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Network Backbone


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#1 Mike19865586

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 05:06 AM

I have a question in regards to a network backbone. From what I understand, the network backbone generally is capable of a higher throughput than other connections throughout the network. For example lets say that I have a network consisting of one hub, three nodes, and two servers. The three nodes are connected to the hub via CAT 3 UTP @ 10mbps, hub is connected to switch via CAT 3 UTP @ 10mbps, and from the switch the two servers establish a connection via CAT3 3 UTP @ 10mbps. Now if I wanted to enable quicker access to the servers, could I just replace the NIC cards in the two servers with a 100BaseTX NIC and replace the existing CAT3 cabling with CAT5? Is this essentially what a network backbone is?

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#2 CaveDweller2

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 12:48 PM

Just curious, taking a networking course?

I like to think of networking like paving roads. Cause its how stuff travels, anyway. What you are talking about is having a town with 2 lane roads everywhere and then for whatever reason one of the side streets you decide to make 4 lanes. Now cars traveling to it can't go any faster and more of them can't go at one time. Coming from that street those 4 lanes have to merge back into 2 so you get a bottle neck there and things slowly grind to a halt.

The backbone of a network is everything that makes up a network. The NICs inside equipment, the wires that connect them, the hubs/switches that allows them to communicate with one another and routers that let them communicate with other networks. So to change a network from 10 Mbps to 100 Mbps you have to change everything that makes it up.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#3 Baltboy

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 12:56 PM

Yes and no. The theory behind what you are getting at is correct which is the backbone has more bandwidth. Basically the backbone is the main service that connects multiple nodes. So to me a basic setup might be as follows. In the main server room or data center there is your main rack of routers, switches, ect. that serve two purposes. One is to connect the servers and other appliances to the network probably via 100baseT or 1000baseT. The other would be to connect the remote sections of the network together. The more remote sections of the network that are connected via their own local switches to the network. ALL of the switches and routers would be connected with a fiber optic based connect from 2Gbps to 10Gbps in order to keep up with the demand on the network. Those switches and fiber optic cabling that goes between them are the network backbone. Keep in mind that this varies depending on the size and demand of the network. Companies such as Verizon and Comcast provide services from the central office to the end user From central office to central office and back to their data centers can be OC12 to OC192 lines which are fiber optic networks that can handle upwards of 9.6Gbps over long distances. The same therory applies here though as the cable as well as the network appliances that interpret the signals from them are the "backbone" :thumbsup:
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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#4 Mike19865586

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 01:52 PM

So basically a backbone is usually in most instances going to be referred to as the type of media connecting remote segments?

I wish I could find some sort of example drawing.

Edited by Mike19865586, 31 March 2010 - 01:53 PM.


#5 CaveDweller2

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 03:22 PM

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/comm...et_map_1024.jpg LOL

http://oreilly.com/catalog/lgscalelans/chapter/dlsl_0308.gif The main line that the squares are connected to is the backbone.

Edited by CaveDweller2, 31 March 2010 - 07:09 PM.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#6 Mike19865586

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 08:50 PM

LOL
and
Thank you.




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