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Boot disk problem


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#1 fabrikant

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 09:58 AM

I made a diskette using Windows XP professional. When I boot computer from this diskette, it does not recogize hard drive c:\ or compact disk d:\. How to overcome this?

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#2 cryptodan

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 10:19 AM

What kind of diskette?

#3 Torvald

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 01:12 PM

fabrikant,

Are you trying to use the Windows XP diskette to gain access to the computer that you made the boot diskette from, or are you trying to access a new computer and/or harddrive?

If it's a new computer or harddrive, then you may need to use fdisk to first partition the harddrive and then run the format command. (NOTE: Please be careful NOT to do this if the harddrive already has some data on it.)

Also, if I recall, when you first boot up using a 3-1/2" diskette, you will probably need to access your CD drive by switching to the "E" drive, because the boot diskette creates a temporary Ramdrive using the "D" letter.

Best Wishes.

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#4 fabrikant

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 04:12 PM

It's not a new computer. It is a long existing one. As far as additional D drive is concerned, you might be confused. Windows 98 startup disk creates additional drive. Windows XP doesn't seem to have that option (or does it?).

This is exactly what surprises me the most. One of the options in formatting diskette is to make it bootable and this is what I did. What kind of dummy designs bootable diskette in such a way that it does not contain drivers support, either for hard drive or compact disk.

The message I get is "Invalid Drive Specification". I do not want to download anything from the internet. Please tell me which file from existing Windows XP Professional I have to copy on diskette and what commands I need to add to autoexec.bat and config.sys files. This is my question.

#5 Torvald

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 07:47 PM

My apologies,

You are exactly right about the additional D: ramdrive not being created in Windows XP. I have been working lately on resurrecting an old Windows 98 computer and was thinking about that instead of your Windows XP situation.

I've never myself needed to use a 3-1/2" startup disk for Windows XP, but according to what I've Googled today, your diskette is supposed to load the drivers you need to access your CD drive (and hopefully your C: harddrive too.) If your diskette is not giving you that access, it's possible that your diskette has gone bad and needs to be replaced. Also, please be aware that according to Microsoft, Windows XP Home edition startup disks will NOT work with Windows XP Pro.

Therefore, your best bet is to create a new startup disk using a separate 3-1/2" diskette on a different computer that also has Windows XP pro installed. If such a computer is not readily available, you can instead download and run the program at the following Microsoft website to create a new Windows XP startup disk: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details...;displaylang=en

I know you said you didn't want to download anything from the Internet, but since this is from a Microsoft website, it should be safe.

Please let me know if this works.

Google is my friend. Make Google your friend too.


#6 hamluis

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 08:37 PM

What screen do you get when you use this diskette?

If it's on a floppy, you should get an A: prompt.

To access C: or D:, you may need to enter cd C: or cd D: as your first command.

System manufacturer and model?

Louis

#7 fabrikant

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 02:28 PM

My diskette has not gone bad. It is being done bootable while being formatted. Everyting went fine. There are no errors on the diskette. It just does not have any drivers or either hard disk or CD. Did you succeed in making bootable diskette which would allow access to hard drive using XP Professional? If yes, just give me the list of the files on your diskette.

The screen I get is A:\ prompt. And you are mistaken: command cd means change directory within the same drive, not change drive. System is Compaq.

Thanks.

#8 hamluis

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 03:03 PM

Sorry, I couldn't remember correctly...it's been years since I even thought about using a floppy disk, even for hard drive diagnostics :thumbsup:.

To be honest, I have used a floppy to boot a system since Win 98 days, so I really can't tell you what the commands should be.

But...I think you are right in asserting that the drivers, etc. to boot...should be on that floppy, just as they were for Win 95/Win 98.

But, from what I just read, the XP bootable floppy was never intended to work that way. To do what you want to do...it appears that you need the downloadable floppies offered by Microsoft.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310994

Louis

Since you have a Compaq, all of these things probably won't work...since Compaq develops its own recovery/restore disks and partition structure. I would check their website if nothing else works.

Edited by hamluis, 01 April 2010 - 03:06 PM.


#9 cryptodan

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 03:07 PM

If all else fails go here: http://www.bootdisk.com/

#10 fabrikant

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 04:03 PM

You write: "But, from what I just read, the XP bootable floppy was never intended to work that way."

I do not get the logic of it. What is the point to have a diskette using which you can boot your computer, but you have to stay in A:\ and you can go nowhere else. What is the point to have such diskette?

#11 hamluis

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 04:25 PM

To be honest...I think that the inclusion of the "boot CD/recovery CD" in XP...was not thought out well. That function probably only remained in XP because someone failed to notice that it wasn't called for and that floppy drives were on the way out...and perhaps they wanted to continue to provide a feeling of security for those users married to using floppies.

I don't know...all I know is that I (and probably millions of other users) never bothered to try that function in XP...because all XP CDs were bootable and a floppy served no purpose. MS didn't consult me before they did this...I could have told them not to bother :thumbsup:.

Logically, you are correct...there is no logic in it existing, especially so since Microsoft provided "setup disks" for anyone who wanted such as an additional security blanket.

Time has made such usage...obsolete, with better ways of accomplishing what those disks used to provide.

Louis

#12 Torvald

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 07:50 PM

Just thought of one more thing you could try.

When you first start up your computer, hit the appropriate key to go to the BIOS menu.

Then check to make sure that your harddrive and CD drive are being recognized by the BIOS. If they are not, then changing your BIOS settings to recognize them should fix your problem.

Best wishes.

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#13 fabrikant

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 04:30 PM

I checked. Both C and D are recognized.

#14 Torvald

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 03:43 PM

Well, I just created my own Windows XP Pro 3-1/2" boot diskette to test your situation personally, since I'd never actually used a boot diskette before in Windows XP.

You are exactly right - the Windows XP Pro boot diskette gave me access to only my floppy drive, and not to my harddrive or my CD drive. This seems amazingly dumb of Microsoft - if a boot diskette only gives access to the floppy drive, it is not much use.

I also tried using an old Windows 98 bootable diskette, but it would also not recognize my harddrive or CD drive. Not sure why not - Perhaps it has something to do with the NTFS files system.

At any rate, it looks like your only path left is to go into your BIOS and set your CD Drive as the first bootable item, with your harddrive set as the second bootable item. You should then be able to insert your Windows XP Pro CD and boot directly to it.

Please give that a try and let us know how it turns out.

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#15 fabrikant

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 02:01 PM

I do not really buy this NTFS explanation, because CD has nothing to do with NTFS and I cannot go there either. The real explanation comes from consideration of autoexec and config files. If you look at them, they contain no device drivers for either hard drive or compact disks. And in the files downloaded, you see only screen and keyboard drivers.

I invite somone who knows what drivers should be downloaded and what kind of command should be used in autoexec and config.sys to let me know what they are.

As far as booting from CD is concerned, I certainly know how this can be done, but this is not the purpose of my enquiry.




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