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Computer processes too much?


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#1 alexamasan

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 10:48 AM

Several times a day, the processing light on my laptop would just flash up randomly as if it's really busy doing something. While this is happening, sometimes I can still click on other windows that are already open, sometimes the cursor turns into the hour glass-like icon, and sometimes the computer completely freezes and I can't even move the cursor at all. I can't open up new programs while this is happening. This can last from less than a minute to up to around 5 minutes until it somehow finishes whatever it was doing and goes back to normal and any programs I may have tried to open while it was "processing" will now open up.

I don't think it's any kind of malicious programs on my computer because this is a problem I've had ever since I first got the computer. The laptop's operating system was originally windows vista, but I reformatted the computer and did a clean install when I upgraded to windows 7 and I still have the problem (thought for sure that was gonna work). I run virus and spyware scans often and I defrag and clean the registry on the computer regularly. I'm just starting to think it's a hardware problem maybe. What do you guys think? Can you think of anything else I should do?

Edited by alexamasan, 02 May 2010 - 12:05 PM.


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#2 computerxpds

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 11:01 AM

Hi Alexamasan And :huh: to bleepingcomputer. :huh:

First off what are your system specs?

Now 2nd I saw that you said you use a registry cleaner: Here is bleepingcomputer's view on registry cleaners:

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

• Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.

• Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

• Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.

• Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.

• The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.


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#3 alexamasan

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 11:37 AM

------------------
System Information
------------------
Time of this report: 5/2/2010, 12:34:50
Machine name: ALEX-PC
Operating System: Windows 7 Enterprise 32-bit (6.1, Build 7600) (7600.win7_gdr.100226-1909)
Language: English (Regional Setting: English)
System Manufacturer: Gateway
System Model: M-6850FX
BIOS: BIOS Version 89.22
Processor: Intel® Core™2 Duo CPU T8300 @ 2.40GHz (2 CPUs), ~2.4GHz
Memory: 3072MB RAM
Available OS Memory: 3070MB RAM
Page File: 1393MB used, 4745MB available
Windows Dir: C:\Windows
DirectX Version: DirectX 11
DX Setup Parameters: Not found
User DPI Setting: Using System DPI
System DPI Setting: 96 DPI (100 percent)
DWM DPI Scaling: Disabled
DxDiag Version: 6.01.7600.16385 32bit Unicode

However though, I've been having this problem long before I've started using a registry cleaner. However, I will take your advice, but I don't think the cause is due to the registry cleaner.

#4 computerxpds

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 11:46 AM

ok there are many things that could cause this one is windows update another is anti virus software doing a background scan also depending on what programs are running in the back ground can effect performance and have this happen.

What if any anti virus do you use?

:huh:

Edited by computerxpds, 02 May 2010 - 11:47 AM.

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#5 alexamasan

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 11:56 AM

ok there are many things that could cause this one is windows update another is anti virus software doing a background scan also depending on what programs are running in the back ground can effect performance and have this happen.

What if any anti virus do you use?

:huh:


Well, I had this problem back when the only virus scanner I had was windows defender, but they may contribute to the problem somehow. The software I currently have is AVG, Spybot search and destroy, adaware, and windows defender.

I really appreciate you helping me by the way :huh:

I also, I want to add that this event happens several times a day. I should add that in the original post.

Edited by alexamasan, 02 May 2010 - 11:58 AM.


#6 Layback Bear

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 09:03 PM

If AVG is active the rest should be on demand only. Running more that one active anti any thing at the same time can cause all kinds of problems.

#7 keyboardNinja

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Posted 07 May 2010 - 08:15 PM

The primary concern with using more than one anti-virus program is due to conflicts that can arise when both are running in real-time mode simultaneously. Anti-virus software components insert themselves into the operating systems core and using more than one can cause instability, crash your computer, slow performance and waste system resources. When actively running in the background while connected to the Internet, they both may try to update their definition databases at the same time. As the programs compete for resources required to download the necessary files this often can result in sluggish system performance or unresponsive behavior.

Each anti-virus will often interpret the activity of the other as a virus and there is a greater chance of them alerting you to a "False Positive". If one finds a virus and then the other also finds the same virus, both programs will be competing over exclusive rights on dealing with that virus. Each anti-virus will attempt to remove the offending file and quarantine it. If one finds and quarantines the file before the other one does, then you encounter the problem of both wanting to scan each other's zipped or archived files and each reporting the other's quarantined contents. This can lead to a repetitive cycle of endless alerts that continually warn you that a virus has been found when that is not the case.

Anti-virus scanners use virus definitions to check for viruses and these can include a fragment of the virus code which may be recognised by other anti-virus programs as the virus itself. Because of this, most anti-virus programs encrypt their definitions so that they do not trigger a false alarm when scanned by other security programs. However, some anti-virus vendors do not encrypt their definitions and will trigger false alarms if used while another resident anti-virus program is active.

Further, dual installation is not always possible because some anti-virus programs will detect the presence of others and may insist they be removed prior to installation. To avoid these problems, use only one anti-virus solution. Deciding which one to remove is your choice. Be aware that you may lose your subscription to that anti-virus program's virus definitions once you uninstall that software.

Most anti-virus vendors recommend that you install and run only one anti-virus program at a time:
Symantec's statement.
Avast's statement.
AVG's statement.
Dell Support advises the same for their systems.

In contrast, using more than one anti-spyware running in real-time mode simultaneously increases your protection coverage without causing the same kind of conflicts or affecting the stability of your system as what can occur when using more than one anti-virus. Even if your anti-spyware programs are not running in real-time, the overlap of protection from using different signature databases will aid in detection and removal of more threats when scanning your system for malware.

No single product is 100% foolproof and can detect and remove all threats at any given time. The security community is in a constant state of change as new malware infections appear. Each vendor has its own definition of what constitutes spyware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another. Thus, a multi-layered defense using several anti-spyware products (including an effective firewall) to supplement your anti-virus provides the most complete protection.

As a general rule, using more than one anti-spyware program like Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware, SuperAntispyware, Spybot S&D, Ad-Aware, etc will not conflict with each other or your anti-virus if using only one of them for real time protection and others as stand-alone scanners. In fact, doing so increases your protection coverage without causing the same kind of conflicts or affecting the stability of your system that can occur when using more than one anti-virus. The overlap of protection from using different signature databases will aid in detection and removal of more threats when scanning your system for malware. However, if using all their real-time resident shields (TeaTimer, Ad-Watch, MBAM Protection Module, Spyware Terminator Shields, etc) together at the same time, there can be conflicts when each application tries to compete for resources and exclusive rights to perform an action. Additionally, competing tools may even provide redundant alerts which can be annoying and/or confusing.

However, you can over do it with resource heavy programs that will slow down you system performance. Sometimes you just have to experiment to get the right combo for your particular system as there is no universal solution that works for everyone.


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