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Formatting a used HDD for use in a new computer (as secondary)


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7 replies to this topic

#1 PapaLongLegs

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Posted 03 June 2010 - 11:39 AM

Hi.

This year, I bought a new computer after my old one became absolutely riddled with viruses (I was planning to update anyway). And my new computer is great, everything I hoped for and at a great price.

However the catch with it's great price is that it's built in C: drive is relatively short changed in this day and age, marked at only 250GB. Now, my old computer had nothing special, a similar 200GB HDD.

I was wondering, is it possible to completely format my OLD hard drive and use it as a secondary disk in the new computer- without the viruses from my old PC getting anywhere near it. These viruses were very very nasty, I had the support forum trying to get it fixed with me but they concluded that I should format and start again as the viruses were so deep into the computer's core. They affected boot sectors etc.

So ideally, Id like to format the old HDD in my OLD rig, so that all viruses are eliminated before it even goes near my new computer- (the old rig is useable to this extent). The old computer has Windows XP installed on the drive I'm after.

My new computer is windows 7- I do not want to format its hard drive, just give myself some extra space with a clean secondary HDD. In summary, I want to get my old HDD to the state of one that's been newly bought in a shop and install that to my new computer.

Many thanks for any responses in advance. Please do let me know if its not worth the hassle and I should just buy a new HDD elsewhere, cheers!

Oh and another thing, my new HDD (main drive) is ATA, whereas I think the old one (which I want as a slave drive) is SATA- will this cause problems?

Edited by PapaLongLegs, 03 June 2010 - 12:09 PM.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 03 June 2010 - 12:30 PM

Assuming that malware was the problem with the drive...and the drive itself functions properly...you can format, "low-level format" using the hard drrive manufacturer's utility, or use an application like Darik's Boot And Nuke Hard Drive Disk Wipe and Data Clearing - http://www.dban.org/ to assure yourself that any malware is kaput.

Your weapon of choice :thumbsup:.

I would be inclined to use the HD manufacturer's utility, since that can also be used to check the functionality of the hard drive...an important step, IMO, before investing any time/effort into anything beyond that.

Louis

#3 PapaLongLegs

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 09:15 AM

Hi

thanks for the reply!

Are you suggesting that I do low-level-format using the manufacturers utility AND THEN using DBAN? Or should the manu. utility be enough?

These were very bad viruses, we never actually got to the bottom of it so imagine it to be the worst you can think of- affecting BIOS and boot sectors etc- what is the safest way to wip this drive?

Edited by PapaLongLegs, 05 June 2010 - 09:19 AM.


#4 Sneakycyber

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 11:43 AM

Use the manufactures utility to test the drive. Then if it passes both the long and short test I would use Dban.

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#5 PapaLongLegs

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 07:58 AM

Okay,

Another question about DBAN, will the autonuke feature be enough to obliterate rootkits and other nasties, or should I configure it with another method? Oh and also, I read somewhere that there are parts of the boot sector that are protected and you have to change their settings in the BIOS in order to wipe them, is this true?

Thanks!

#6 PapaLongLegs

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 07:12 AM

Any thoughts guys?

#7 Venek

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 09:15 AM

Always better to play it safe and just wipe the HD clean. I use the free version of Killdisk for that purpose (www.killdisk.com). Then I do a full format of the HD.

If nothing else, go out and buy a brand-new HD!
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#8 buddy215

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Posted 03 July 2010 - 07:55 AM

Simply reformatting and reinstalling XP will in almost all instances remove the chance of malware that is presently
on the drive to reinfect your computer.
But as others have suggested, using any of the tools such as Darik's Boot and Nuke will overwrite the entire HDD.
That can take many hours on a large HDD. One that overwrites only once would be more than sufficient.

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