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Can't rename Local Disk or Mobile Desk.


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#1 Bone Idol

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 05:32 AM

I have two computers, with both operating with Windows XP.

I use Acronis to backup my local disk of one of these to an external hard-drive. The Local Disk is signified by (C:), while the ext hard-drive is labeled as (I:).

However, with my other computer, the Local Disk is (I:), while the ext hard-drive is (C:).

This means that I can recover my saved data to only one of the computers, and not both.

How can I rename the Local Disk and 'Mobile Desk' to have the same label in both computers?

Thank you.

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 08:36 AM

I don't believe that an external hard drive can be reflected as C:, since C: is the drive letter reserved for system partition or first partition on a drive attached to a motherboard.

An external drive cannot acquire a C: designation, since there is a partition already designated as C: on the system.

Example...when a hard drive containing a single partition which is the system partition on System 1....is attached as a secondary drive on System 2...the hard drive belonging to System 1 becomes something other than C:.

That's the way Windows XP works.

The drive letter assigned any external drive...can never be C:, IMO.

Please post a screenshot from Disk Management which reflects what you have stated...and I will understand better.

Louis

#3 Bone Idol

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 06:24 PM

Thanks for your help, hamluis.

Since 10pm last night I've had Acronis making a backup of my local disk to the destination mobile desk - and there's still an hour to go. 12 hours to do the job, when normally it takes less than 30 minutes. I have no idea what the problem is.

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#4 hamluis

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 07:15 PM

My guess would be...either file system or hard drive problems.

Acronis is normally faster than what I use, but I can do any backup within...oops, I think I see something pertinent.

You have compression enabled on one of those drives, I would not suggest that.

You also have indexing enabled...I would not suggest that either.

I'd make those two changes and then begin anew with the backup effort.

I would also suggest...that you limit the size any partition serving as the system partition on any disk. I would not make the partition larger than 25GB for XP, 50GB for Win 7. The larger the partition is unnecessarily...the longer it takes to do anything involving a complete scan of the partition.

What you posted is useful...but it's not a screenshot from Disk Management. Start/Run...type diskmgmt.msc and hit Enter. Take a screenshot of the lower portion..so that we can see all drives and all partitions. Thanks.

Louis

#5 Bone Idol

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 08:29 PM

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#6 hamluis

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 08:35 PM

Remove Disk1 (stated 160GB hard drive) from the system...reboot the system...tell me what letter the system drive (320GB stated) reflects.

You've busy playing with your drives :thumbsup:.

Louis

#7 Bone Idol

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 08:59 PM

You've just reminded me that I bought 'Drive Detective' a few weeks ago, and it was a total f-up. I followed their instructions to the letter, but every time I did a new scan it showed the drives still needing updating. After a few incomprehensible communications with the DD help guy, I gave up. Haven't touched it since. This must be where all these different letters come from. Also had 'D' 'E' and 'H' letters for my Local Disk and Mobile Desk.

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#8 hamluis

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 09:59 PM

Go to Disk Management...try to rename I: to C:.

Do not attach other drives yet.

Louis

#9 Bone Idol

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 01:38 AM

No luck. The facility is there to change it, but it's refusing to do so.

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My CD drive was always D:, but now it's H:

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Edited by Bone Idol, 04 April 2010 - 06:53 AM.


#10 hamluis

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 10:25 AM

Thanks.

I know that a repair install right now will change it back to C:, but Microsoft has some info that you may want to look at and consider: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/223188.

For the most part, this is not recommended, especially if the drive letter is the same as when Windows was installed. The only time that you may want to do this is when the drive letters get changed without any user intervention.

I myself would just do a repair install of XP, with secondary drives disconnected (as they are now)...takes 35 minutes and I've done that before so I know it works.

Once that is done, I would attach any/all secondary hard drives and I think the result should be the letter I: being assigned to the first secondary hard drive attached.

FWIW: Local Disk is the default name XP gives to a hard drive. You can change the name to anything in Explorer view of My Computer.

Louis

#11 Bone Idol

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 10:02 PM

Thanks for that link, Louis. I'll check it out later.

I did a repair using my Windows XP Installation CD... and disaster struck.

When it was all finished, I couldn't connect to the internet. I phoned the tech guy at my service provider, and after a thorough online checkup, she said there was nothing wrong with my modem or its connections, and that the problem was my Network Adaptor or USB adaptor has gone missing in my computer.

Earlier, I had tried the modem's Installation CD with no luck. It kept saying it couldn't detect a modem.

I'm now using my backup computer.

I want to rip and burn a Network adaptor to CD, and then download this into my other PC.

I tried to use my Acronis Restore CD to fetch what is needed from my external hard-drive, but this didn't work because the 'Next' button was always greyed-out.

Edited by Bone Idol, 04 April 2010 - 10:05 PM.


#12 hamluis

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 08:46 AM

A dead NIC...is easily replaced, unless it's a laptop.

I wouldn't consider that a "disaster", just one of those things that happen and don't require too much pain to overcome.

Your modem...is not your NIC. A typical system has a modem for dialup connection and a NIC for networking/broadband connections.

If you are referring to cable modem installation software...I've only seen such used with DSL connections.

I can't help you with Acronis problems, I've never used it (other than just to install it and see if it did anything that would prompt me to buy it). You'll have to research the Acronis webpage for info on dealing with their software issues/questions.

Louis

#13 Bone Idol

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 02:01 AM

After the Windows XP Installation CD repair session failed to correct the drive lettering anomaly, I did a clean/install - and it worked.

The letters are correct now.

Only trouble is that now when I scroll, my screen ripples. I once heard this is a Nvidia problem.

I've been having no luck with Drive Detective's scans and installing of drive and chipset updates.

My computer is fine except for this annoying rippling every time I scroll a page.

Thanks for your help, Louis.

Herbert

PS. I've fixed the rippling... Start - Control Panel - System - Hardware tab - Device Manager - NVIDIA entries showed a big green Question Mark. Right clicked these and opted for Windows to find and install driver updates. When done, rebooted... problem solved.

:thumbsup:

Edited by Bone Idol, 06 April 2010 - 03:38 AM.


#14 hamluis

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 09:42 AM

Glad to see that you have resolved all issues...happy computing :thumbsup:.

Louis




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