Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Overclocking m2n32 sli deluxe


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 soulshard

soulshard

  • Members
  • 146 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California
  • Local time:02:02 AM

Posted 30 May 2010 - 02:25 AM

hi
im looking to get some extra performance out of my computer without having to spend money. i have always been nervous about overclocking because of all the horror stories i hear about blue screens and overheating. but i know my m2n32 sli deluxe has some very stellar overclocking options
my specs are as follows
m2n32 sli deluxe mobo
nvidia geforce evga 8800 gt
amd x2 5400+ dual core 2.8 GHz
3 gigs crucial ballistix ram
680 watt power supply
640 gig hard drive
windows 7 ultimate 32 bit

my graphics card under a full load is usually around high 70s to low 80s in degrees Celsius. my cpu is usually around 50 degrees celsius.

do u think overclocking with this setup is safe and worth it? if so, can i get a detailed outline of how to do it. the main things i want to overclock is my processor and my graphics card.

thanks

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 MrBruce1959

MrBruce1959

    My cat Oreo


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,377 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwich, Connecticut. in the USA
  • Local time:06:02 AM

Posted 31 May 2010 - 12:24 AM

Check this link for some ideas:

http://www.wikihow.com/Overclock-a-PC

Good luck.
Welcome to Bleeping Computer! :welcome:
New Members: Please click here for the Bleeping Computer Forum Board Rules
 
My Career Involves 37 Years as an Electronics Repair Technician, to Which I am Currently Retired From.

I Am Currently Using Windows 10 Home Edition.

As a Volunteer Staff Member of Bleeping Computer, the Help That I Proudly Provide Here To Our BC Forum Board Membership is Free of Charge. :wink:

#3 soulshard

soulshard
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 146 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California
  • Local time:02:02 AM

Posted 31 May 2010 - 02:40 AM

thanks bruce. as i read that i just got more and more afraid i of screwing up. looks like a very complicated and long process, and i know screwing up is pretty easy. so i think im just gona go with the old saying. "better safe than sorry" thanks anyway

#4 MrBruce1959

MrBruce1959

    My cat Oreo


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,377 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwich, Connecticut. in the USA
  • Local time:06:02 AM

Posted 31 May 2010 - 05:47 AM

thanks bruce. as i read that i just got more and more afraid i of screwing up. looks like a very complicated and long process, and i know screwing up is pretty easy. so i think im just gona go with the old saying. "better safe than sorry" thanks anyway


First off you're welcome for my help. :flowers:

Second, over-clocking is pretty much a trial and error thing, you have to take some risks while attempting it.

Below I will give a brief run down on how over-clocking is achieved.

If over-clocking is done right, there is little risk of any real permanent destruction.

In short, you have to start with the default values and work your way up in steps until the OS starts to show signs of instability, then you take one step back wards and leave that setting where it is.

Over-clocking involves raising the timings of the RAM modules and the RAMs Voltage settings, one step up at a time, until the system starts to show signs of becoming unstable, then you step back one notch, to the next lowest set of timings for RAM and one step back wards with the RAMs voltage.

The Processor can be stepped up to the next available clock speed if the BIOS allows it, if for example a 2400 MHz processor defaults at 1500 MHz in the BIOS, you can step it up to 2000 MHz. Rarely does a BIOS step in numbers other than 0500 or 0000, so the next clock speed available in the BIOS might be 2500 MHz. Thats 100 MHz above the rating of the processor, it might clock without error, then again depending on the core, it might become unstable and cause many system crashes. There-fore you would step back to 2000 MHz.

There are settings which increase the core voltage, those settings can be 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 If you over-clock sometimes increasing this voltage allows the clock to be increased with better stability, thus it requires more voltage to handle the increased clock speed. However, increasing it from the default of 1.5 and just jumping to 1.9 can cause rapid over heating of the core, this is a bad practice for one, because the correct way to do it, is to increase this setting to the next available voltage instead, which would be 1.6 in this case, also doing so increases the temperature of the core, and requires a much better cooling system to keep the core temp from raising to a dangerous level, this sometimes requires a cooler system consisting of a water circulation system, commonly called a water-cooler.

Once the temperature is brought down to a safe level again, the voltage can again be increased up to the next available voltage of 1.7 and stability checked again and so on.

Over-clockers do this until they reach a peak to which the system is peaked out to its maxinum and still stable, but almost close to instability.

Over-clocking should not be attempted unless you intend to find sufficient ways of getting the extra heat produced out of the system altogether, in other-words bigger heat sink and more exhaust fans.

I realize your gut feelings are to leave well enough alone, however I figured I would still give you a brief run down of how over-clocking the Processor and RAM through the BIOS can be achieved. :thumbsup:

Edited by MrBruce1959, 31 May 2010 - 06:06 AM.

Welcome to Bleeping Computer! :welcome:
New Members: Please click here for the Bleeping Computer Forum Board Rules
 
My Career Involves 37 Years as an Electronics Repair Technician, to Which I am Currently Retired From.

I Am Currently Using Windows 10 Home Edition.

As a Volunteer Staff Member of Bleeping Computer, the Help That I Proudly Provide Here To Our BC Forum Board Membership is Free of Charge. :wink:




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users