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About to install Ubuntu as a dual boot w/ Vista...


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Bezukhov

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 02:18 AM

A few questions about Ubuntu.

For starters I am using an eMachine ET 1161-07 with Vista Home Premium sp2. Last week I installed a second hard drive (Seagate ST31000528AS). Successfully, too, I should add, to my great surprise. I did this because I wanted to play with Ubuntu without messing around with partitioning the original hard drive.
I have burned the iso disc and it works fine. I spent an hour using the demo mode via the DVD drive. I will be partitioning the Seagate drive as soon as I am done defragging it (I probably didn't need to do that step, but I have time to spare) and installing Ubuntu there.

Anyways:
1) How much space should I dedicate to Ubuntu? I have several hundreds of GBs to play with.
2)Should I, or do I, have to reinstall my wireless adapter in Ubuntu's partition so that Ubuntu will recognize it?
3) Will my programs that I downloaded for Vista be available for Ubuntu to use, or will I have to download them again, such as Avast, Audacity, Malwarebytes, etc.?
4) If I am using Ubuntu will I still be using Internet Explorer, or does Ubuntu have it's own browser?
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#2 Andrew

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 03:49 AM

For the system itself you don't need all that much space. A standard Ubuntu install won't take up more than 5GB or so of space. Be sure to leave room for growth, though!

Wireless adapters can be tricky in Linux. It's much easier to set up than it was several years ago, and many wifi devices are automatically detected and set up, but sometimes they aren't. In any event, whether Ubuntu automatically sets it up or you have to do a little work to set it up yourself, whatever you've got in Windows has no effect in Ubuntu and vice-versa.

If you have a program installed in Windows, it will NOT be transferred to Ubuntu. Additionally, many programs are Windows only, but have Linux counterparts. Some programs are completely unnecessary in Linux. Malwarebytes and Avast are unnecessary. Audacity is one of the many programs that is available in both Windows and Linux versions.

Ubuntu ships with the Firefox web browser. Firefox is considered by most people to be vastly superior to Internet Explorer. There are hundreds of other web browsers out there too.

#3 Bezukhov

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 08:47 AM

Thanks for the info, Andrew. I finally installed Ubuntu on the hard drive that I wanted to. And it only took me around 18 hours to figure it out. As a matter of fact I'm composing this answer on Ubuntu. My greatest concern was how my network adapter would respond to the change in the OS, but that turned out to be the least of my worries.
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#4 strolln

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 09:27 AM

Glad you got things working. Is that 18 hour figure accurate? I don't think I would have the patience to stick with an installation for 18 hours. I would have decided it wasn't worth the effort.

In the future, instead of dual boot, you might consider something like Oracle's VirtualBox. I have several versions of Ubuntu installed as Virtual Machines on my Win 7 system. One advantage to using VirtualBox is that you can run Linux apps from your Vista desktop. You could also go the other way and install VirtualBox on your Ubuntu machine and run Vista from Ubuntu.

Wireless nics are no problem in VirtualBox, it would use the Vista drivers to access your nic then emulate a nic so it would appear to Ubuntu that you have a wired connection.

Edited by strolln, 08 June 2010 - 09:29 AM.

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#5 Bezukhov

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 10:23 AM

Glad you got things working. Is that 18 hour figure accurate? I don't think I would have the patience to stick with an installation for 18 hours. I would have decided it wasn't worth the effort.

In the future, instead of dual boot, you might consider something like Oracle's VirtualBox. I have several versions of Ubuntu installed as Virtual Machines on my Win 7 system. One advantage to using VirtualBox is that you can run Linux apps from your Vista desktop. You could also go the other way and install VirtualBox on your Ubuntu machine and run Vista from Ubuntu.

Wireless nics are no problem in VirtualBox, it would use the Vista drivers to access your nic then emulate a nic so it would appear to Ubuntu that you have a wired connection.

Yes, 18 hours. What I lack in technical skills are more than made by my stubborness.
I'll look into Virtual box. I think I had something like that with WUBI a couple of months ago when I was checking out the 9.4 version. Would VirtualBox allow me to use some older Windows OS like 95 or 98? I have only been using a computer for a year and thought it would be interesting to get a feel for what it was like years ago using a computer.
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#6 strolln

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 11:22 AM

Yes, VirtualBox supports some older versions of Windows as well as DOS for Guest OS's.

Here's a link to the list of supported Guest OS's: Guest_OSes - VirtualBox

Edited by strolln, 08 June 2010 - 11:38 AM.

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#7 Andrew

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 12:20 PM

For the most part, Virtual Box will run any operating system that can be installed on an x86 processor.




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