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Lightning detection/radar


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7 replies to this topic

#1 subtropical

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Posted 28 May 2010 - 02:49 PM

Hi!

I live down here in St. Pete and go through the pulling of the plugs many times over the summer months.
I like this place http://www.aprsfl.net/weather/lightning/index.php?site=SV to give me a heads up when the time comes.

What do you use in other parts of the country/world?
:-)

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#2 DeathStalker

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Posted 29 May 2010 - 02:05 PM

A surge protector.

#3 the_patriot11

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 06:34 AM

anti lightning gun. It sits on my roof and shoots lighting before it hits my house, makes a big ZAP and then a BANG. My neighbors are cranky and I normally get the police on my door every thunderstorm for noise complaints, but hey its worth it. Air force has been hounding me for the technology for years. jk, no I just use a good surge protector and high quality power supplies in my computers, and simply turn them off when we get hit by a lightning storm. sometimes dont even turn the TV off, never had anything fry on me.

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#4 MrBruce1959

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 08:54 AM

What do you use in other parts of the country/world?


The best defense against lightening is Earth ground.

To protect your home or electrical appliances from lightening damage, you need to provide a safe shortcut to Earth ground.

Lightening has one path it tends to follow, When a positive charged cloud discharges, it is attracted by a negative charged source, with is either a negative charged cloud, or Earth.

Objects towering high into the sky which are connected to Earth, create a shortcut to the connection to Earth ground, so lightening chooses that path. This includes buildings or trees.

Lightening strikes to buildings or homes can be diverted by placing lightening rods above the homes roof, which are attached to a copper cable properly grounded to a rod placed at least 4' into the ground.

As for electrical appliances, all devices should be properly grounded through the 3rd conductor wire to a properly grounded rod outside the home.
This feature also prevents static build up, which also helps to attract opposite ions.

By the way, one misconception is that lightening travels from cloud to Earth, this is not correct. Lightening actually travels from the Earth up to the cloud. This has been proven by use of viewing film clips taken with high speed film cameras. Since this is the case, a lightening rod located at a higher point above a home will create a safer shortcut for the path to follow.

As for surge protectors, these contain a circuit which is designed to sacrifice its self in the event a spike does travel through it. However the response time is not allows quick enough before the Diodes found inside power supplies and the down-step transformer fry from the over-whelming surge of AC current thrown at them.

It is not the current of lightening that is lethal, it is the heat that is dangerous, lightening has heat that almost equals the Sun's core temp and it is released in a matter of miliseconds.

Just my two cents worth. :thumbsup:

Edited by MrBruce1959, 05 June 2010 - 09:00 AM.

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#5 norohs

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 12:26 PM

I used to live in Florida and the lightning storms were a God send... I fix TV's for a living. :thumbsup:

Seriously, I've seen lots of lightning damage, like surge protectors blown to bits and burned. I've seen houses there all the electrical wire in the house needs to be replaced. I've seen the concrete floor busted up where a speaker wire was run under the carpet and so much more.

I give only one suggestion to my customers - unplug it or loose it.

Back on topic...

You are already doing the most prudent thing to protect your electronics. Use a surge protector for those days where they sneak up on you. They might not stop all the damage, but they frequently reduce the damage. Note that they are called surge protectors, not lightning arrestors.

#6 brooksey!!!

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 12:06 PM

Don't get much in the UK....
I actually have nothing to protect my gear from an electrical storm. I should get on that! My studio could get fried!
Thanks - this has got me thinking (AKA Google shopping!).
GB

#7 the_patriot11

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 04:14 PM

What do you use in other parts of the country/world?



By the way, one misconception is that lightening travels from cloud to Earth, this is not correct. Lightening actually travels from the Earth up to the cloud. This has been proven by use of viewing film clips taken with high speed film cameras. Since this is the case, a lightening rod located at a higher point above a home will create a safer shortcut for the path to follow.


well, partially not correct, (if im recalling my high school science right) Lightning actually travels both ways, the current goes down, then arcs back up. You only see the arc back up, you cant see the current going down. my memorys faulty, but it seems to me the current going down isnt as powerful as the one going up.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#8 Layback Bear

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 09:23 AM

I never new there are so many kinds of lightning, check this site out.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightnin. I use two surge protectors in series. I hope they never get tested.




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