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antivirus programs


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#1 wdkoseck

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 09:59 AM

Can someone tell me what a good free antivirus program is to install on a laptop running Windows Vista home Basic?

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#2 xblindx

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 03:57 PM

There are lots of topics about this already, but again:

Personally, I would recommend using either Avira AntiVir Free/Personal edition, avast! or Comodo for an antivirus program, just be sure that you only have 1 anti-virus program installed on your machine

For a firewall I would recommend Comodo, please note that the Comodo firewall installation also includes an Anti-virus program, if you decide to choose another anti-virus (not Comodo), then please be sure to only install the firewall, you will be prompted during installation if you want to install just the firewall, or the firewall and the anti-virus.

The on-demand anti-malware scanners I recommend are Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and SUPERAnti-Spyware.

For additional protection, SpywareBlaster is a great program to protect you from visiting malicious sites, and blocking tracking cookies. Note that SpywareBlaster isn't an actively running program. You download it, run it once, and then make sure you update it every week or 2 and you will always be protected. It works by tweaking some IE and Firefox settings to block tracking cookies and provide additional protection.

#3 yungen2003

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 08:31 PM

Microsoft Security Essentials Is a very good always free and the detection rate is par with avira and doesnt have the annoying popup and actually has less falses then avira too.

#4 MILGEEK

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 09:46 PM

Remember, you get what you pay for!
I personally have used ESET NOD32 for a couple of years now. I found out that McAfee and Symantics Zero Day attack policy is far from perfect. I only recommend and install (on all systems I work on) ESET now. While the price is a little high, I have yet to have a problem with any type of Malware on my system. And with all of the online transactions going on now, I have the piece of mind that I could be on a torrent site as well as my bank at the same time and not worry one bit.

Just an FYI for all!! I have noticed an alarming trend for Wells Fargo internet bankers. The Vista Internet Security, Security Tools, AntiVirus 2009
AntiVirus 2010, Internet Security 2010 (trial), System Defender have been targeting an unusual amount of computers specific to that bank. Pass the word to all that bank with Wells Fargo. I have been tracking these viruses for a month now and the common thread keeps comming back to WELLS FARGO!

#5 Someones

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 07:46 PM

Remember, you get what you pay for!

This does not necessarily apply for computer security. E.g. check out the testing done at AV-Comparatives.

At OP, you can read a review of best free antiviruses here.

#6 xblindx

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 06:07 PM

I agree, Avira, Avast, and Comodo, although free, have better detection rates than many of the pay-for security programs.

#7 jimlock

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 07:01 PM

Thought I'd add my 2 cents here. Have used AVG Free for 3-4 years, and now face reinstalling the OS for a second or third time. Had several recent attacks; Bit Defender took care of one virus and OneCare took care of a couple more. I'm left with a couple of tough ones apparently, Antivirusxp trojan and Win32/Alureon.G. Still waiting for Microsoft to get back to me after contacting them this morning. Interesting to note that the latest scans by McAffee and Bit Defender showed no viruses (when I knew there are 2) and OneCare found the Alureon again, but not the Antivirusxp. I'm ready to go with Norton and pay some bucks to get decent security.

#8 xblindx

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 04:21 PM

McAffee in my opinion is terrible, Bit Defender is pretty good. The thing you have to remember, is that not all Anti-Virus programs will catch every threat. For instance, Avira will catch a virus that say, Avast, misses. And maybe Avast catches one that Avira misses. There is no 100% protection. I just switched over to Panda Cloud if you are interested. Its important to note that it is most effective on a machine that is currently virus free. It can be downloaded from here

#9 MILGEEK

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 08:04 AM

I had symantic enterprise endpoint protection, and McAfee Enterprise, both failed. Customers had AVG, SEP, McAfee, all had issues. All customers that have had ESET have not had problems. These programs are getting more sofisticated as they go. I am finding that they install to the system and sit dormant for a couple of weeks at a minimum, then attack when an unknown activity prompts it to activate. Still trying to track down where there are coming in from. Anyone been able to track a host that is distributing?




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