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Unknown infection


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#1 Kabeeny

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Posted 28 April 2010 - 10:02 AM

Hi, thanks for taking the time to review my situation.

Recently, my World of Warcraft account was hacked. I reported it to the Game Masters and after a couple days they were able to restore my account to it's full glory. That day, I went through the tedium of laying everything out like I had it and went to bed. The next morning I awoke to find the account had been compromised again and everything that had just been restored was again missing.

After the first problem, I ran Trend Micro's Anti-virus and was unable to detect anything on my computer. I also ran Ad-aware and Spybot and removed all the spyware that those programs found (all of it was low-risk). Unsatisfied, and sure that there was more to the problem, I went to Webroot and ran their virus scanner. There, I found a virus called Mal/Generic-A. I uninstalled Trend Micro and purchased Webroot's Anti-Virus and removed (quarantined) the virus along with some other low-threat items it detected.

I then tried to track where I might have picked up the virus, by locating the file, finding the date it was created and looking through my browser history (Firefox). It seems this virus had been on my machine since the middle of November and I picked it up while looking around for old episodes of one of my favorite TV shows. I was leary, to say the least. It seemed unlikely that this thing would be on my computer that long and only now did I have a problem; not to mention the fact that it really wasn't a World of Warcraft-related site I seemed to get it from.

In any case, a couple days had passed and my account had been restored. Feeling mildly reassured that my computer was now clean, I logged back in to my World of Warcraft account only to have it stolen again that night while I was asleep.

I'm 90% sure that my log-in information was stolen when i logged into the Account Management page at Battle-Net, and not when I logged into my game application. So, I'm worried that there may be something dormant on my machine that is only active when I visit the Battle-Net login screen. I'm also concerned that they've gotten into my Hotmail account and fear for my other online account's security.

Please help. I've used HJT before. If you want a log posted I'm happy to do that, I just didn't want to post it here if I wasn't supposed to.

Thanks again for your help.

Edited by Orange Blossom, 28 April 2010 - 09:09 PM.
Move to AII as no logs posted. ~ OB


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 07:20 AM

Please download TFC (Temp File Cleaner) by Old Timer and save it to your desktop.
alternate download link
  • Save any unsaved work. TFC will close ALL open programs including your browser!
  • Double-click on TFC.exe to run it. If you are using Vista, right-click on the file and choose Run As Administrator.
  • Click the Start button to begin the cleaning process and let it run uninterrupted to completion.
  • TFC will clear out all temp folders for all user accounts (temp, IE temp, Java, FF, Opera, Chrome, Safari), including Administrator, All Users, LocalService, NetworkService, and any other accounts in the user folder.
  • Important! If TFC prompts you to reboot, please do so immediately. If not prompted, manually reboot the machine anyway to ensure a complete clean.
Note: It is normal for the computer to be slow to boot after running TFC cleaner the first time.

Please download Malwarebytes Anti-Malware (v1.45) and save it to your desktop.Download Link 1
Download Link 2
MBAM may "make changes to your registry" as part of its disinfection routine. If using other security programs that detect registry changes (ie Spybot's Teatimer), they may interfere or alert you. Temporarily disable such programs or permit them to allow the changes.
  • Make sure you are connected to the Internet.
  • Double-click on mbam-setup.exe to install the application.
    For instructions with screenshots, please refer to the How to use Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware Guide.
  • When the installation begins, follow the prompts and do not make any changes to default settings.
  • When installation has finished, make sure you leave both of these checked:
    • Update Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
    • Launch Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
  • Then click Finish.
MBAM will automatically start and you will be asked to update the program before performing a scan.
  • If an update is found, the program will automatically update itself. Press the OK button to close that box and continue.
  • If you encounter any problems while downloading the definition updates, manually download them from here and just double-click on mbam-rules.exe to install.
On the Scanner tab:
  • Make sure the "Perform Quick Scan" option is selected.
  • Then click on the Scan button.
  • If asked to select the drives to scan, leave all the drives selected and click on the Start Scan button.
  • The scan will begin and "Scan in progress" will show at the top. It may take some time to complete so please be patient.
  • When the scan is finished, a message box will say "The scan completed successfully. Click 'Show Results' to display all objects found".
  • Click OK to close the message box and continue with the removal process.
Back at the main Scanner screen:
  • Click on the Show Results button to see a list of any malware that was found.
  • Make sure that everything is checked, and click Remove Selected.
  • When removal is completed, a log report will open in Notepad.
  • The log is automatically saved and can be viewed by clicking the Logs tab in MBAM.
  • Copy and paste the contents of that report in your next reply. Be sure to post the complete log to include the top portion which shows MBAM's database version and your operating system.
  • Exit MBAM when done.
Note: If MBAM encounters a file that is difficult to remove, you will be asked to reboot your computer so MBAM can proceed with the disinfection process. If asked to restart the computer, please do so immediately. Failure to reboot normally (not into safe mode) will prevent MBAM from removing all the malware.IMPORTANT NOTE: Gaming sites are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. They can lead to other sites containing malware which you can inadvertently download without knowledge. Users visiting such sites may encounter innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install viruses, Trojans and spyware. Ads are a target for hackers because they offer a stealthy way to distribute malware to a wide range of Internet users. For these reasons gaming sites can put you at risk to fraud, phishing and theft of personal data. Even if the gaming site is a clean site, there is always the potential of some type of malware making its way there and then onto your system. In some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to your system that it cannot be successfully cleaned or repaired. In those cases, recovery is not possible and the only option is to reformat/reinstall the OS.

...Microsoft Security has issued a research report where it notifies that virus creators are continuously assaulting online video game players...a malicious family of software programs are seeking out popular online computer games such as World of Warcraft, Maple Story, Lineage and several others. According to Microsoft’s seventh Security Intelligence Report, cybercrooks use computer worm parasites for stealing confidential personal information from local computer users through online games, unsecured file sharing and removable disk drives...The most dangerous and prevalent malware involve Taterf and Conficker worms which have infected millions of computer systems worldwide...

Malware Makers Target Online Games to Spread Worms

Microsoft warned video game developers...that their PC games are now a target for criminals...Popular massively multiplayer online games, such as World of Warcraft, have created a market for valuable game identities...Using malware or software designed to infiltrate a computer system, hackers steal account information...

Microsoft warns game developers of cyber thieves

...Gaming sites are becoming a growth area for malware and other security threats. The newer threats are sophisticated and are designed to draw in unsuspecting users...

Game Sites Next Big Malware Target?

The design of online game architecture creates an open door for hackers...hackers and malware hoodlums go where the pickings are easy -- where the crowds gather. Thus, Internet security experts warn game players that they face a greater risk of attack playing games online because few protections exist....traditional firewall and antimalware software applications can't see any intrusions. Game players have no defenses...Online gaming sites are a major distribution vehicle for malware....

MMO Security: Are Players Getting Played?

...Moral of the story?
1. Do not allow online games
2. Block ports used by online games
3. Block sites related to these online games
4. Educate your users...

online game + online trade = Trojan Spy

Security researchers...poked around in World of Warcraft and other online games, finding vulnerabilities and exploiting the system using online bots and rootkit-like techniques to evade detection...Some Trojan Web sites have done what they can do to collect gamers' authentication information so they can loot their characters (and) accounts.

Real Flaws in Virtual Worlds: Exploiting Online Games

...a very significant release for Gamers everywhere with the addition of a variety of password stealers directly targeting Online games. The main targets are mostly based in Eastern Asia (Lineage Online, Legend Of Mir, ZT Online just to name a few), but World of Warcraft and Valve’s Steam client are high on the hit-list too...

Taterf – all your drives are belong to me!

Using gaming sites is almost a guaranteed way to get yourself infected!!
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#3 Kabeeny

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 11:37 PM

I think I followed all directions to the letter....it came up with 4 registry keys that were infected. Could those be the problem (I would have thought I was looking for an executable)?

It might be possible my machine is clean already. I've only found the one virus though, but as I said earlier, it didn't seem to be a likely candidate.

Should I try anything else?

The Log follows:

Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware 1.46
www.malwarebytes.org

Database version: 4056

Windows 6.0.6002 Service Pack 2
Internet Explorer 8.0.6001.18904

4/30/2010 9:31:37 PM
mbam-log-2010-04-30 (21-31-37).txt

Scan type: Quick scan
Objects scanned: 118369
Time elapsed: 3 minute(s), 46 second(s)

Memory Processes Infected: 0
Memory Modules Infected: 0
Registry Keys Infected: 4
Registry Values Infected: 0
Registry Data Items Infected: 0
Folders Infected: 0
Files Infected: 0

Memory Processes Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Memory Modules Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Keys Infected:
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\hotbarweather.weathercontroller (Adware.Softomate) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\hotbarweather.weathercontroller.1 (Adware.Softomate) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Ext\Stats\{90b8b761-df2b-48ac-bbe0-bcc03a819b3b} (Adware.Zango) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Ext\Settings\{90b8b761-df2b-48ac-bbe0-bcc03a819b3b} (Adware.Zango) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.

Registry Values Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Data Items Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Folders Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Files Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

#4 quietman7

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 05:33 AM

Please perform a scan with Kaspersky Online Virus Scanner.
-- Requires free Java Runtime Environment (JRE) to be installed before scanning for malware as ActiveX is no longer being used.
-- This scan will not remove any detected file threats but it will show where they are located so they can be cleaned with other tools.
  • Vista users need to right-click the IE or FF Start Menu or Quick Launch Bar icons and Run As Administrator from the context menu.
  • Read the "Advantages - Requirements and Limitations" then press the Posted Image... button.
  • You will be prompted to install an application from Kaspersky. Click the Run button. It will start downloading and installing the scanner and virus definitions.
  • When the downloads have finished, you should see 'Database is updated. Ready to scan'. Click on the Posted Image... button.
  • Make sure these boxes are checked. By default, they should be. If not, please check them and click on the Posted Image... button afterwards:
    • Detect malicious programs of the following categories:
      Viruses, Worms, Trojan Horses, Rootkits
      Spyware, Adware, Dialers and other potentially dangerous programs
    • Scan compound files (doesn't apply to the File scan area):
      Archives
      Mail databases
  • Click on My Computer under the Scan section. OK any warnings from your protection programs.
  • The scan will take a while so be patient and do NOT use the computer while the scan is running. Keep all other programs and windows closed.
  • Once the scan is complete (the 'status' will show complete), click on View Scan Report and any infected objects will be shown.
  • Click on Save Report As... and change the Files of type to Text file (.txt)
  • Name the file KAVScan_ddmmyy (day, month, year) before clicking on the Save button and save it to your Desktop.
  • Copy and paste (Ctrl+C) the saved scan results from that file in your next reply.
-- Note: Some online scanners will detect existing anti-virus software and refuse to cooperate. You may have to disable the real-time protection components of your existing anti-virus and try running the scan again. If you do this, remember to turn them back on after you are finished.
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#5 Kabeeny

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 06:44 PM

Ok. Not sure what it found in the mIRC that tossed-up a red-flag, but it's a program I rarely use so I can delete it if needed.

Here's the KAV Scan Report:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KASPERSKY ONLINE SCANNER 7.0: scan report
Saturday, May 1, 2010
Operating system: Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition, 32-bit Service Pack 2 (build 6002)
Kaspersky Online Scanner version: 7.0.26.13
Last database update: Saturday, May 01, 2010 08:28:14
Records in database: 4021421
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Scan settings:
scan using the following database: extended
Scan archives: yes
Scan e-mail databases: yes

Scan area - My Computer:
C:\
D:\

Scan statistics:
Objects scanned: 140105
Threats found: 1
Infected objects found: 2
Suspicious objects found: 0
Scan duration: 01:18:30


File name / Threat / Threats count
C:\Program Files\mIRC\mirc.exe Infected: not-a-virus:Client-IRC.Win32.mIRC.g 1
C:\Users\Chris\Downloads\mirc635.exe Infected: not-a-virus:Client-IRC.Win32.mIRC.g 1

Selected area has been scanned.

Edited by Kabeeny, 01 May 2010 - 06:45 PM.


#6 quietman7

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 10:50 PM

Please read ThreatExpert's awareness of the file "not-a-virus:Client-IRC.Win32.mIRC" and the Kaspersky forum discussion of mIRC not-a-virus:Client-IRC.Win32.mIRC.As the scan indicates, the file is not-a-virus. However, some programs may at times be detected by anti-virus and anti-malware scanners as a "Risk Tool", "Hacking Tool", "Potentially Unwanted Program", or even "Malware" (virus/trojan) when that is not the case.

Such programs have legitimate uses in contexts where an authorized user or administrator has knowingly installed it. When flagged by an anti-virus or security scanner, it's because the program includes features, behavior or files that appear suspicious or which can potentially be used for malicious purposes. These detections do not necessarily mean the file is malware or a bad program. It means it has the potential for being misused by others. Anti-virus scanners cannot distinguish between "good" and "malicious" use of such programs, therefore they may alert you or even automatically remove them. If you installed or recognize the program, then you can ignore the detection. If not, then it can be removed.
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#7 Kabeeny

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 11:43 PM

Thanks for the info. I'm pretty sure the mIRC app wasn't used maliciously, however, as I haven't even launched the app in several months. In fact, I'll just go ahead and uninstall it anyway.

Well, we've cleaned a lot of stuff off my computer in terms of infected registry keys, temp files and cookies. There was still only the one virus that I picked-off with Webroot's AV before posting the thread here. Are there any other steps I can take to ferret-out vulnerabilities? Although we didn't seem to find anything solid, I'm sure we've probably done a fair bit of interfering with their ability to keep hacking my accounts.

I recovered my Hotmail account now (or, at least I'm logged into it again...for now) and my Authenticator for the game application arrived in the mail today. I'll change my email address and affix the authenticator to my WoW account. With this, combined with everything we've done here, my confidence is a little higher. Only time will tell, I guess.

Please let me know if there's anything else I should do, and thanks so very much for your help this far. I LOVE the TFC and MBAM progs!

#8 quietman7

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 06:23 AM

No single product is 100% foolproof and can prevent, detect and remove all threats at any given time. The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear. Each vendor has its own definition of what constitutes malware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another. Thus, a multi-layered defense using several anti-spyware products (including an effective firewall) to supplement your anti-virus combined with common sense and safe surfing habits provides the most complete protection.

Cookies are text string messages given to a Web browser by a Web server. Whenever you visit a web page or navigate different pages with your browser, the web site generates a unique ID number which your browser stores in a text (cookie) file that is sent back to the server each time the browser requests a page from that server. Cookies allow third-party providers such as ad serving networks, spyware or adware providers to track personal information. The main purpose of cookies is to identify users and prepare customized Web pages for them but not all websites use them.
  • Persistent cookies have expiration dates set by the Web server when it passes the cookie and are stored on a user's hard drive until they expire or are deleted. These types of cookies are used to store information between visits to a site and collect identifying information about the user such as surfing behavior or preferences for a specific web site.
  • Session (transient) cookies are not saved to the hard drive, do not collect any information and have no set expiration date. They are used to temporarily hold information in the form of a session identification stored in memory as you browse web pages. These types of cookies are cached only while a user is visiting the Web server issuing the session cookie and are deleted from the cache when the user closes the session.
The type of persistent cookie that is a cause for some concern are "tracking cookies" because they can be considered a privacy risk. These types of cookies are used to track your Web browsing habits (your movement from site to site). Ad companies use them to record your activity on all sites where they have placed ads. They can keep count of how many times you visited a web page, store your username and password so you don't have to log in and retain your custom settings. When you visit one of these sites, a cookie is placed on your computer. Each time you visit another site that hosts one of their ads, that same cookie is read, and soon they have assembled a list of which of their sites you have visited and which of their ads that you have clicked on. Cookies are used all over the Internet and advertisement companies often plant them whenever your browser loads one of their banners.

Cookies are NOT a "threat". As text files they cannot be executed to cause any damage. Cookies do not cause any pop ups or install malware and they cannot erase or read information from a computer.

Cookies cannot be used to run code (run programs) or to deliver viruses to your computer.

MS Article ID: 60971 - Description of Cookies

To learn more about Cookies, please refer to:As long as you surf the Internet, you are going to get cookies and some of your security programs will flag them for removal. However, you can minimize the number of them which are stored on your computer by referring to:
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