 08:46 AM

I have another suggestion for you. One thing that people don't normally think of when a system runs slow-your security program.

Not all security products are equal. What works for me may not work for you. Sometimes a program won't play nice with your system. Even if you've never had problems with it in the past it's possible that an update causes it to affect your computer in adverse ways. Many people run Norton, and have no problems with it. Others experience system slowdown using Norton. (I'm mentioning Norton because YOU have it installed. Other people find McAfee, etc does the same thing to their systems).

Unfortunately, the only way to find out if Norton is affecting your computer is to uninstall it.

If this is something you decide to try, first turn on the Windows firewall.

Uninstall Norton using Add Remove programs, then run the Norton Removal tool found HERE

IF Norton is one of the culprits, install something else. If not, reinstall Norton.

Now for transferring Documents and Settings to another drive.

You will not be able to move the entire folder. If you try, a message will appear telling you

Documents and Settings is a Windows system folder and is required for Windows to run properly. It cannot be moved or renamed


TG mentions you can move My Documents, so that's something you can consider doing.

#5 Papakid

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 11:52 AM

Yes, I didn't think you could move the whole Documents and Settings folder, because that contains your user profiles, which are set up in the Windows registry like mini operating systems with a registry database of their own--thanks for confirming that Queen-Evie. :thumbsup:

But you can move subfolders of your user profile, such as My Documents, as tg1911 has pointed out. That should free up a lot of space--depending on how much you use My Documents. You can also move your Temporary Internet Files folder--that's Internet Explorer's browser cache and History. This way you won't have to continually clear your cache (with CCleaner or other methods) just to free up space on your C drive. To do so, open Control Panel, Intenet Options and under the General tab, click the Settings button in the Browsing History section, then the Move Folder button in the dialogue that pops up. Then browse to the folder you want to move it to--I would go with tg1911's suggestion and make a folder on your other hard drive with whatever your user name is--then OK out when done.

I was going to say you might could move your Temp folder from your user profile on the C drive but that is probably considered a system folder so it's probably better not to try.

Another thing you could do would be to uninstall all of your programs and then reinstall them on the D drive. When you install choose the custom installation option and then point it to a folder on your D drive to install to.

But, as already pointed out, 15 GB is a pretty small hard drive. XP SP3 with all patches/updates is nearly 7 GB, so that's almost half of your drive right there. You might be better off using your other hard drive to install Windows to.

You do need to have at least 15% free space, but another big reason your computer is slow is you don't have enough RAM. I wouldn't run XP with less than 512 MB. 1 GB or more is better if your motherboard supports it. Especially since you are running Norton and especially if your version of Norton is from before 2007. I noticed a great improvement when I upgraded RAM and got rid of Norton, so I agree with Queen-Evie on that. I would suggest going with Windows Live Essentials Microsoft Security Essentials for a while and see how that suits you.

Reason for edit: I confused MS Security Essentials with Windows Live Essentials--MS needs to figure out what really is essential--security is, the others aren't. Thanks to Queen-Evie for pointing this out to me.

Edited by Papakid, 22 June 2010 - 07:23 PM.

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#6 strolln

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 12:18 PM

Are your C: and D: drives separate physical drives or are they partitions on the same physical drive? If they are on the same physical drive then you could shrink the D: partition and extend the C: partition.
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#7 Queen-Evie

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 12:55 PM

I found this, which is from 2003, which adds nothing to the discussion but does explain the small hard drive:

This review is from: Sony VAIO PCV-RS410 Desktop (2.66-GHz Pentium 4, 256 MB RAM, 120 GB Hard Drive, DV+RW/CD-RW Drive) (Personal Computers)
Reasonable priced machine for DVD writer, 120 GB hard disk, fireware ports and USB 2.0 ports which are all very useful to use a digital camcorder with.
Small things I wish could change about the machine:
1) The C drive is partitioned to be 14 Gb only, too small if you want to install lots of software or having lots of stuff under My Document folder.
2) 256 MB is not enough for Movie Maker, lots of page faults.
3) No system CDs, you have to make your own from hard disk image.

Customer Review at amazon.com



Strolln asks a valid question. IF you have 2 separate drives, how big is the D: drive? You could switch the drives and make it the new C: drive if it's the larger of the two. Or you could keep the drives as they are and do as Papakid suggested and install programs on your D: drive and move pictures, music, etc to D. How much space you gain by moving the folders depends on how large they are.

Papakid mentioned Microsoft Security Essentials as an option. It's certainly something you can try. One thing to keep in mind about WLE is that it does NOT include a firewall. It's anti-virus/anti-malware only. It would be your choice to use Windows firewall OR install a stand-alone firewall program.

Stay away from all-inclusive suites. Those generally do tend to be resource hogs and the ones which may not play nice with a system.

Another thought: Investigate alternatives to programs you have installed. Some programs are large and there may be smaller alternatives. An example: Adobe Reader, which when installed wants to install toolbars along with it. Then it constantly nags you to check for updates. An alternative would be Foxit Reader.

You would have to research (or ask us) for alternatives.

Edited by Queen-Evie, 22 June 2010 - 05:54 PM.


#8 strolln

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 03:24 PM

Based on the info Queen-Evie posted, I'm pretty positive that you have a single physical hard drive that is partitioned into smaller drives. There is probably a restore partition, then a partition for the C: drive and another partition for the D: drive. You can use EASEUS Partition Master (free software) to first shrink the partition for the D: drive which will create free space on the disk. Then you can extend the partition for the C: drive into the newly created free space. You can accomplish this without losing any data or programs, although it's a good idea to make a backup beforehand, just in case.

My sister had a similar Sony desktop and I used the EASEUS software to make her C: drive larger, worked like a charm. The hardest thing is deciding how much space to devote to each of the partitions!

This is assuming that your D: drive is nowhere near full. If the D: drive is also nearly full then you won't be able to shrink it to be able to extend the C: drive.
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#9 Papakid

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 11:50 PM

How are you coming along letitsnow009?

I don't normally edit posts this late, but because of a major error I have and thought I would let you know so you will be sure to notice it. Please see my previous post, the reason for the edit is listed at the bottom. I also usually link to what I mention, but I'm getting lazy in my old age. But here it is--I hear it is much less invasive than most other AV's: http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/

Please let us know if you have any more questions or need more help. I think the partitioning suggestion is a good one, but it might be kind of daunting, so just holler if you need more guidance.

The fate of all mankind, I see

Is in the hands of fools

--King Crimson





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