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DHCP client turns off


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#1 SysTech Guy

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 09:29 AM

Does anyone know how to troubleshoot a problem where the DHCP client will shut off upon reboot?

I have a customer who after a reboot, they will loose Internet connection. I had to remote in to troubleshoot, but I couldn't because the client had no network connectivity. Over the phone, I had the client check the DHCP client in the 'services' list. I had her start it and I was then able to remote in.

I set the DHCP client to Automatic in 'Services'.

However, I received a call saying that the DHCP client was off again. I had her start it again and she was able to get to the Network.

What would cause the DHCP client to shut off like that? None of the other computers in the client's office is having this issue.

EDIT: Moved from XP to Am I Infected forum ~ Hamluis.

Edited by hamluis, 02 June 2010 - 01:37 PM.


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#2 webgeekkc

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 12:53 PM

I just had to clean a trojan off of a users computer that kept resetting the DNS server address. Malwarebytes cleaned it up. It may be worth a try in this case.

Edited by hamluis, 02 June 2010 - 01:37 PM.


#3 SysTech Guy

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 05:43 PM

Did a Malware Bytes scan. No issues were found.

#4 caperdog

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 07:37 PM

is ipsec also set to automatic ?

#5 SysTech Guy

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 11:14 AM

Turned out to be a TDSS rootkit

Used the TDSS Killer utility

Fixed.

#6 boopme

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 03:16 PM

Now you should Create a New Restore Point to prevent possible reinfection from an old one. Some of the malware you picked up could have been backed up, renamed and saved in System Restore. Since this is a protected directory your tools cannot access to delete these files, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. Setting a new restore point AFTER cleaning your system will help prevent this and enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state.

The easiest and safest way to do this is:
  • Go to Start > Programs > Accessories > System Tools and click "System Restore".
  • Choose the radio button marked "Create a Restore Point" on the first screen then click "Next". Give the R.P. a name, then click "Create". The new point will be stamped with the current date and time. Keep a log of this so you can find it easily should you need to use System Restore.
  • Then use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recently created Restore Point.
  • Go to Start > Run and type: Cleanmgr
  • Click "Ok". Disk Cleanup will scan your files for several minutes, then open.
  • Click the "More Options" tab, then click the "Clean up" button under System Restore.
  • Click Ok. You will be prompted with "Are you sure you want to delete all but the most recent restore point?"
  • Click Yes, then click Ok.
  • Click Yes again when prompted with "Are you sure you want to perform these actions?"
  • Disk Cleanup will remove the files and close automatically.
Vista and Windows 7 users can refer to these links: Create a New Restore Point in Vista or Windows 7 and Disk Cleanup in Vista.
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