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roof leaks and ceiling repairs


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11 replies to this topic

#1 Martel

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 10:57 PM

I repair leaky roofs and the ceilings damaged by them.

Let me know if you are battling one of those issues maybe I can shed some light.

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#2 DeathStalker

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 12:57 PM

So come on down to Atlanta and finish the job I working on now lol. All that's left is sanding, final coat of mud, sanding and painting the ceiling......... :thumbsup:

#3 Martel

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 03:08 PM

The final coat is the most important.

If it's 800 boards or a single patch the final coats make or break you.

Make sure put on plenty of mud, cut your edges and wipe it tight.

Sanding is last ....did I say wipe it tight...?

Actually, I had an office in Lawrenceville GA back about 1990.



wipe it tight, several tight coats are better than heavy cvoats.
Posted Image

This pic is before sanding

Edited by Martel, 12 June 2010 - 04:56 PM.


#4 DeathStalker

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 05:14 PM

LOL I lived in Lawrenceville until 8 years ago. Right off Five Forks Trickum.

I hate finishing sheetrock. I'm a carpenter. I can take a tree and make you a house or a piece of furniture, but I HATE finishing sheetrock. Unfortunately on small jobs you can't hire anyone to do it. I could'a got 1000 folks to come hang and finish a house, but on two little ceiling parts that took 1, 16 inX 4 foot piece of rock and the other that took 1 2x2 piece of rock, you can't get anyone to come out. it's just too little work to justify the price. I'm managing the property so I had to be there anyways, no trip charge X's 4.

Edit: I forgot to ask my question: The nature of the leak was such that one edge of the rock I replaced (ceiling) butted up to the wall. The wall has wallpaper on it so I can't put a piece of tape and finish it like I normally would. It's a tight fit, I made sure of it, is there any problem with carefully caulking that joint?

Edited by DeathStalker, 12 June 2010 - 05:16 PM.


#5 Martel

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 08:15 PM

To answer your question yes caulk is ok, but if you hang it right you may not even need that. If you do caulk it wipe it with a wet rag to slick it out.. (Make sure the wallpaper is protected with blue tape where you caulk, unless it is vinyl wallcovering).
If possible stay away from the wall with the wallpaper. (cutting the ceiling about 10" away).
Use a piece of blue tape to run across the top edge to protect the wallpaper, hang a piece of plastic from that blue tape. If it is a string cloth be super careful with it.
First thing put a drop cloth or piece of plastic on the floor to catch fallout. (it will save you a bunch of cleanup).


If you can't stay away and must pull the drywall out from above the wallpaper then be real, real, real careful when you extract the ceiling piece.
Mark the ceiling where you wanna cut it out and score it with the utility knife, score it over and over and over and over till it is 99% cut through, then it will come out real easy.

Also the corner tape is going to need to be cut right in the corner with a sharp utility knife. (where the wallpaper meets the ceiling).


Remove the damaged ceiling piece, you do not have to cut it back to a truss but cut it pretty square. then use a piece of 1x4 as a nailer.

Posted Image
Install your new piece it should slip in a slot above the wallpaper. (Normally the ceilings are hung first then the walls are pushed up, helps hold the ceiling up).
Important use a factory edge to slip in above the wallpapered wall.

Posted ImagePut a piece of self adhesive fiberglass tape on the flats.
Put a coat of mud over the fiberglass tape and wipe it tight. (make sure to cut your edges) leave it smooth, don;t worry about how it looks just wipe it tight.

Posted ImageDon't leave any edges with your mud cut your edges with your mud knife.
If you want get a bag of 45 or 20 minute mud and mix up small batches you can do all your coats back to back.
Recoat it wiping it tight every time, forget about how it looks, just wipe it tight, after the 3rd or 4th coat it will disappear.

#6 DeathStalker

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 09:17 PM

Not to be a smart ass, but if I could have cut it even 1 inch away from the corner/ceiling joint I would have lol. Trust me. I didn't cut that thing in the hardest place to patch it because I thought it would be fun to try............

EDIT: Just read your post again. Thanks for the tips, but it's a done deal. It just needs painting now.

Edited by DeathStalker, 12 June 2010 - 09:18 PM.


#7 Martel

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 09:53 PM

If you have a piece of the paint from the tear out take it to Sherwin Williams - Duron and they can color match it.
Use a roller to paint it ..double coat it using the roller in both directions plenty of paint.

You should be able to match it without painting the entire ceiling.

#8 DeathStalker

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 10:40 PM

After being a contractor for 30 years, I think I can safely say that the color of the ceiling is ceiling white. :thumbsup:

Seriouslt though, thanks for the tip. I might not have known. It's amazing now how you can take a chip in and they scan it on their computer and match that thing right up.

Another tip in case someone doesn't know, it that if it's a SMALL area, upshot by Kilz is actually colored to be an "aged" ceiling white. I've never had much luck with it though. It (upshot) has always run or dripped on me. Have you ever tried it Martel?

#9 Martel

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 10:58 PM

Yes, seems like I have tried just about everything.

You can use regular kilz to fog in ceiling stains on a textured ceiling. (gotta fog it in keep your distance)

Another trick is bleach in a spray bottle. fogging the stain with bleach a couple of times letting it dry between coats can erase stains.


On the ceiling whites, there are several different shades..

Behr, Valspar, Glidden, Duron, Sherwin Williams, Duron, Porter, Benjamin Moore.... all differ

Also, builders have their own blend of ceiling white.

Pulte, Portrait, Ryan, KB, Horton, Beazer, Centex, Ryland, Wieland and more... use certain wall and ceiling colors

#10 DeathStalker

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 11:25 PM

I learned something there just from your description. "fogged" I never thought of it, but I know exactly what you mean when you say it. Thanks. I may try that sometime when the circumstances are right.

One thing I love about building. You can NEVER know it all.

#11 Robert55

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 01:00 AM

I use ProFlex RV. It has worked good but is messy. It has stopped my leaks ..well for now it is a GMC. I use to use PlL Polyurethane like was listed below until my RV service said they had better results with ProFlexRV.

#12 Martel

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 09:02 AM

That ProFlex RV looks like some good product.

I have been using it's cousin Geoceal 4300 for years, it is unstoppable.




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