Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

getting new laptop


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 ryan_w_quick

ryan_w_quick

  • Members
  • 488 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:12:35 AM

Posted 27 May 2010 - 04:25 PM

I'm looking to get a new laptop soon. It is going to have some form of windows 7. I would realy like to get a solid state drive to improve performance.

I have heard a lot of issues about solid state drives having "short life" issues. most of the articles and message boards that i have seen talk about the drive wearing out after many writes to the same cells.

but i have also heard that windows 7 has some innovations to help manage this wearing down. and I don't know if ssds have somehow improved.

Is there any educated opinions or articles anyone could share as far as getting a solid state drive or an old fashioned drive in my new laptop?

thank you
"To do less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." Steve Prefontaine

"The things you own end up owning you." Tyler Durden

"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same god who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." Galileo

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,281 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:11:35 PM

Posted 27 May 2010 - 06:41 PM

I don't have any expertise on this or anything else...but I remember when burners first came out.

They cost a lot and they were plagued by the learning curve that follows all new technology, IMO.

My opinion is that is where SSDs are today and I see no reason to invest in one or more...until those two things have changed to the point where there are clear advantages to everyone adapting to the new technology...just as there is now for SATA over PATA hard drives.

I get kind of annoyed when I see "performance" mentioned when it comes to hard drives...I guess I have never seen where that is an issue for a typical system. For enthusiasts, yes...for those who like to tinker, yes...for the average user...nonissue, IMO.

Gamers are in a special world of wants when it comes to systems...all the rest of us merely benefit from technology developed as the result of their orientation.

Last comment...I really don't see how anyone can think of buying a laptop...if gaming/performance/etc. is the primary thrust. Laptops are toys/tools that are made to become obsolete within 6 months (IMO) and they are not made with the capability of upgrading a system as technology improves and becomes readily available. If one eliminates the portability factor...a laptop becomes nothing but a toy, just as my mp3 player, headphones, etc. are.

I can be wrong :thumbsup:.

Louis

#3 ReviverSoft

ReviverSoft

    Happy to help!


  • Members
  • 1,552 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Somewhere on this planet...
  • Local time:09:35 PM

Posted 27 May 2010 - 09:07 PM

getting a solid state drive or an old fashioned drive in my new laptop?


But wait, what about hybrid drives? :thumbsup:

Anyway, getting back to current options, the following links should help:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/134185/soli...in_laptops.html

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/913...orth_the_money_

http://www.technewsworld.com/rsstory/66151...?wlc=1275012396
ReviverSoft - Happy to help!

#4 ryan_w_quick

ryan_w_quick
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 488 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:12:35 AM

Posted 29 May 2010 - 06:22 PM

thank you for the links. i'm not sure about the hybrid drives, because on the websites that allow you to customize your pc and see how much it costs, i havn't seen those as an option in the pcs that ive looke at.

at hamlouis,

I am planning on getting a small and ultra portable laptop or netbook. I've heard that with a lot of systems, a slow hard drive can often be a bottle neck. also, any files or operating systems on the ssd will load faster. I open a lot of large pdfs and cad and office files. so i guess when i used the word "performance" i probably miss spoke. I probably should have said I'm looking for "convenience".

It would be nice to have high speed ssd so that i could start getting to work as soon as i turn my laptop on, or when i double click a large file. However, i do want this laptop to function for a while. I've heard some stories about them slowing down the more they are used, and eventually dieing. Some of the stories ive heard have described the drives dieing rather quickly. I simply don't want to have to replace a hard drive in a year or 2. i know an hdd and die too, but at least i know the risks with a regular hard drive. I find them acceptable, as do most people with computers. I just need to know more about these ssds before i pay extra to get one but in my machine.
"To do less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." Steve Prefontaine

"The things you own end up owning you." Tyler Durden

"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same god who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." Galileo

#5 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,281 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:11:35 PM

Posted 30 May 2010 - 09:15 AM

Understood :thumbsup:.

I can't tell you anything about SSDs, other than my opinions.

I do know that, if I wanted to focus on a system that responds quickly...the hard drive would not be my priority. I believe that RAM and CPU are more important features.

I have no more ability to predict the future than anyone else out there with opinions...but I believe that I can easily recognize trends in certain areas. I've tried to share those with you...not as an "expert" of any sort, but as a computer user over a period of years.

I myself have never seen anything indicating that a hard drive is the bottleneck of a system, in spite of the fact that some act as if it is (those promoting RAID configurations).

I could be wrong :flowers:.

Louis

#6 ReviverSoft

ReviverSoft

    Happy to help!


  • Members
  • 1,552 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Somewhere on this planet...
  • Local time:09:35 PM

Posted 30 May 2010 - 08:54 PM

It would be nice to have high speed ssd so that i could start getting to work as soon as i turn my laptop on, or when i double click a large file. However, i do want this laptop to function for a while. I just need to know more about these ssds before i pay extra to get one but in my machine.


Well, SSDs haven't really matured enough, to prove itself as a strong alternative to HDDs and offer the reliability you seek on a long term basis.

Cons

Questionable life expectancy of SSD: “NAND Flash, the underlying technology of today's majority SSD products, has write wear-out limitations, with embedded processors, software and over provisioning of capacity, among other things,” said Zhu. SSD manufactures have addressed this limitation, however, this inevitably adds another link in the chain of the overall reliability of SSD-based systems that must be rigorously tested and certified. “The lack of standard measurement of the life expectancy of SSD is a major drawback,” Zhu warns.

SSD technology is nascent: HP and other industry leaders including Intel and Sun do not predict that SSD will replace hard drives in the enterprise. “Like any new technology, SSD is still at the testing stages so there are a number of factors and challenges that need to be addressed before it matures in the enterprise space,” said Zhu.

Not ideal for all: “SSD is not recommended for everyone, it is ideally suited for businesses that require high-performance, intensive I/O operations; are power sensitive; and/or are in a rugged environment,” said Zhu. HP expects SSD to be used as a premium performance tier in well balanced storage deployments.

More Expensive:
“SSDs are a bit more expensive, have less capacity and a finite number of write cycles when compared to traditional spinning drives, but those drawbacks are quickly disappearing,” explains Charles Kaplan, chief technology strategist at Mazu Networks, now part of Riverbed, a wide area network (WAN) optimization solutions provider.



That said, you can always invest in a SSD, at the right time. :thumbsup:

Edited by ReviverSoft, 30 May 2010 - 08:54 PM.

ReviverSoft - Happy to help!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users