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Ctrl+Alt+Delete in Windows XP


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#1 Shoban Sen

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Posted 17 September 2005 - 10:54 PM

I just unpacked a Dell Inspiron 6000 notebook computer which came with Windows XP Home Edition with Service Pack 2. I need to install several software in it (of course, not all in one day). My desktop still runs good old Windows 98. I always close all programs before installing a new software by using Ctrl+Alt+Del keys and then clicking on End Task. In Windows 98, Ctrl+Alt+Del keys brings up Close Program dialog box which is pretty straight forward. In Windows XP, the same key combination brings up Task Manager (am I right?) which has several tabs. One of them is Programs and one is Processes. I am a little puzzled here. I know I have to close ALL running programs (including the ones running in the background). But am I supposed to close the Processes too? I am not sure what exactly are "Processes", but looks like at least some of these are those programs which always run on the background.

Somebody please advice me how to correctly install the software in Windows XP. I do not want to screw up my brand new (and expensive!) computer. Thanks for your good advice.
~Shoban Sen~
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#2 ddeerrff

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 12:40 AM

Simply close all open windows. You do not need to, nor *should* you, kill all active processes.

'Open windows' would refer to such programs and applications like Internet Explorer, Word, Excel, any games, ect. You do not need to access taskmanager to close these applications. Do not close or disable your antivirus program.
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#3 frankie12

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 10:07 AM

like ddeerrff said you do NOT have to close all of the processes. That could do some harm to your computer.

#4 Enthusiast

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 11:33 AM

Read the instructions given on the page from which you are downloading the programs. Some of them might tell you to disable your AV app, but before I did that I would be certain of the reputation of whoever is offering the program - that it was from a well known reputable source.

Here are some programs that you should install to keep your computer protected against malware (in addition to whatever you choose to be your anti-virus program)

I suggest that you also replace the Windows firewall with Zonealarm or one of the other well known freeware firewalls as the Windows firewall only protects you from incoming threats and not any outgoing malware at all. (Trojans, phonehomes, dialers, etc)

Free Zone Alarm SE: http://www.lavasoftusa.com/support/download/
http://www.zonelabs.com/store/content/comp...;NONE?lid=ho_za

You must have the firewall active before you access the internet so leave the Windows firewall active until you download and activate a better one.

Since the AV program that came with your computer is probably a limited free trial you might want to replace it with AVG (freeware) or the firewall of your choice.
Antivirus programs - freeware (you can only use one resident anti-virus program on your computer. More than one will conflict)

AVG: http://www.grisoft.com/us/us_index.php

Avast Anti-virus freeware
http://www.komando.com/bestshareware.asp


Anti-malware freeware (You can run as many of these as you wish. Generally there is no conflict between these and you should always run several)

*AdAware SE: http://www.lavasoftusa.com/software/adaware/

*Spybot S&D: http://www.safer-networking.org/en/index.html

*the two most important to have!

Microsoft Antispyware Beta: http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/s...re/default.mspx

SpywareBlaster: http://www.javacoolsoftware.com/spywareblaster.html

Microsoft Malicious Software Removal Tool (Win XP and Win 2000):
http://www.microsoft.com/security/malwareremove/default.mspx

AČ - Free from http://www.majorgeeks.com/download4281.html . Run it, click Search for Updates, then click Scan.


CWShredder (the best for CWS coolwebsearch malicious malware renoval)
CW Shredder removes some variants of spyware known as the Coolwebsearch Trojan. The Trojan takes advantage of a flaw in a key component of Windows -- Microsoft's version of the Java Virtual Machine -- to install itself via popups often found on porn and illegal software (a.k.a. "warez") sites. Run CWShredder after installing, and have it look for updates. Then click the "Fix" button, and the program will both scan and fix any problems it finds. If your system does not have this kind of spyware, it will give you the good news.
Freeware
http://www.intermute.com/spysubtract/cwshr...r_download.html

Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer (MBSA)
MBSA is an easy-to-use tool designed for the IT professional that helps small and medium businesses determine their security state in accordance with Microsoft security recommendations and offers specific remediation guidance. Improve your security management process by using MBSA to detect common security misconfigurations and missing security updates on your computer systems.
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/...s/mbsahome.mspx


online trojan scans here -
http://scan.sygatetech.com/pretrojanscan.html
http://windowsecurity.com/trojanscan
Web based online Antivirus and anti-malware scans: (these can be run regardless of whatever else you are using. You must use Internet Explorer to run these.)

Kaspersky Anti-Virus Web Scanner
http://www.kaspersky.com/service?chapter=161739400#betatest

Windows Security Trojanscan
http://www.windowsecurity.com/trojanscan/trojanscan.asp

Panda Activescan (IE only)
http://www.pandasoftware.com/activescan/co...n_principal.htm

Trend Micro antivirus and malware scan:
http://housecall-beta.trendmicro.com/en/st...orp.asp?id=scan

Etrust Anti-virus web scanner
http://www3.ca.com/securityadvisor/virusinfo/scan.aspx

Edited by Enthusiast, 18 September 2005 - 11:43 AM.


#5 Shoban Sen

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 01:45 PM

Thanks for your detailed advice regarding installing software in my new computer. The software I am going to install first came with my new Canon digital camera, in 2 CD's, for editing digital photos and digital videos. I think I can trust Canon. (wink)

Connecting first time to the Internet is a real pain in the neck these days. You have sooo many things to worry about. My old computer has Windows98 and to protect against bad things I have Norton Antivirus (2003), ZoneAlarm firewall, and AdAware SE anti-spyware. My new computer (Windows XP Home SP2) came with Norton Internet Security 2005 with 15 months subscription. Do I REALLY need any other antivirus or firewall or anti-spyware/malware? I practice safe computing, ie, do not visit porn or other dubious sites, and do not download anything (freeware, screensaver, etc.) from any not so well-known source. I don't want to fill my hard drive with numerous software doing the same thing (like I choose between WordPerfect and Microsoft Word, don't keep both). And yes, there is always risk of conflict between two software doing the same thing!

I am planning to activate the built-in Windows XP Security System before connecting to the Internet, and as soon as I connect, I will update my Norton Internet Security 2005 that came installed in my new computer and scan my whole computer before doing anything else. Is this simple plan reasonably safe?

Let's be cautious and not panic about "what if" situations. A lot really depends on one's surfing habits ... I think.
~Shoban Sen~
I am always learning ...

#6 Enthusiast

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 02:28 PM

SP 2 automatically has the Windows firewall on by default.
Immediately updating Norton is wise and absolutely necessary.

You still need the other malware programs I suggested because Norton (or any other Anti-virus program) does not protect against all the other kinds of malware, (ie trojans, dialers, etc), in fact, each anti-malware program will find additional malware the others did not. (the same is true for anti-virus scans so that validates the need to use web based scans occasionally in addition to your resident anti-virus program). Malware technology has progressed to such a great degree that just careful surfing is no longer protection enough.

Keep the scanner addresses in case of future needs, in fact, I put them in my "favorites list" should I need them and do use all of them at least occasionally just to make sure my resident AV program did not miss any. It does happen! You should do so too. Web based scans do not reside in your computer and therefore use no resources except while you are using them.

The Microsoft Anti-malware ap provides unique real time protection from malware and so does Spybot Search and Destroy especially if you activate the TeaTimer function. "The Resident TeaTimer is a tool of Spybot-S&D which perpetually monitors the processes called/initiated. It immediately detects known malicious processes wanting to start and terminates them giving you some options how to deal with this process in the future: You can set TeaTimer to:
- be informed, when the process tries to start again
- automatically kill the process
- or generally allow the process to run There is also an option to delete the file associated with this process.

In addition, TeaTimer detects, when something wants to change some critical registry keys. TeaTimer can protect you against such changes again giving you an option: You can either "Allow" or "Deny" the change. As TeaTimer is always running in the background, it takes some resources of about 5 MB" - Spybot
- and well worth it.

Unless you have limited hard drive space available I recommend that you install the other anti-malware aps I suggested but do not have them start automatically, in other words, do not let them install themselves in the start menu. That way you can use them occasionally as you wish and not use any resources when you aren't using them.

One other suggestion: I always partition my main drive into three partitions (unless there is a second HD to start with).

I leave the op system on C, install other programs on D and all data on E (my documents, etc).

If you ever have the need to reformat and reload Windows you do not loose any data or programs you installed.

If you install a second hard drive (actual not virtual) you can move your pagefile and other Windows temp storage that clutters the drive to it (ie temp files) as well as data backup. That will keep your op system much cleaner and faster.

#7 Shoban Sen

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 08:20 PM

Dear Enthusiast:

Thank you for your valued suggestions. I can tell you are very experienced in computing. I will take your advice and shall follow all your suggestions.

I am glad to report that I have successfully and SAFELY connected my new computer to the Internet and immediately updated Windows XP with all available updates. Then I activated and updated my Norton Internet Security 2005, turned on all the available security features, then did a full scan of my computer. Norton gave my computer a clean bill of health. Right now Norton is guarding my computer from all evils. (Smile). I am actually writing this reply from my new computer. Feels great! (Smile)

Thanks again for all your advice. Shall do as suggested and (hopefully) stay trouble-free and happy.

With kind regards,
~Shoban Sen~
I am always learning ...

#8 Enthusiast

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 08:29 PM

Glad to hear it went well.

Good luck with your new computer and let us know if we can assist you again.




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