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Computer completely crashing randomly.


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#1 blaster_rifle

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 04:06 PM

So the type of crash I'm talking about is when I'm doing something on the computer (anything EXCEPT running a full-screen game, so far, at any rate, but I play those for hours at a time) and suddenly my mouse can't move, the screen does not change, and the only way to shut of my computer is by unplugging it/holding down the power button long enough for the cpu to cut the power to the modem. No other way works, as far as I know, and there is no way to 'unfreeze' it. At first I assumed it was just some very occasional thing, because it only happened as windows XP was loading up at the beginning, and that it was a hardware issue due to my computer being old. Of course, this might be the case, but I want to make absolutely sure if it is.

Summary: Computer crashing on startup or a random time after I get on (anywhere from 2 minutes to ~30 hours).

I read the 'before you post' guide and ran a DDS scan and am running a GMER scan, but since this part said not to post logs, just tell me if I should do anything with them. These have become more frequent over the past two weeks or so, to the point that it's seriously hampering my ability to do things on the computer. Any and all help is greatly appreciated. Thank you very much.

~Blaster.

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 07:57 AM

Crashes (BSOD), unexpected shutdowns, sudden freezing, random restarting, and booting problems could be symptomatic of a variety of things to include hardware/software issues, overheating caused by a failed processor fan, bad memory (RAM), failing or underpowered power supply, CPU overheating, motherboard, video card, faulty or unsigned device drivers, CMOS battery going bad, BIOS and firmware problems, dirty hardware components, programs hanging or unresponsive in the background, and sometimes malware. Even legitimate programs like CD Emulators (Daemon Tools, Alchohol 120%, Astroburn, AnyDVD) can trigger crashes, various stop error messages and system hangs. If the computer is overheating, it usually begins to shutdown/restart on a more regular basis. Troubleshooting for these kinds of issues can be arduous and time consuming. There are no shortcuts.

When Windows XP detects a problem from which it cannot recover, it displays Stop Error Messages which contain specific information that can help diagnose and resolve the problem detected by the Windows kernel. An error message can be related to a broad number of problems such as driver conflicts, hardware issues, read/write errors, and software malfunctions and malware. In Windows XP, the default setting is for the computer to reboot automatically when a fatal error or crash occurs. You may not see the error code because the computer reboots too fast.

An easier alternative is to turn off the automatic reboot feature so you can actually see the error code/STOP Message when it happens - this is also known as the Blue Screen Of Death (BSOD). To change the recovery settings and Disable the Automatic Restart on System Failure in Windows XP, go to Start > Run and type: sysdm.cpl
Click Ok to open System Properties.

Alternatively you can just press WINKEY + Pause/Break keys to bring up System Properties.
  • Go to the Advanced tab and under "Startup and Recovery", click on the "Settings" button and go to "System failure".
  • Make sure "Write an event to the system log" is checked and that "Automatically restart" is unchecked.
  • Click "OK" and reboot manually for the changes to take effect.
This can also be done in the Windows Advanced Options Menu as shown here here by pressing the F8 key repeatedly like you would do for entering safe mode.

Doing this won't cure your problem but instead of crashing and restarting you will get a blue diagnostic screen with an error code (as shown in this example) and other information to include file(s) that may be involved which will allow you to better trace your problem. Write down the full error code and the names of any files/drivers listed, then provide that information in your next reply so we can assist you with investigating the cause. Without that specific information, we would only be guessing rather than troubleshooting.

When was the last time you cleaned the inside of your computer? Dust restricts the airflow and prevents proper cooling. This in turn can cause overheating and faulty processor fans which can result in unexpected shutdowns, random restarts, booting problems, etc. If you use a notebook, they get dirty too and need to be cleaned.
  • Clean out the vents on the computer with a can of compressed air using short bursts to ensure that they are not clogged with dust.
  • Unplug the computer and everything from the back of the unit (be sure to note where to plug it back in).
  • Open the case and clean out any dust and debris you find inside. Be careful not to aim the compressed air directly at the circuit board or electronic components.
  • Important! Be sure to discharge any static electricity BEFORE you touch any of the components by touching the bare metal inside surface of the case. Do this FREQUENTLY while you are working.
  • Check all the electrical connections and make sure the fans are all operational.
  • Remove the cards and RAM modules, clean the contacts and reseat them.
  • Check the heat sink on the processor to ensure it is not blocked with dust or debris.
  • Remove the CPU's cooling unit and clean the fins on the heat sink that sits under the CPU with a can of
    compressed air.
  • Feel the CPU heatsink when it powers down. It should be warm to very warm but not hot.
  • Inspect the thermal compound between the CPU and heat sink as it can deteriorate over time so. You may need to remove it, scrape away the old thermal gel that makes contact with the processor, then apply a very thin coat of fresh thermal gel on the surface and fit the heat sink back in place again.
  • Inspect the capacitors on the motherboard for leaking, bulging, foaming, or discoloration.
  • The airflow inside the case is from front-to-back and from bottom-to-top. Carefully arrange the cables so that the airflow will be unobstructed when closing the case.
  • Continue to monitor the temperature of your CPU, motherboard, hard disks, voltages, and fan speeds.
  • FOR LAPTOPS: Obviously, you cannot open the case. However, dust will build up inside a laptop as well. Use the compressed air to blow out all of the ventilation holes.
How to Clean a Computer Tutorials with Screeshots:Note: Some video cards can generate such intense heat while playing games with high quality graphics that they require a separate cooling system. If the fan fails after wear and tear with age, the video processor will not be far behind and your system may start crashing.. If the video card needs replacing, see "Illustrated How to Replace an AGP Video Card".

Suggestions for troubleshooting power supply, video card, CPU, RAM, MB and hard drive:You can use BurnInTest to stress test the CPU, hard drives, RAM, CD-ROMs, CD burners, DVDs, sound cards, graphics, network connection, printers, video playback. This utility works on all Windows versions to include Vista (32-bit & 64-bit).
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#3 blaster_rifle

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 01:29 PM

Hi! First of all, I would like to sincerely thank you for your time and help.

I can confirm that automatically restart was already unchecked and 'write an event log' was checked when I looked at those settings. It doesn't seem like I am able to get any error message, because I have to manually cut the power whenever the freeze-crash happens. If they still keep logs of things like that, maybe I can go look for those.

With regards to cleaning my computer, that is a very good idea. I was thinking about doing that myself. At the moment I can't get a compressed air can. Can using a duster or something like that be alright, or is there a risk of damaging hardware?

And I will definitely check out those links for troubleshooting each hardware device and seeing if any of them is faulty, because it seems like this is not, in fact, any kind of virus. And if it isn't, well, thoroughly cleaning my computer for the first time in five years is a really good idea anyway.

Thanks again ^^. I will reply when I complete the instructions and hopefully it will fix the problem.
~Blaster

#4 quietman7

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 01:48 PM

I can't get a compressed air can. Can using a duster or something like that be alright, or is there a risk of damaging hardware?

Cans of compressed air are cheap and sold at many places. Small hand held vacuums are another option but they cost significantly more money. I however, use a combination of both.
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#5 blaster_rifle

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 09:37 PM

"When I turn it on... It freezes WHILE the operating system is loading" --- "This is probably a software problem not covered in this hardware guide. If you are using Windows, try booting into safe mode by holding down the "F8" key or in some cases the "CONTROL" key."

I found this on the How To Diagnose PC Hardware Problems, and while I still need to buy a can to get a really good clean done of my computer, this intrigued me because it's exactly how this whole problem started. The computer would freeze while loading XP and I had to restart.

Update: It restarted itself once now, so I loaded in safe mode and apparently it restarted itself there too before I logged in. I guess I'll just wait to reply until I clean the computer out well ._. Thanks for the help again.




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