Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Can a Kink in your Ethernet Cord Reduce Connection Speed?


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 CHansohn

CHansohn

  • Members
  • 188 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Local time:06:03 AM

Posted 18 April 2010 - 05:04 PM

Pretty much the title is the whole question. I heard from my Boss that a kink in your ethernet cord can reduce connection speed by up to 50% or more. If that is true then does that mean that once your cord is kinked your cord needs to be replaced in order to regain speed?

CPU = Intel i7 950
Motherboard = Asus P6X58D
RAM = Corsair XMS3 DDR3 6X 2GB
Power Supply = Corsair AX1200W
Graphics Card = GTX 580 2-way SLI


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 CaveDweller2

CaveDweller2

  • Members
  • 2,629 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:03 AM

Posted 18 April 2010 - 06:26 PM

Umm its not a hose so kinking it isn't going to reduce the flow of electricity. Now you can damage the wires inside and the wires may become buggy that might be what he is talking about. If you kinked the cord then ran over it with a chair, yeah that cord needs replaced.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#3 CHansohn

CHansohn
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 188 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Local time:06:03 AM

Posted 18 April 2010 - 07:09 PM

That's what I figured. if you bent it back and forth a bunch of times I assume it would break like any small piece of metal.

CPU = Intel i7 950
Motherboard = Asus P6X58D
RAM = Corsair XMS3 DDR3 6X 2GB
Power Supply = Corsair AX1200W
Graphics Card = GTX 580 2-way SLI


#4 Orecomm

Orecomm

  • Members
  • 257 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roseburg, Oregon
  • Local time:04:03 AM

Posted 18 April 2010 - 10:20 PM

A kink in the cable can change the characteristic impedance and increase crosstalk in a Cat 5 or 6 cable. This is of primary concern to the cable installer who typically needs to document that each cable passes the full applicable spec. In practical use the kink is unlikely to create much of an issue unless the insulation is crushed to the point that individual conductors short or are broken. There is a lot of headroom in the cable specs at 100Mbps to handle most types of casual damage. Gigabit is a bit pickier. That said, a cable with a noticeable kink is always one of the "usable suspects" when oddness occurs on a network connection. For the price of a cable it's just not worth a tech call in most cases. The "50% reduction in connection speed" could only be due to an increased error rate, which should show up on the switch port stats if you have a managed switch. Ethernet doesn't slow down, it just has a lot of retransmissions if data is getting clobbered. I'd say it's a lot more common that the link will simply quit working than degrade to that level. Still, the cable is usually the easiest and cheapest component to replace. When in doubt, "round up the usual suspects".

#5 cryptodan

cryptodan

    Bleepin Madman


  • Members
  • 21,868 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Catonsville, Md
  • Local time:11:03 AM

Posted 20 April 2010 - 05:09 AM

A kink in the cable can change the characteristic impedance and increase crosstalk in a Cat 5 or 6 cable. This is of primary concern to the cable installer who typically needs to document that each cable passes the full applicable spec. In practical use the kink is unlikely to create much of an issue unless the insulation is crushed to the point that individual conductors short or are broken. There is a lot of headroom in the cable specs at 100Mbps to handle most types of casual damage. Gigabit is a bit pickier. That said, a cable with a noticeable kink is always one of the "usable suspects" when oddness occurs on a network connection. For the price of a cable it's just not worth a tech call in most cases. The "50% reduction in connection speed" could only be due to an increased error rate, which should show up on the switch port stats if you have a managed switch. Ethernet doesn't slow down, it just has a lot of retransmissions if data is getting clobbered. I'd say it's a lot more common that the link will simply quit working than degrade to that level. Still, the cable is usually the easiest and cheapest component to replace. When in doubt, "round up the usual suspects".



I 100% Wholeheartedly agree with this.

#6 Versenumber2

Versenumber2

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 01 September 2017 - 04:16 PM

Same question, more specific however as to the condition of a CAT6: Cable that comes with a router, typically bent in a U shape several times to fit in the box.

Any data or speed degradation?

#7 dropbear

dropbear

  • Members
  • 134 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brisbane
  • Local time:09:03 PM

Posted 01 September 2017 - 05:34 PM

absolutely none at all.


Instead of reading this, why not do a backup of your PC.

You won't regret it.


#8 Versenumber2

Versenumber2

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 01 September 2017 - 08:59 PM

Yeah that makes sense. If not there would be a lot of people complaining LOL.

#9 Versenumber2

Versenumber2

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 03 September 2017 - 01:31 PM

Results: Download speed 90 Mbps, Upload 5 Mbps

#10 Versenumber2

Versenumber2

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 03 September 2017 - 01:35 PM

That's a wired connection btw. I expected to see 10-15 Mbps for the upload speed. Maybe because it was an iOS device?
I'm getting my MBA back this week and will post the results.

#11 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,291 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:06:03 AM

Posted 05 September 2017 - 12:56 PM

Same question, more specific however as to the condition of a CAT6: Cable that comes with a router, typically bent in a U shape several times to fit in the box.

Any data or speed degradation?

 

What you are referring to is the Maximum Bend Radius - "Bend radius is the minimum radius a cable can be bent without kinking it, damaging it, or shortening its life. The minimum bend radius for Category 5, 5e, and 6 cable is four times the cable diameter, which is approximately 1 inch. When cabling is bent beyond this specified minimum bend radius, it can cause transmission failures. All pathways must maintain the minimum bend radius wherever the cable makes a bend."






1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users