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STOP: 0X00000024 Can't get past blue screen


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#1 autumnfrigger

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 04:07 PM

Hello,

Our battery on our laptop is fully dead, so our laptop only runs off of wall power. The cord got unplugged from the laptop last night and of course, the computer went dead.

When I restarted, I got the blue screen with the message "***STOP: 0x00000024 (0x00190203, 0x8A5C7A98, 0XC0000102, 0X00000000)".

I have tried all of the options on the black screen that comes up such as Safe Mode and Last Good Configuration, but no matter how I proceed, I continue to receive the blue screen with the same error message. I have also tried using the options on the F8 screen with the same results. I have not tried any of the following options because I am not familiar with them: Boot Logging, VGA Mode, Directory Service Restore Mode, and Debugging Mode. I would be happy to try one if I had further instructions and someone thinks it would help.

I then put in the XP installation CD and went into the recovery console. I entered the command "chkdsk /r", and it ran to 100% completion. I have done this twice and I am still getting the same results.

I am fairly confident that we do not have a virus because I ran the Avast! Boot Time Scan two days ago as well as Malwarebytes and Spybot S&D in safe mode. I did this because the Wireless Router has been acting funny for about 2 weeks and I wanted to make sure that it was actually something with the router, not a virus.

I have not been able to get past the blue screen since the power failure. I am not an expert on computers, but I am able to follow directions. Any help would be deeply appreciated!

Here's some info on the computer (don't know if it will help or not):
Laptop = Dell Inspiron 1520
BIOS Version = A04 (11/05/2007)
Processor = Intel Core 2 Duo
Operating System = Windows XP Home Edition

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 04:47 PM

Hi :thumbsup:.

Well...the good news is that you've already done what I would suggest. You've run the chkdsk /r command from the RC.

The bad news is that...typically, if chkdsk /r doesn't fix it, there's not a lot that can be done other than an attempted repair install or a clean install something more drastic.

0x00000024: NTFS_FILE_SYSTEM
A problem occurred within NTFS.SYS, the driver file that allows the system to read and write to NTFS file system drives. There may be a physical problem with the disk, or an Interrupt Request Packet (IRP) may be corrupted. Other common causes include heavy hard drive fragmentation, heavy file I/O, problems with some types of drive-mirroring software, or some antivirus software

http://www.aumha.org/a/stop.htm

Take a look at 24, left hand column...and you'll see that it indicates that this is a problem with a specific file. Well, that's sort of true...it could be a problem with that file, but the impact is on the file system. And the file system could be screwed up because the hard drive itself has problems.

When/if I get this error on my systems...I just do a clean install. There are various attempts by others to overcome this but I find that if chkdks /r can't do it, it's not worth spending hours on and still not knowing if I've done the right thing. Clean install (after a hard drive diagnostic) removes the suspense for me, which is what I want.

Some users have reported that running the fixboot command after running a chkdsk /r...did the trick for them, others have tried all sorts of tricks. See example following, http://www.ehow.com/how_4690469_ntfssys-er...nux-livecd.html.

I'll put it this way. The file system in XP is analogous to the slab that a house sits on. If the soil under the slab gives way, it results in a problem for the slab and anything on it. So it is with the hard drive, NTFS, and XP.

You can try almost anything you might want to try, something might work...but I would expect to end up at the diagnostic/clean install point.

Louis

#3 autumnfrigger

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 05:02 PM

Thank you for the advice!!! :thumbsup:

I went back to the laptop in question after I posted and took a deeper look at the RC. When it loads, it says "1: F:\Windows". I don't think we have an F drive. I think the F drive is usually for the flash drive. So, do I need to enter chkdsk /r , or do I need to put the "F" or "C" in there?

A couple more rookie questions, if I may:
1. Will the repair install or clean install delete all of our files and pics off the computer? We have fallen behind on backing up our files to our flash drives and stand to lose a lot.
2. I have downloaded the Windows Memory Diagnostic and burnt the .exe file to a cd. When I tried to boot it in the computer, nothing happened. Do I need to do something before burning it to the cd to get it to work?

This is starting to get out of my skill set. I'm off to read the recommended ehow article for now. Thanks again!

#4 hamluis

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 05:28 PM

<<When it loads, it says "1: F:\Windows". I don't think we have an F drive. I think the F drive is usually for the flash drive. So, do I need to enter chkdsk /r , or do I need to put the "F" or "C" in there?>>

As long as you put the number 1 as your selection when asked "which Windows install"...it runs on that install. I would not worry about the drive letters reflected in the RC. As long as you know that there is only 1 partition on that system with Windows installed...the RC picked it up.

<<Will the repair install or clean install delete all of our files and pics off the computer? We have fallen behind on backing up our files to our flash drives and stand to lose a lot.>>

Well...the prudent thing to do (IMO) anytime you have a situation where it's feasible to question the functionality of the hard drive or the file system...is to try to access your files from another system and move them from that drive. "Corrupt" is just another word for damaged. If the file system becomes corrupted, a user may not be able to easily access any files on that drive/partition; ditto for a damaged hard drive.

I would do that before doing anything else, whether it's run chkdsk, run fixboot, do a diagnotic, etc.

<<I have downloaded the Windows Memory Diagnostic and burnt the .exe file to a cd. When I tried to boot it in the computer, nothing happened. Do I need to do something before burning it to the cd to get it to work?>>

I think there's some misunderstanding here. Why are you running a memory diagnostic test series?

To answer (I think) your question...you need to create a bootable CD with that .exe file on it. If it's not bootable, nothing will happen.

One of the options of your software used to burn...should be "bootable CD."

Louis

I meant to add...a repair install of XP normally will not result in loss of data. But...if the underlying basis of the system is having problems, all bets are off. I normally try a repair install always before I do a clean install. I don't expect it to overcome anything, but it's about 40 minutes of time that I have, just on the chance that it may correct something. It won't overcome malware and it won't overcome any hardware problem.

Edited by hamluis, 01 April 2010 - 05:31 PM.


#5 autumnfrigger

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 05:40 PM

Thank you for the detailed information and further explanation, Louis!!! I am going to follow your directions step by step and hopefully post good news soon!

I also appreciate your patience and not talking to me like I'm a bleeping idiot!

#6 autumnfrigger

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 05:49 PM

I forgot to add, I was trying to run the Windows Memory Diagnostic because it was recommended at the site below:
http://www.pcstats.com/articleview.cfm?art...1647&page=8

For now, I am going to focus on your instructions so I don't get any more confused.

#7 hamluis

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 06:51 PM

No problem :thumbsup:.

That guide you linked to...is OK, as far as general guidance re troubleshooting BSODs is concerned. It's enough to give some general ideas.

But there are more detailed guides and clues which are not addressed in that guide...looking at the content of the BSOD for more specific clues...that make that guide (IMO) not very useful to either novice or someone who may have better investigative techniques/procedures. IMO, the aumha.org webpage on BSODs/STOP errors is a much better place to start and I give thanks to the folks who have contributed their knowledge to it.

Louis




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