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Motherboard comparison


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Zebug

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 08:35 AM

I will be building a comp for the first time in a few weeks, but this post really isn't about what motherboard I should get, but rather I will be using any responses as a learning tool for me. Take the comparison at the link shown below for example:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Productcompa...5^13-130-275-TS

Both boards are the same until you get to the "Memory Standard" section. The Gigabyte one has DDR3 1866(OC)*/1333/1066 whereas the MSI has DDR3 800/1066/1333/1600 (OC), does this simply mean that the Gigabyte can go up to 1866 (if overclocked) and 1333 MHz under normal operations? Based on this alone, the gigabyte would be a better buy correct? (and for the sake of discussion, if possible ignore name brand recognition).

I haven't really read about SATA/RAID stuff yet but both the MSI has 0/1/5/10 whereas the Gigabyte has 0/1/5/10/JBOD....what do those numbers mean? From what I can tell just by using google, RAID is for multiple hard drives but I am only going to be using one hard drive so do I even care about these numbers (or am I totally wrong and this RAID stuff is something different)

Thanks all, this forum rocks.

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 05:47 PM

You do not care about RAID :thumbsup:.

The memory standards stated for a board...indicate the range of RAM module speeds that can be accommodated with (hopefully) no hiccups. The numbers represent the RAM module speeds.

Louis

#3 Zebug

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 09:54 PM

awesome man, thanks a million. I'll get this computer stuff down one of these days....its the main reason I am going to build one, simply to learn more about it.

So if I were to throw the RAM linked below into both motherboards would it not work for the Gigabyte one since it doesn't list 1600 as one of the memory standards? OR does it mean the Gigabyte can easily handle it since it goes all the way up to 1866?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...-_-NA-_-NA-_-NA

Edited by Zebug, 12 June 2010 - 09:59 PM.


#4 hamluis

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 09:49 AM

Combining RAM and motherboard and CPU...is always something of a crapshoot, IMO.

Some motherboards are more finicky with what RAM modules they play nicely with...than others.

Neither all motherboards nor all RAM modules are created equal...even if they advertise the same specs. That (IMO) is one of the reasons that system builders do burn-in testing before shipping...to ensure that all components play well together.

I know that you want a simple answer...but the real answer doesn't occur until the system is booted.

If a user matches the specs of the motherboard and CPU...with the type of RAM purchased...he/she has a high chance of success, IME.

If a user has any doubt...many motherboard and CPU manufacturers often list "preferred RAM modules." These are modules which have been tested and are known to perform optimally with said products.

Example for 1 board: Example Only

Example for 1 CPU: Example Only

Not the answer you want, I'm sure...but it's the most honest answer I can give. A user just has to do sufficient research...before building/upgrading...so that there is no reason to invite others to punish her/him with less-than-gentle kicks.

Louis

#5 Zebug

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 08:31 PM

good stuff man, thanks. Honest answers is all I can ask for so it is much appreciated. I'm really getting hooked on this computer stuff though....could become an expensive hobby:)

#6 hamluis

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 01:31 PM

It's not expensive...unless you are a gamer :thumbsup:.

Any system made in the last 3-5 years...can handle the daily routines of people like me (don't game).

Louis

#7 Zebug

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 03:44 PM

ya....I'm a gamer, I've fallen off the radar the last 2 years though with the birth of my first son, but I'm getting the itch again and the current machine just can't handle today's games...hence the building begins. Thanks again for the info.

#8 keller

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 10:17 PM

As someone who has been building my own systems for about 10 years, I would highly recommend looking at manufacturer web sites to find the so-called "preferred" RAM/Motherboard/CPU combinations. Generally I start with the CPU and work out from there. I know AMD publishes lists of motherboards that they have tested and probably RAM as well, though I haven't looked in a long time.

In the past I've tried to save money by buying a motherboard that wasn't specifically listed on the AMD site as compatible, and had nothing but problems. That's not to say that will always happen, you just give yourself a better chance if you go with something that's already been tested.

As hamluis says, it can be kind of a crapshoot. Electronics are sensitive and its entirely possible that, after all your research and hard work, you get a motherboard or other component that's dead right out of the box! (It's happened to me more than once.) The site you linked to has exceptional service in my opinion, and while getting a bad component is annoying at least you can get a replacement without too much hassle. Not trying to scare you, just prepare you for all possibilities :thumbsup: . Building your own system is rewarding and still has many advantages over buying one off the shelf, especially if you really want to learn more about computers. Have fun!




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