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I Think I Fried My Computer


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#1 Trind

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 12:54 AM

Hi, this is my first post. Thanks for taking the time to read my disaster and thank you for helping any way that you can.

I have a three year old Hewlett Packard Pavilion Media Center m8300f PC. I decided to upgrade the power supply to a Zumax X3 Series ZU-650W and install a MSI N9500GT MDIG/D2. I installed the card no problem, but I was having difficulty with getting the computer to recognize the CD ROM drive. The factory power supply does not have enough SATA power connectors to power both hard drives and the CD ROM drive, so HP had put a converter on the CD drive to convert from SATA to peripheral. I remembered this and, without thinking, attempted to plug the peripheral connector into the converter that was attached to the CD drive, all while the computer was turned on. I mis-aligned the peripheral connectors and connected one of the pins to the wrong female connector. The computer instantly turned off. The power button on the front of the case didn't work and the I/O switch on the power supply didn't work, but I recalled that disconnecting the power cable from the power supply would reset it in the event of a surge. I did so and it powered back on, automatically checked the discs for faults and continued booting up. Everything was fine, even my CD drive.

I shut the computer down and let it sit for a few hours because I had to do something elsewhere. When I came back, the computer would not boot. The BIOS do not post and there is no image displayed on my monitor. I have tried both the new video card and the on-board video and both do not work. I systematically disconnected every disc drive and card. I have switched back to the old power supply and tried the same method of diagnostics. I tried resetting the BIOS and the CMOS using the jumper switches on the motherboard. I have taken off all four sticks of RAM and tried each of them in each of the RAM slots. The only time that the motherboard BIOS beeps a code, or beeps at all, is when no RAM is installed. I've attempted to press F10 to reach the BIOS but to no avail. All the fans work, so the motherboard gets power. I checked the tops of the capacitors and they are not leaking nor swollen. Occasionally during testing the computer would start up when I plugged in the power cord or flipped the I/O switch, without me pressing the power button on the front of the case.

I hope that helps you help me. Thanks again.

Edited by Trind, 18 May 2010 - 12:59 AM.


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#2 MrBruce1959

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 11:32 AM

Hello trind and Welcome to Bleepingcomputer!

I realize you have a sad situation here and have been waiting for someone to reply with some answers or solutions.

First be patient, sometimes it takes a little bit of time for people to think through some possible solutions for you to try to determine if your dealing with a piece of hardware that is not fixable at a reasonable cost.

So hang in there.

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#3 westom

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 06:21 PM

I decided to upgrade the power supply to a Zumax X3 Series ZU-650W and install a MSI N9500GT MDIG/D2. I installed the card no problem, but I was having difficulty with getting the computer to recognize the CD ROM drive. The factory power supply does not have enough SATA power connectors to power both hard drives and the CD ROM drive, so HP had put a converter on the CD drive to convert from SATA to peripheral.

First, many foolishly replace that power supply. For example, an HP supply rated for 350 watts is the same or more powerful than a supply sold by third parties at 500 watts. No, the third party did not lie. They just used different numbers to report a bigger number - so the naive computer assemblers will think the HP supply is smaller.

Second, disconnecting all those thing have nothing to do with your symptoms. May have created even more problems.

Third, a power supply controller has a lock out feature that has nothing to do with surges. You apparently activated that safety feature by moving wires without disconnecting the power cord from the wall. A power off with the power cord still connected to a receptacle means do not disconnect or install anything.

Now a possible failure: nothing works in a computer - not even the CPU - until the power supply system first gives the OK. One reason your system would not start previously - a safety lockout in the controller triggered. Your reset that safety lockout by removing the power cord for one to two seconds.

For some new reason, that power 'system' is not starting the machine. Nobody can say anything more without numbers from a multimeter. Again, disconnecting things can only exponentially complicate the problem - if it has not already. The meter used without disconnecting anything means those with knowledge can, first, tell you what you have. And later report a solution. Multimeters sold in most any store that sells hammers - even in Kmart or in Walmart for $18.

Finally, never install or disconnect anything if connected to the wall receptacle. Unfortunately, what you did should (but not always) cause hardware damage.

Edited by westom, 18 May 2010 - 06:24 PM.


#4 Sneakycyber

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 07:28 PM

Well there is a slim chance the motherboard is ok if you can get it to POST at all is a good sign. If it post without the memory installed I would try different memory first. There is a chance that you damaged more then one component. When the computer post are you getting on screen diagnostics or just a post beep? Does this occur with the new PSU and video card installed or is this the old PSU with only the motherboard, cpu and memory installed with on board graphics.
Chad Mockensturm 
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